Afghan fighting - the latest reports.

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Poppycock

War Hero
I think NATO could be about to set the record for the quickest imploding puppet government in history

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I think NATO could be about to set the record for the quickest imploding puppet government in history

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Where the USA leads, so NATO (generally) follows. Military operations in Afghanistan were initiated by the USA (Op ENDURING FREEDOM), without NATO involvement. Similarly, the decision for US Forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan was a unilateral one by Washington, but without the USA, everyone else had no reason to stay and also headed for the exit.
 

Poppycock

War Hero
Where the USA leads, so NATO (generally) follows. Military operations in Afghanistan were initiated by the USA (Op ENDURING FREEDOM), without NATO involvement. Similarly, the decision for US Forces to be withdrawn from Afghanistan was a unilateral one by Washington, but without the USA, everyone else had no reason to stay and also headed for the exit.
No doubt the US unilaterally started and is stopping the War, but wasn't the 'nation building' / poppy eradication bit in the middle a NATO passion / endeavour?

It certainly couldn't of happened without the collusion of 41 other contributing nations, especially us
 
No doubt the US unilaterally started and is stopping the War, but wasn't the 'nation building' / poppy eradication bit in the middle a NATO passion / endeavour?

It certainly couldn't of happened without the collusion of 41 other contributing nations, especially us

I thought the 'nation-building' was a US initiative. Poppy eradication may have actually been a UK bright idea. From memory, the original NATO mission, which I think started in 2002, was to provide security in Kabul, but then grew over time (and no doubt, US pressure to get more flags on the Powerpoint presentation intro.

E2A: from Wiki

The International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) was a NATO-led military mission in Afghanistan, established by the United Nations Security Council in December 2001 by Resolution 1386, as envisaged by the Bonn Agreement.[2][3] Its main purpose was to train the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) and assist Afghanistan in rebuilding key government institutions, but was also engaged in the War in Afghanistan (2001–present) against the Taliban insurgency.

ISAF was initially charged with securing Kabul and the surrounding areas from the Taliban, al Qaeda and factional warlords, to allow for the establishment of the Afghan Transitional Administration headed by Hamid Karzai.[4] In October 2003, the UN Security Council authorized the expansion of the ISAF mission throughout Afghanistan,[5] and ISAF subsequently expanded the mission in four main stages over the whole of the country.[6] From 2006 to 2011, ISAF became increasingly involved in more intensive combat operations in southern and eastern Afghanistan.

Troop contributors included the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and other NATO member states as well as a number of other countries. The intensity of the combat faced by contributing nations varied greatly, with the United States sustaining the most casualties overall. In early 2010, there were at least 700 military bases inside Afghanistan. About 400 of these were used by American‑led NATO forces and 300 by the ANSF.[7]

For almost two years, the ISAF mandate did not go beyond the boundaries of Kabul. According to General Norbert Van Heyst, such a deployment would require at least ten thousand additional soldiers. The responsibility for security throughout the whole of Afghanistan was to be given to the newly reconstituted Afghan National Army. However, on 13 October 2003, the Security Council voted unanimously to expand the ISAF mission beyond Kabul with Resolution 1510. Shortly thereafter, Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chrétien said that Canadian soldiers (nearly half of the entire force at that time) would not deploy outside Kabul.

On 5 October 2006, ISAF implemented the final stage of its expansion by taking over command of the international military forces in eastern Afghanistan from the U.S.‑led Coalition. In addition to expanding the Alliance's area of operations, the revised operational plan also paved the way for a greater ISAF role in the country. This includes the deployment of ISAF Operational Mentoring and Liaison Teams (OMLTs) to Afghan National Army units at various levels of command.
 
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Two decades of patrolling Helmand, 457 British Troops killed, and now the Taliban are back in control.

What a sad pointless waste of time and British Troops lives that was.
 
Two decades of patrolling Helmand, 457 British Troops killed, and now the Taliban are back in control.

What a sad pointless waste of time and British Troops lives that was.

At least a lot fewer than our first 2 Afghan adventures.
 
