Afghan Culture

Are their any 'monkey on back' removal specialists in the house? I can't seem to shake this one off.
Easy. Stop posting things which are identifiably mis-informed, then repeating the same error.

Confusing the aims of military 'adventure training' with 'adventure travel' shows all too ckearly that you don't understand the former.

To try to fill in the gaps for you. Military adventure training has a vast range of aims, from experience in logistics and communications to local relations, stress management, multi-tasking, initiative and improvisation, but invariably all conventional adventure training requires elements of leadership and teamwork. There isn't a great deal of either when the trips are solo, as with Lawrence, Bagnold, etc. who like others you mention didn't do any of them when serving in the military.

You really are barking up completely the wrong tree here.
 
Easy. Stop posting things which are identifiably mis-informed, then repeating the same error.

Confusing the aims of military 'adventure training' with 'adventure travel' shows all too ckearly that you don't understand the former.

To try to fill in the gaps for you. Military adventure training has a vast range of aims, from experience in logistics and communications to local relations, stress management, multi-tasking, initiative and improvisation, but invariably all conventional adventure training requires elements of leadership and teamwork. There isn't a great deal of either when the trips are solo, as with Lawrence, Bagnold, etc. who like others you mention didn't do any of them when serving in the military.

You really are barking up completely the wrong tree here.
Yes dear, of course dear.

I don't know what we'd do without you... :rolleyes:
 
I dont suppose the Afghan goatherd I met would have heard of the LRDG, nor of Brig Ralph etc. If he had heard of him he didn't mention it to me - at least the translator didn't mention it.

What we prolly need then, is a British Army Outreach Team (BAOT) to visit these people and educate them into the workings of the British Empire. Fly the flag, so to speak. They could be equipped with solar topees and Earl Grey tea and china teapots in wicker baskets.

Volunteers?
The Top Gear team did well in India, how about sending the new TG team?
 
Easy. Stop posting things which are identifiably mis-informed, then repeating the same error.

Confusing the aims of military 'adventure training' with 'adventure travel' shows all too ckearly that you don't understand the former.

To try to fill in the gaps for you. Military adventure training has a vast range of aims, from experience in logistics and communications to local relations, stress management, multi-tasking, initiative and improvisation, but invariably all conventional adventure training requires elements of leadership and teamwork. There isn't a great deal of either when the trips are solo, as with Lawrence, Bagnold, etc. who like others you mention didn't do any of them when serving in the military.

You really are barking up completely the wrong tree here.
I don't claim to be an expert like yourself but Bagnold had to develop navigation methods, acclimatise/adapt his vehicles, develop sand channels and much else in his explorations.
He had to work out what stores and how much he needed.
I would also suggest that the fact that he was confident enough to do all this showed his leadership abilities.
 
This thread didn't make much sense when I first read it today until I realised that I had John 'GOC GoogleFu' G on ignore.

I'm not going to read his wibble - that's a waste of anyone's time. I can only assume he's lying copiously, self aggrandising and banging a drum about how he's the greatest Officer to have ever lived? One who who has served in every unit and theatre under the sun? Are the youth of today not capable of cleaning his boots?

Am I on the right lines?
 
I don't claim to be an expert like yourself but Bagnold had to develop navigation methods, acclimatise/adapt his vehicles, develop sand channels and much else in his explorations.
He had to work out what stores and how much he needed.
I would also suggest that the fact that he was confident enough to do all this showed his leadership abilities.
You may have overlooked the point I made earlier:

... Brig Bagnold didn't do it "in his day" in the Army but as a civilian or on unpaid / half-paid leave immediately before leaving the Army to become a civilian and do so.
While he certainly did everything you say he DIDN'T do it when adventure training or even when serving, and he had to leave the Army to do it, which makes citing him as an example for "modern British Army adventure training" to follow rather misplaced at best.

... and I'd be interested to know where I "claim to be an expert" - I'm not the one who said "I do know what I'm talking about here, trust me" !
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
This thread didn't make much sense when I first read it today until I realised that I had John 'GOC GoogleFu' G on ignore.

I'm not going to read his wibble - that's a waste of anyone's time. I can only assume he's lying copiously, self aggrandising and banging a drum about how he's the greatest Officer to have ever lived? One who who has served in every unit and theatre under the sun? Are the youth of today not capable of cleaning his boots?

Am I on the right lines?
Yes, as per...
 

Similar threads


Top