Adverse conditions - Personal resilience, lack of and how would you manage?

And looking to the future when electric cars rule the world, all these useless fecks would be stuck indoors as their cars couldn't be charged. Surely the energy companies could lay underground cables and if you want to live in the wilderness you bloody well pay to be connected! :cool:

One thing about electric cars is if one is fully charged the night before that's a massive battery that could power the house for a while, as long as you didn't use the oven, if the wiring was set up to allow it.

Of course once it's gone it's gone, no walking to the filling station with a jerrycan. Hybrids make massively more sense for that reason, but they don't have as big batteries in them as pure electrics.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
I listen to Radio 4. Not sure why, it drives me absolutely ******* mad with frothing fury every day, but I can't stand the ******* who consider themselves to be DJs nowadays on other channels,, so this will do for now.

I was listening with interesting and said fury at a couple on the phone talking about Storm Arwen and how they were really struggling. In a nutshell:

1. Spring water supplies their taps, filtered via UV light. No leccy, no UV, thus water not safe to drink.
If a dirty Afghan well can hydrate a squadron of men with nothing more than a slack handful of pocket sized hand filtration pumps, why can't they manage likewise?

2. Explained that their elderly pensioner neighbours had generators so were okay, because they had lived there long enough to know how likely a power cut was. If some old OAP fart can have the sense to have a generator, why didn't these people?

3. Costing a fortune in buying wood for the log burner. What the actual ****. Trees. You silly cnuts.

4. Whine whine moan moan. etc.

I then read on the BBC about a couple who said they were getting fed from a burger van that their local MP had sorted, but they were moaning that they were Pescatarians (Is that how you spell it? Looks funny for a word pronounced 'cnuts') so they've only been eating the chips. Hungry and cold, these ******* muppets were still refusing to eat proper meat because of some made up belief. Thank god they never found themselves in the Soviet hinterland during the famines.

There just seems to be a real problem around people preparing for the worst. I don't mean this in a mad prepper sort of way, but just having the basics to survive or deal with a situation. That includes storm isolation, flooding, etc. At what point did we become so reliant on the help of others and lose our way in being able to supply and protect ourselves?

Add in to that various other gripes and moans from people who seem to have no resilience in the face of adversity, it makes me wonder WTF would happen in an actual disaster scenario. Putting aside the inevitable rampage of people robbing those who had stocked up etc, and not about prepping, what do you have in your house right now that you could rely on in the event of a severe weather incident that saw your trapped without power? Our US brethern need not respond because you're all ******* insane and probably have fully kitted bunkers, you mad bastards (I'm just jealous).

To start:

1. 150 self-heating meals (this is a temporary thing, not a usual feature. I just happened to come in to possession of them. Several trays of tinned food (from Covid era), a large tattie patch and two children, edible when cooked
2. 20L of petrol and 20L of diesel
3. Hand tools, blood stained but functional for cutting of, to provide fuel or repair (hahah)
4. Several boxes of matches
5. Bag of tea light candles
6. Several dozen AA and AAA batteries
7. A fast flowing stream nearby. Nothing to filter it other than a few reams of A4 paper and kitchen cloths, but enough to make it reasonably safer for drinking if boiled
8. A burning waste bin in the garden
9. Bags of charcoal and a BBQ

So give some examples of what, if you were stuck in your house for a week, you would have to hand to make life easier / survive.

The only addition I was thinking of was a Jackery powerbank or something similar, just so I could keep the deep freeze running, for example.
I feel really sorry for the people without electricity for many days but a lot of them just can't be bothered to prepare. Yes, it's great to be able to press a switch, or even call out a command, to fulfill your needs but sometimes, just sometimes, it comes down to the five (or six) P's doesn't it?
 
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Chef

LE
Living in that there London restricts one a bit as regards living off the land, having said which we have a few days spare rations, a wedge of camping kit and a functioning open fire, so all in all we'd manage.