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Closer to one decade

First & last combat fatalities were Jan 2004 & Dec 2013, both in Kabul admittedly


Add to that list at the very least four U.K. security contractors on diplomatic missions.
 

Poppycock

War Hero
Add to that list at the very least four U.K. security contractors on diplomatic missions.
If you count Nepalese as UK security contractors (all assumedly ex-Gurkha), there was 14 killed in 2016 by a suicide bomber who attacked their MINI-VAN

A suicide bomber on foot struck a minivan filled with Nepali security guards en route to the Canadian Embassy right after it exited a compound housing the security contractors.

 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I thought the 'nation-building' was a US initiative. Poppy eradication may have actually been a UK bright idea. From memory, the original NATO mission, which I think started in 2002, was to provide security in Kabul, but then grew over time (and no doubt, US pressure to get more flags on the Powerpoint presentation intro.

E2A: from Wiki

The International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) was a NATO-led military mission in Afghanistan, established by the United Nations Security Council in December 2001 by Resolution 1386, as envisaged by the Bonn Agreement.[2][3] Its main purpose was to train the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) and assist Afghanistan in rebuilding key government institutions, but was also engaged in the War in Afghanistan (2001–present) against the Taliban insurgency.

ISAF was initially charged with securing Kabul and the surrounding areas from the Taliban, al Qaeda and factional warlords, to allow for the establishment of the Afghan Transitional Administration headed by Hamid Karzai.[4] In October 2003, the UN Security Council authorized the expansion of the ISAF mission throughout Afghanistan,[5] and ISAF subsequently expanded the mission in four main stages over the whole of the country.[6] From 2006 to 2011, ISAF became increasingly involved in more intensive combat operations in southern and eastern Afghanistan.

Troop contributors included the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and other NATO member states as well as a number of other countries. The intensity of the combat faced by contributing nations varied greatly, with the United States sustaining the most casualties overall. In early 2010, there were at least 700 military bases inside Afghanistan. About 400 of these were used by American‑led NATO forces and 300 by the ANSF.[7]

For almost two years, the ISAF mandate did not go beyond the boundaries of Kabul. According to General Norbert Van Heyst, such a deployment would require at least ten thousand additional soldiers. The responsibility for security throughout the whole of Afghanistan was to be given to the newly reconstituted Afghan National Army. However, on 13 October 2003, the Security Council voted unanimously to expand the ISAF mission beyond Kabul with Resolution 1510. Shortly thereafter, Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chrétien said that Canadian soldiers (nearly half of the entire force at that time) would not deploy outside Kabul.

On 5 October 2006, ISAF implemented the final stage of its expansion by taking over command of the international military forces in eastern Afghanistan from the U.S.‑led Coalition. In addition to expanding the Alliance's area of operations, the revised operational plan also paved the way for a greater ISAF role in the country. This includes the deployment of ISAF Operational Mentoring and Liaison Teams (OMLTs) to Afghan National Army units at various levels of command.
ISAF was a parallel operation to 'Enduring Freedom' (CJTF-180) and UK Ops Jacana, Snipe, etc. which were combat Ops, not security / CIMIC / PRT stuff, which ISAF was predominantly concerned with, along with Force Protection, obviously.
 
If you count Nepalese as UK security contractors (all assumedly ex-Gurkha), there was 14 killed in 2016 by a suicide bomber who attacked their MINI-VAN



They weren’t former U.K. Mil Gurkhas. Many of those employed by PSC’s, IDG notwithstanding, aren’t. That day was an absolute shocker and it totally shook my entire Nepali guard force to their roots, as they worked alongside those unfortunate gentlemen. It very nearly put the kibosh on the use of Nepali staff as guards and, to be fair, I can’t say I blame the Nepalese Government for imposing more stringent guidelines. Especially after the fall out of the investigation of the deaths of those unfortunate souls and the actions of the company that employed them.

Some companies, not all I hasten to add, treat their TCN staff like shit and pay them an absolute pittance.
 
