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Advice for wearing father's medals on the right

Hi members of ARRSE, (great name btw!)

Quick question. Son of recently deceased infantry MBE serviceman (my elderly grandfather is next of kin to my father in legal terms)

I'm.invited to an event summer 2020 which is dinner dress + decorations with a possible HM representative attending. Located on HM's lawn or No11 Lawn. Unconfirmed at this time. Non military event (its academic-related).

I'm wanting to know if wearing on my Right shoulder , my father's military MBE with acorn leaf (for specific action as teamleader of a mission , mentioned in dispatches 1970's action, specifics are on grey edge of a combat situation, but i believe it was ultimately no action seen) plus non-action campaign medals (four in total) is appropriate or verboten. Unsure who is attending event as HM's representative, but likely a royal given location. Unsure if a royal present changes the rules. Have read army handbook (snore).

I am civ in healthcare and reservist noncom (not a full member until late 2020 as it's related to my civilian work, I do not have military dress in my role).

My question is whether it's appropriate to wear dad's mini's in memory at this event, as I'm unsure if that's an official practice or more a Nov 11th civilian tradition.

Thanks in advance for any advice. Can provide pic of mini's on bar if needed for accurate advice for medal combo. My concern is I believe a military MBE is conferred only on the recipient, not descendants, whereas his others are battalion/reg gongs.

Thanks
Nbar067
 
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My concern is I believe a military MBE is conferred only on the recipient, not descendants, whereas his others are battalion/reg gongs.

Thanks
Nbar067

All of which were conferred on the recipient for his service, so no differentiation. Wear them all with pride and remembrance, or don't bother at all; your call.
 
I've never worn my mum or dads medals (Yes mum earned medals and they both saw active service in WW2) but it is up to you.
I've told my lads that they do not have to wear my gongs, in fact, I have advised them against it.
 
Thanks for the replies lads. Very good points made by all.

I think I'll chat to gdad too (retired WO) for his opinion on it. Sounds like he might have some views on the wearing of said medals, given the variety of yays and nays here :)

Might be better off with a regimental pin or something subtle and inkeeping with the events dinner dress code "dinner dress with decoration".

Which I understand means formal wear but not the penguin suit

Thanks again and I'll give it some proper thought.
 
I'm.invited to an event summer 2020 which is dinner dress + decorations

Non military event (its academic-related).

My question is whether it's appropriate to wear dad's mini's in memory at this event, as I'm unsure if that's an official practice or more a Nov 11th civilian tradition.

It's a non military event, and dinner dress and decorations, would indicate, decorations awarded to you.

Save the wearing of your Dad's gongs to Remembrance.
 
Advice for wearing father's shrapnel on the right.
Shrapnel , please have some respect for your late Fathers awards.
Wear them on remembrance sunday , not at a garden party.
Thank you.
 
Thanks for the replies lads. Very good points made by all.

I think I'll chat to gdad too (retired WO) for his opinion on it. Sounds like he might have some views on the wearing of said medals, given the variety of yays and nays here :)

Might be better off with a regimental pin or something subtle and inkeeping with the events dinner dress code "dinner dress with decoration".

Which I understand means formal wear but not the penguin suit

Thanks again and I'll give it some proper thought.
Or put them in your pocket and smile outwardly.
 

Tyk

LE
So your own on your left and fathers/grandfathers on the right but only for remembrance Sunday?

Or potentially at formal events is my understanding, I've damn all idea where my dads medals ended up so I've not faced the issue, but at a variety of events I've seen them worn on the right. One NATO do it was a bit much with some very senior people (serving and retired) from various nations with rather a lot in the ribbons department on Mess Dress and dinner jackets. One with a pale blue with little stars at his neck, which considering I'd had weekly meetings with the bloke for months and had no idea came as a bit of an eye opener.
 
Might be better off with a regimental pin or something subtle and inkeeping with the events dinner dress code "dinner dress with decoration".

That's a bit like the sign on the Underground escalators stating 'Dogs must be carried', it doesn't mean you have to have a dog in order to travel on the escalator.

Likewise, it means on the invitation; If you have your own decorations, you are requested to wear them,

I suggest that you leave the medals at home; for one thing, it will avoid embarrassment.
 