Back in the days of the random power cuts and the four day week, the family pile had a gas fire in one room, another wedge of camping kit and an Aladdin stove. Throw in lots of candles and we survived that one too. Plus I learned to play cribbage.
 
Way back when before I moved to suburbia I lived way out in the boonies up in the Pennines.

Always a ton of coal in the coal shed, range in the sitting room complete with oven and back boiler.
Honda generator in the barn with enough fuel for a week.
Range Rover on the drive

Never had the slightest problem.
If shit got really rough with the weather the Jaguar stayed on the drive and the bike in the barn.

The only real problem I ever had was water and waste pipes freezing.

Live out in the hills, plan for nature to be unco-operative.
 
Live out in the hills, plan for nature to be unco-operative.

Couldn't agree more. Also the learning curve is a very steep one as we found out when we first moved to where we live now.
 

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Here in Ottawa we are expected to be prepared

Emergency preparedness | City of Ottawa

Not that it doesn’t result in people being surprised as we have heat waves in summer and ice storms in winter- EVERY ******* YEAR
 
I feel really sorry for the people without electricity for many days but a lot of them just can't be bothered to prepare. Yes, it's great to be able to press a switch, or even call out a command, to fulfill your needs but sometimes, just sometimes, it comes down to the five (or six) P's doesn't it?
Unless you are like my Father, 92 and full on Alzheimer’s. If it wasn’t for his neighbour (himself 75) Dad would be snookered.
Apparently I could put him on the register at the electricity company as a vulnerable customer. But I don’t know how he’d cope with a stranger at the door.
 

MR_R_SOLE

Old-Salt
One thing about electric cars is if one is fully charged the night before that's a massive battery that could power the house for a while, as long as you didn't use the oven, if the wiring was set up to allow it.

Of course once it's gone it's gone, no walking to the filling station with a jerrycan. Hybrids make massively more sense for that reason, but they don't have as big batteries in them as pure electrics.

The electrical system for that alone would be prohibitley expensive for most. Off the top of my head. A DC to AC inverter. A couple of isolators. A disconnection of DNO supply. An ATS to reconnect the DNo supply as when power is avaliable again.

A Geni set is far more sensible and easier to maintain.
 
Unless you are like my Father, 92 and full on Alzheimer’s. If it wasn’t for his neighbour (himself 75) Dad would be snookered.
Apparently I could put him on the register at the electricity company as a vulnerable customer. But I don’t know how he’d cope with a stranger at the door
Putting him on the register but get it notated that first contact is through a person known and trusted to him.
I am a nominated contact for someone.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Unless you are like my Father, 92 and full on Alzheimer’s. If it wasn’t for his neighbour (himself 75) Dad would be snookered.
Apparently I could put him on the register at the electricity company as a vulnerable customer. But I don’t know how he’d cope with a stranger at the door.
You can also set up a password system, obviously with his condition that might be futile.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Unless you are like my Father, 92 and full on Alzheimer’s. If it wasn’t for his neighbour (himself 75) Dad would be snookered.
Apparently I could put him on the register at the electricity company as a vulnerable customer. But I don’t know how he’d cope with a stranger at the door.
I don't want to pry but does your dear old Dad live alone without any official help?
 
I have a small generator, a Kipor 2.6kva, that will not power the whole house but would do a couple of rooms if not the entire bottom floor or the top floor on it’s own. Might have to be a bit frugal with what I plug in. Kipor are very similar to Honda generators but without quite a such huge price tag.

It’s very quite to run and it will supply power to computers and printers without damaging them. It’s in a suitcase sized case which is moulded plastic with a carrying handle. It’s light enough to carry reasonably short distances of maybe a hundred yards if you really need to without pulling your arms out of their sockets.

It’s a pull cord starter and in my experience is reliable enough. It runs on petrol. I pulled it out of a damp old shed recently where it had sat for probably three years without being touched and it started on the second or third pull and ran as if it had been on a weeks holiday without doing anything.