They weren’t former U.K. Mil Gurkhas. Many of those employed by PSC’s, IDG notwithstanding, aren’t. That day was an absolute shocker and it totally shook my entire Nepali guard force to their roots, as they worked alongside those unfortunate gentlemen. It very nearly put the kibosh on the use of Nepali staff as guards and, to be fair, I can’t say I blame the Nepalese Government for imposing more stringent guidelines. Especially after the fall out of the investigation of the deaths of those unfortunate souls and the actions of the company that employed them.

Some companies, not all I hasten to add, treat their TCN staff like shit and pay them an absolute pittance.
I suppose you can also blame the western embassies as well who will always go for the cheapest bidder regardless of any other factors.
 
I suppose you can also blame the western embassies as well who will always go for the cheapest bidder regardless of any other factors.
I would disagree there, as speaking from experience, not all diplomatic missions will go for the cheapest bidder as long as they know they’re going to get value for money.

At least two contracts I’ve worked on have heavily stipulated the care packages available for the Nepalese staff.

Saying that, once the excrement hits the oscillator, some agencies shoulders slope dramatically and leave it to the company to sort out.
 

Poppycock

War Hero
BBC's latest report (aug 01) is balanced, objective reporting for once (albeit with almost every point lifted off twitter)

Shows Taliban at Lashkargah's peace roundabout & Ismail Khan (short father christmas looking one) of Herat calling on anyone with a gun to come join the fight against the Taliban. No mention of Kandahar's damaged runway thought- maybe that's repaired?



This is an incredible ending to it all, but more amazing is the almost realtime, access all areas, battlefield reports and diplomatic exchanges we've got access to. I think Taliban & allies use of social media have made this the most accessible battlefield of all time. And I was there man (on twitter behind a keyboard, warrior-ing away)
 
Looks like the embassy is having a flounce....


 

Poppycock

War Hero
That's 2-big roundabouts & 2-small ones in Lashkargah in Taliban hands by my count

peace roundabout & this tiered sculpture roundabout:

2-more mini-ones pictured here:


In Herat it's reported the government aligned militia that's holding the fort rallied after they got a doorstep clap (like we gave nurses during the bad flu) from the residents of the city (it was actually people on rooftops shouting God's Brilliant)
 
Looks like the embassy is having a flounce....



I wonder whether Pakistan will be designated as a place of safety when the almost inevitable NEO kicks off?
 
Taliban playing by the book; isolate the country physically by seizing border crossings, isolate it regionally by disrupting transport links, then isolate it cognitively by taking over media/broadcasting facilities.

'The Taliban have taken over a TV station in Afghanistan's strategic Helmand province, a source at the TV and radio station told CNN on Monday, marking the latest of a series of advances by the militant group in the country.

'The Helmand TV station, located in the city of Lashkar Gah, the capital of Helmand province, is operated by state-run Radio and Television Afghanistan. Local journalists in Lashkar Gah say there is nothing currently being broadcast over the station. In a text message to CNN, Taliban spokesperson Zabiullah Mujahid said the group has taken over the station.

'While control on the ground is likely to shift back and forth still, as of Monday, Taliban forces were controlling some of the southern outskirts of Kandahar. Taliban forces that had initially surged toward Herat, near the Iran border, have for the moment been pushed back. But it is Lashkar Gah "that may be in the most jeopardy," the official said, with at least two police districts believed to be in Taliban control.

'The weekend saw heavy fighting between the Taliban and Afghan government forces in Lashkar Gah, where local journalists contacted by CNN also said the Taliban now control several districts of the city. The defense official detailed a grim assessment of the situation on Monday, telling CNN: "It's not going well."

'Lashkar Gah sits on strategic routes in all directions, including the highway between Kandahar and Herat and important agricultural areas to the south of the city. The Taliban has long had a strong presence in Helmand province, including around the provincial capital, but has not occupied any part of the capital since being overthrown in 2001.'


https://edition.cnn.com/2021/08/02/asia/afghanistan-us-airstrikes-taliban-intl/index.html
 
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