ADVICE ON POST WW2 ACTIVITY

Choux Bun

Old-Salt
My Grandfather served in The Royal Horse Guards/Household Cavalry (Blues and Royals) from 1939-1946 as a Tpr Driver/Operator, on Dingo's. Having been transferred in to 2nd Household Cavalry Regiment (2HCR - B Sqn) he landed on Juno Beach in July 1944 and fought with the Regiment through France, Belgium, Holland (including Arnhem) and into Germany. Having been re-designated into the Household Cavalry, he returned to England for demob in 1946.
He only stayed in England briefly and as a civilian returned to the Koln area of Germany (apparently to stay with a German woman). According to documents I have recently obtained from the Household Cavalry Archives at Windsor, this was illegal. I have been able to read correspondence between the Royal Military Police in the UK and Germany calling for his apprehension and the assistance of the German Civil Police. Clearly Grandad was something of an escapologist and wasn't apprehended, he returned to England in early 1947 and as far as anyone in the family is aware had no further involvement with the military or civilian authorities. (This whole episode was only discovered when I obtained the documents from Windsor).
My question is, What did Grandad do that was wrong and to attract the attention of the Military and Civil Police? The only thing I can think of would be fraternisation, but is/was that a crime?
It's too late for me to ask Grandad about his war service and time in Germany, as he died 26yrs ago. No-one else in the family has any clues.
 

Choux Bun

Old-Salt
Your starter for 10 (US dominated) ....


I suspect slipping some frau a length was not so bad, but living out of barracks/billets a bit naughtier.
I would agree but also think you missed the point that he returned to Germany once demobbed, ie. as a civvie. So why would the military authorities be interested?
 
Fraternisation, it was illegal but I think was a military offence. As a civvy, it would not have applied to your granddad, so after an initial hue and cry the authorities probably dropped it
 
I would agree but also think you missed the point that he returned to Germany once demobbed, ie. as a civvie. So why would the military authorities be interested?
Perhaps because Germany was still occupied and the British Zone under the jurisdiction of the British Military Government.
Not the same but similar, in accounts I've read of Australian ex-soldiers returning to Japan because they had to abandon their wives on demob due to Australia's 'White Only' not allowing war brides, they had had to kept a low profile or risk falling foul of the US/AUS occupying powers
 
As @Stanchion has said, civilians in Germany at the time were subject to the jurisdiction of the occupying power. Grandad was probably considered to be offending by fraternising.

Whilst this situation was changed in West Germany, a vestige remained in occupied Berlin. The British Army prosecuted a German civilian in about 1970 for shooting a sentry at the Russian War Memorial in the Brit zone. Brits didn't want to, preferring it to be left to the W. Berlin civil courts, but Ivan insisted.
 
Did his escapades happen to come to your attention when someone came knocking at your door saying - wo ist Opa?
People keen to research their ancestors have to be careful what they wish for. A mate was telling me that in New Zealand, First World War records are largely complete (unlike UK ones - almost all lost during the Blitz) have been digitised and there are numerous stories of researchers finding out that their kindly old war 'ero Grandad, on whose knee they sat as young kids, was a syphilitic, front-line dodging old sod.
 
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Hopkins

Old-Salt
People keen to research their ancestors have to be careful what they wish for. A mate was telling me that in New Zealand, First World War records are largely complete (unlike UK ones - almost all lost during the Blitz) have been digitised and there are numerous stories of researchers finding out that their kindly old war 'ero Grandad, on whose knee they sat as young kids, was a syphilitic, front-line dodging old sod.

 
I suspect that the GDad, when discharged, was released to Class Z Reserve.

These were blokes who had served and would be the first line of Reservists liable for recall if the Government of the day believed that such was necessary*.

It's possible that the terms of Class Z Reserve may have contained a clause relating to immediate return to a former combatant country. Or he was too swift and eager to get back onto the German nest that he hadn't reached his run-out date and was still subject to KRs.



*see Korea: sometimes known as 'alarm clocks' because they ticked (moaned) so much on being hauled back in.
 

Choux Bun

Old-Salt
Did his escapades happen to come to your attention when someone came knocking at your door saying - wo ist Opa?
I've given you a funny for that, but nein!! It came about after starting to research my mother's side of the family for family research.
 

Choux Bun

Old-Salt
I suspect that the GDad, when discharged, was released to Class Z Reserve.

These were blokes who had served and would be the first line of Reservists liable for recall if the Government of the day believed that such was necessary*.

It's possible that the terms of Class Z Reserve may have contained a clause relating to immediate return to a former combatant country. Or he was too swift and eager to get back onto the German nest that he hadn't reached his run-out date and was still subject to KRs.



*see Korea: sometimes known as 'alarm clocks' because they ticked (moaned) so much on being hauled back in.
Thanks for that. He was indeed Released to Class Z Reserve, but I can't find details of any clauses or restrictions preventing him returning to Germany. I checked what documents I have (MOD Service Record and Regimental Records), by all accounts he was an excellent soldier with an exemplary record who had certainly seen some action. He returned to Germany after being demobbed, so he was a civvie.
What I find intriguing is how he found the time to cuddle up with one of the locals, his unit was constantly fully engaged with forward recce and information gathering, but I suppose a chap in his mid twenties with a lull in post war activity (before returning to the UK) could always find a way!!
Some of the posts above have offered a little more detail and added to my learning.
 
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