Afghan fighting - the latest reports.

BBC report a few hours ago:

Top Afghan commander Raziq killed in Kandahar gun attack

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The biggest Taliban ‘success’ to date. The whole country appears to be falling apart.

I was privy to a discussion between a former US ambassador to Afghanistan and the then head of US forces in Afghanistan just over a year ago. They were openly admitting that it was a lost cause. Corruption and ineptitude being their enemy. They were at a loss as to How the ANSF (300,000 strong with superior weapons, vehicles, equipment and training) could be losing to a 30/40,000 strong Taliban. It’s gotten worse since that conversation...
 
The biggest Taliban ‘success’ to date. The whole country appears to be falling apart.

I was privy to a discussion between a former US ambassador to Afghanistan and the then head of US forces in Afghanistan just over a year ago. They were openly admitting that it was a lost cause. Corruption and ineptitude being their enemy. They were at a loss as to How the ANSF (300,000 strong with superior weapons, vehicles, equipment and training) could be losing to a 30/40,000 strong Taliban. It’s gotten worse since that conversation...
The acronym TIA - This is Africa could equally apply to the Afghan context. This is Afghanistan.
 
The whole country appears to be falling apart.
I don't believe it's falling apart: rather, it has only ever been a cohesive Country in the minds of Westerners. Everything I've read or heard about the place since this thread opened instead indicates that beyond the Kabul bubble, there's no widespread sense of nationhood among the population, their loyalties being bounded instead by family and by fealty to local strongmen.

Absent any sense of that kinda 'For King and Country' motivation, it's not hard to see why their soldiers aren't exactly champing at the bit to take on Taliban and risk dying for The Cause.

Not so much falling apart, rather never ever been joined-up to begin with.
 
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The biggest Taliban ‘success’ to date. The whole country appears to be falling apart.

I was privy to a discussion between a former US ambassador to Afghanistan and the then head of US forces in Afghanistan just over a year ago. They were openly admitting that it was a lost cause. Corruption and ineptitude being their enemy. They were at a loss as to How the ANSF (300,000 strong with superior weapons, vehicles, equipment and training) could be losing to a 30/40,000 strong Taliban. It’s gotten worse since that conversation...
I don't believe it's falling apart: rather, it has only ever been a cohesive Country in the minds of Westerners. Everything I've read or heard about the place since this thread opened instead indicates that beyond the Kabul bubble, there's no widespread sense of nationhood among the population, their loyalties being bounded instead by family and by fealty to local strongmen.

Absent any sense of that kinda 'For King and Country' motivation, it's not hard to see why their soldiers aren't exactly champing at the bit to take on Taliban and risk dying for The Cause.

Not so much falling apart, rather never ever been joined-up to begin with.
Tribalism has lasted thousands of years and isn't going away in a hurry.
 
I don't believe it's falling apart: rather, it has only ever been a cohesive Country in the minds of Westerners. Everything I've read or heard about the place since this thread opened instead indicates that beyond the Kabul bubble, there's no widespread sense of nationhood among the population, their loyalties being bounded instead by family and by fealty to local strongmen.

Absent any sense of that kinda 'For King and Country' motivation, it's not hard to see why their soldiers aren't exactly champing at the bit to take on Taliban and risk dying for The Cause.

Not so much falling apart, rather never ever been joined-up to begin with.
Very true. Even on the issue of national ID cards it's turned into a bunfight as the majority want to be known by their ethnicity (pashtun, tajik etc.) and not as Afghan.
 
Very true. Even on the issue of national ID cards it's turned into a bunfight as the majority want to be known by their ethnicity (pashtun, tajik etc.) and not as Afghan.
It's the same all over that neck of the woods. A good mate of mine is from Kazakhstan, both his national ID card and passport refer to him as: "Ethnicity: Russian - Nationality: Kazakhstan".
 
The biggest Taliban ‘success’ to date. The whole country appears to be falling apart.