From Army Dress Regulations:

SECTION 2 - METHOD OF WEARING RIBBONS OF ORDERS, DECORATIONS AND MEDALS AND THE DECORATIONS THEMSELVES WEARING OF ORDERS, DECORATIONS, MEDALS AND RIBBONS

13.05 General. Service personnel may only wear on uniform or in civilian clothes orders, decorations, medals, ribbons and emblems awarded to them or approved for them to wear by HM The Queen. This precludes Service personnel from wearing any order, decoration, medal, ribbon or emblem awarded to another whether a friend or relative. Criminal proceedings of fraud may be initiated against Service personnel and civilians who seek to benefit in any way from wearing any order, decoration, medal, ribbon or emblem to which they are not entitled.


The issue for clarification is whether the OP is "Service personnel". I, for one, haven't a clue what he means by a "reservist noncom (not a full member until late 2020...)". I understand provisional rank but I've never come across provisional attestation. Does he have to wait until late 2020 to find out whether he'll get paid for any training he does until then?
 
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Or potentially at formal events is my understanding, I've damn all idea where my dads medals ended up so I've not faced the issue, but at a variety of events I've seen them worn on the right. One NATO do it was a bit much with some very senior people (serving and retired) from various nations with rather a lot in the ribbons department on Mess Dress and dinner jackets. One with a pale blue with little stars at his neck, which considering I'd had weekly meetings with the bloke for months and had no idea came as a bit of an eye opener.

I wouldn’t feel comfortable wearing them, pocket with a photo of them it is.
 
The issue for clarification is whether the OP is "Service personnel". I, for one, haven't a clue what he means by a "reservist noncom (not a full member until late 2020...)". I understand provisional rank but I've never come across provisional attestation. Does he have to wait until late 2020 to find out whether he'll get paid for any training he does until then?

it sounds like he's a reservist who has either formally transferred to the ARRG until such time he returns to normal attendance or he's been give n 'leave of absence' from his unit. Where he stays on the books until either transfer to the ARRG or out.

both are common mechanisms for handling otherwise good Reservists who have either moved jobs or are going to be a bit busy for a period. Ie a period of intense academic study.

@Nbar067 wear your own miniatures. Not full size. If you feel the need take your relative's medals in your pocket but not on your chest. Right chest medals are generally for remembrance and similar commemorative events and generally for the spouse or child. Grand children may be drawing it out a tad.
 
[QUOTE="]
The issue for clarification is whether the OP is "Service personnel". I, for one, haven't a clue what he means by a "reservist noncom (not a full member until late 2020...)". I understand provisional rank but I've never come across provisional attestation. Does he have to wait until late 2020 to find out whether he'll get paid for any training he does until then?
[/QUOTE]

It depends on my civilian qualifications. I'm healthcare but not medic in my day job. Reservist role is dependant on two things - my completion of paramedical quals and my completion of army medical (I have hearing loss technically, but I used a bionic ear to hear, so I can actually pass the army hearing test) (out of interest my day job is working with patients with hearing loss as a clinician) my reservist role is to do same work for military (basically hearing checks) but I have been told to get the medical waiver on my own hearing, I have to upskill to the bottom rug of "Medic" in my spare time - i.e cheapest and quicker way is to do paramedicine training for allied health professionals. Bit chicken and egg - one has to come first before the other.

Maybe I'm using wrong language to describe as a noncom (not a full member until 2020). You are right I'm not able to be paid for the reserves work until i have the certificate of medical training in hand (late 2020) and be waived for my own hearing (I'd pretty much be flying a desk in the reserves because we sit and test hearing loss in a sound booth, but as we know reserves do have to be able to be deployed if required) but I attend my reserve training already in a unofficial I guess capacity (mostly fitness related atm) as a "pledge" for lack of better word.

I've mostly signed up because of family history, and I cannot be a full services with the medical waiver. I suspect my family history of military is part and parcel of the provisional acceptance/offer. And my willingness to upskill to simple paramedic as a non medic civilian is the compensatory cherry for mod regs.
Hope that clarifies
 

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