Adverse conditions - Personal resilience, lack of and how would you manage?

Yokel

LE
I still think that practical skills and the instinct to do things for yourself is more important than literature, however, I did write:

A long time ago, on a different forum (I cannot remember which) I remember a discussion with @halo_jones in which she mentioned the works of Robert Heinlein (I think) and we concluded there was a need for fiction with a heroic narrative, with protagonists that the reader can identify with and recognise and emulate their heroic qualities.

Historical stories serve the same purpose - they tell us where we came from and offers examples that we might emulate.


From here.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
A few hints here....
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I live on an island hit by super-typhoon Kai on 16th December 2021. Sustained wind speeds of 160mph for over a minute were punctuated with mere 90mph periods. We were without power, as were 490k other residences, out of communication with the rest of the world, and that means you only have the money in your pocket until power is restored, no phone, no internet, no clean water, blocked roads, five smaller typhoons that rolled in over the next ten days.
We got our power back on 17th January 2022, here in the city, although at our farm in the province the nearest town is cut off due to roads and bridges swept away by the storm surge so access is by boat. All our animals were killed, all our fruit trees and coconut palms are down or stripped of branches and no restoration of power until late March, according to estimates.
We managed, and we took in neighbours who lost everything. There are always those worse off, so what we have gone through is nothing compared to those on Tonga.
It seems that peeps in third world countries are more resilient than those in the West.

I was, however, rolling my eyes in exasperation at the 'Relief complicated by Covid' and that ridiculous creature of a PM in NZ spinning the Tonga disaster to ramp up Covid issues.
 

Londo

LE
I live on an island hit by super-typhoon Kai on 16th December 2021. Sustained wind speeds of 160mph for over a minute were punctuated with mere 90mph periods. We were without power, as were 490k other residences, out of communication with the rest of the world, and that means you only have the money in your pocket until power is restored, no phone, no internet, no clean water, blocked roads, five smaller typhoons that rolled in over the next ten days.
We got our power back on 17th January 2022, here in the city, although at our farm in the province the nearest town is cut off due to roads and bridges swept away by the storm surge so access is by boat. All our animals were killed, all our fruit trees and coconut palms are down or stripped of branches and no restoration of power until late March, according to estimates.
We managed, and we took in neighbours who lost everything. There are always those worse off, so what we have gone through is nothing compared to those on Tonga.
It seems that peeps in third world countries are more resilient than those in the West.

I was, however, rolling my eyes in exasperation at the 'Relief complicated by Covid' and that ridiculous creature of a PM in NZ spinning the Tonga disaster to ramp up Covid issues.
Shame about your animals and loosing all that hard work you put in on your farm .
Main thing is you and yours are still alive and as the services get back to normal things will get better .
I wish you well in getting it all back to as things were mate .
 
Okay, if you are making your way to the Tesco Express and encounter a bear cub..... RUN!

I know. They're buggers, aren't they? They just stand in front of the reduced section and nobody can get past them until they've cleared the shelves of all the good stuff.
 

Londo

LE
I know. They're buggers, aren't they? They just stand in front of the reduced section and nobody can get past them until they've cleared the shelves of all the good stuff.
Plus if your in a wooded Tesco's they tend to crap everywhere .

( A bit like the sweets aisle at the Brixton Woolworths I refused to work there a second day , Don't think it was bears though . Just kids never been potty trained )
 
Plus if your in a wooded Tesco's they tend to crap everywhere .

( A bit like the sweets aisle at the Brixton Woolworths I refused to work there a second day , Don't think it was bears though . Just kids never been potty trained )

"Just bag it, son, put it on the shelves next to the Vegemite, and put a 90p sticker on it. No one will know the difference."
 

Londo

LE
"Just bag it, son, put it on the shelves next to the Vegemite, and put a 90p sticker on it. No one will know the difference."
Didn't think of that at the time :-D
 
I live on an island hit by super-typhoon Kai on 16th December 2021. Sustained wind speeds of 160mph for over a minute were punctuated with mere 90mph periods. We were without power, as were 490k other residences, out of communication with the rest of the world, and that means you only have the money in your pocket until power is restored, no phone, no internet, no clean water, blocked roads, five smaller typhoons that rolled in over the next ten days.
We got our power back on 17th January 2022, here in the city, although at our farm in the province the nearest town is cut off due to roads and bridges swept away by the storm surge so access is by boat. All our animals were killed, all our fruit trees and coconut palms are down or stripped of branches and no restoration of power until late March, according to estimates.
We managed, and we took in neighbours who lost everything. There are always those worse off, so what we have gone through is nothing compared to those on Tonga.
It seems that peeps in third world countries are more resilient than those in the West.

I was, however, rolling my eyes in exasperation at the 'Relief complicated by Covid' and that ridiculous creature of a PM in NZ spinning the Tonga disaster to ramp up Covid issues.

4:12, the new build evacuation centre roof, then walls, coming apart in seconds, give an idea of the power. 20:58, the family in remains of their destroyed home, crouched under the table to shelter from the elements and flying debris, still joking, is resilience,
No one wailing and wringing hands in the aftermath.... well, no locals anyway, just western hipster types with contrived click-bait title pics of the melodrama variety.
To me, the scariest experiences out here are earthquakes, no met office to give warnings of those, having said that this was my second super typhoon and there is no defence against nature. The latest woke wannabe degree (now that History is being flogged to death) is Environmental Science, because we all know that composting counteracts 8B peeps exhaling.
 

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