I was privy to a discussion between a former US ambassador to Afghanistan and the then head of US forces in Afghanistan just over a year ago. They were openly admitting that it was a lost cause. Corruption and ineptitude being their enemy. They were at a loss as to How the ANSF (300,000 strong with superior weapons, vehicles, equipment and training) could be losing to a 30/40,000 strong Taliban. It’s gotten worse since that conversation...
It was a lost cause from the start; you can't implant western culture on an alien culture, then use local hire mercenaries who exploit the people, to supposedly facilitate a revolution.

The Taliban was founded for good reasons, they may have turned into butchers but they are still of the people. The coalition put the bad people back on top and the war could last a 100 years but inevitably the Taliban and the Pashtun will rule themselves.
 
And they may well wind up doing it within borders that don't accord with the outside world's version of political boundaries (which seems to be pretty much how they behave right now)
The Pashtun are bestride the border and Pakistan itself is another artificial entity that only hangs together because the sheer scale of armaments controlled by central government. Afghan may have worked if they had brought old king back as unifying force, but the global consensus west think they know better.
 

Goatman

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3 US service members killed in Afghanistan roadside bomb blast, officials say

Three American service members were killed in a roadside bomb attack in Afghanistan on Tuesday, marking the deadliest day for U.S. forces in the embattled country this year.

Three American troops were killed and three others were wounded in the attack in the notorious Taliban hotbed – Ghazini city – after their armored vehicle drove over a massive bomb buried under the road. An American contractor was also wounded in the attack.

Including Tuesday’s attack, 12 Americans have been killed in combat in Afghanistan this year. Five Americans have been killed this month alone.
 
Gunmen attack UK contractors' compound in Afghan capital, at least 10 dead | Reuters
Attack on the G4S Compound in Kabul. @Krazy_Ivan you okay?
“A number of gunmen entered the G4S compound right after the car bomb,” said Najib Danish, an Interior Ministry spokesman.

A complex attack on a well-protected site underlines how insecure Kabul remains despite efforts by the United States and the Afghan government to open peace talks with the Taliban to end more than 17 years of war.

“It is unfortunate and events like this bolster our resolve for peace,” Afghan National Security Advisor Hamdullah Mohib told reporters at the sidelines of a UN-sponsored conference in Geneva where Ghani repeated calls for peace with the Taliban.
10 bodies and 19 wounded have been taken to the city hospitals:
“We can confirm that there has been an incident at one of our locations in Kabul. The situation is ongoing and we are coordinating with Afghan authorities to bring it to a conclusion,” a statement from G4S said.

An official from the public health ministry said at least 10 bodies and 19 wounded had been taken to city hospitals but with clearance operations still going on late into the night, there was no definitive casualty figure.

“There was a bang and right after that, all the windows and ceiling collapsed over the children. All of the doors were shattered,” said Hafizullah, a father who had brought three children to a city hospital. The children were wounded in a house near the contractors’ compound.
 
No mate, I'm dead and logging on to ARRSE through Lucifer's OVERTASK workstation.

In all honesty, I'm fine, thanks for asking. I've never worked for G4S, in Afghanistan or otherwise. I left Afghanistan at the end of September, hopefully never to return, I'm now waiting for my Iraq LOI to be signed off by the Ministry of Oil, so that I can get started on a much better job.
 
Quite. Items 1 thru 1000 on the Taliban agenda is the withdrawal of US forces. Until that is sorted (if it will) there is no chance of talks with Kabul. US forces withdrawal is the key to the peace box.
Not a chance of the Afghan government signing up to that, as soon as NATO were to leave, the Taliban would have all the Afghan MPs doing "strange hanging fruit" impressions all the way along Airport Road.

It'd be turkeys voting for Christmas.
 
Not a chance of the Afghan government signing up to that, as soon as NATO leaves the Taliban would have the Afghan MPs doing "strange hanging fruit" impressions all the way along Airport Road.
The Afghan government doesn't have a choice. The US wants out, that's why they're hurriedly seeking a peace deal. For the Americans, it's about getting out fast and with some dignity in tact.

Agree about the MPs/Government though. They are in for a rude awakening once they are left to fend for themselves. They cant do it now with all the US might/money.
 

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