I brought it originally for supplying power to a marquee for doing trade shows and craft fairs for the picture framing. However with one thing and another including covid, I haven’t actually done anything although I do have the marquee as well. A 6x3 metre pop up gazebo.

The generator would definitely come in handy in an emergency if the power disappeared although living in West London, nobody would be more surprised than me if I ever had to use it.

If I lived out in the sticks a bit where a power cut might be more likely though, I’d probably have two of them in the shed. They’re about £500 a pop so not outrageously expensive.
 
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I don't want to pry but does your dear old Dad live alone without any official help?
Council carers come twice a day. During the storm they didn't visit for two days. But ask Dad if he's seen anyone - he'll tell you he hasn't seen anyone for weeks. He also tells me he swims in the sea every day, takes his two Great Danes for a five mile walk and Raquel Welch lives next door.
 
I listen to Radio 4. Not sure why, it drives me absolutely ******* mad with frothing fury every day, but I can't stand the ******* who consider themselves to be DJs nowadays on other channels,, so this will do for now.

I was listening with interesting and said fury at a couple on the phone talking about Storm Arwen and how they were really struggling. In a nutshell:

1. Spring water supplies their taps, filtered via UV light. No leccy, no UV, thus water not safe to drink.
If a dirty Afghan well can hydrate a squadron of men with nothing more than a slack handful of pocket sized hand filtration pumps, why can't they manage likewise?

2. Explained that their elderly pensioner neighbours had generators so were okay, because they had lived there long enough to know how likely a power cut was. If some old OAP fart can have the sense to have a generator, why didn't these people?

3. Costing a fortune in buying wood for the log burner. What the actual ****. Trees. You silly cnuts.

4. Whine whine moan moan. etc.

I then read on the BBC about a couple who said they were getting fed from a burger van that their local MP had sorted, but they were moaning that they were Pescatarians (Is that how you spell it? Looks funny for a word pronounced 'cnuts') so they've only been eating the chips. Hungry and cold, these ******* muppets were still refusing to eat proper meat because of some made up belief. Thank god they never found themselves in the Soviet hinterland during the famines.

There just seems to be a real problem around people preparing for the worst. I don't mean this in a mad prepper sort of way, but just having the basics to survive or deal with a situation. That includes storm isolation, flooding, etc. At what point did we become so reliant on the help of others and lose our way in being able to supply and protect ourselves?

Add in to that various other gripes and moans from people who seem to have no resilience in the face of adversity, it makes me wonder WTF would happen in an actual disaster scenario. Putting aside the inevitable rampage of people robbing those who had stocked up etc, and not about prepping, what do you have in your house right now that you could rely on in the event of a severe weather incident that saw your trapped without power? Our US brethern need not respond because you're all ******* insane and probably have fully kitted bunkers, you mad bastards (I'm just jealous).

To start:

1. 150 self-heating meals (this is a temporary thing, not a usual feature. I just happened to come in to possession of them. Several trays of tinned food (from Covid era), a large tattie patch and two children, edible when cooked
2. 20L of petrol and 20L of diesel
3. Hand tools, blood stained but functional for cutting of, to provide fuel or repair (hahah)
4. Several boxes of matches
5. Bag of tea light candles
6. Several dozen AA and AAA batteries
7. A fast flowing stream nearby. Nothing to filter it other than a few reams of A4 paper and kitchen cloths, but enough to make it reasonably safer for drinking if boiled
8. A burning waste bin in the garden
9. Bags of charcoal and a BBQ

So give some examples of what, if you were stuck in your house for a week, you would have to hand to make life easier / survive.

The only addition I was thinking of was a Jackery powerbank or something similar, just so I could keep the deep freeze running, for example.
3 rain water water butts in the garden, total capacity about 100 Gallons. A 3kva petrol generator. and a can of petrol. 100 tealights. many many batteries. ditto assorted torches. 3 fitted Emergency lights in the house (3 hour rated) . large old fashioned Calor 4Kw gas heater+ 2 x 25 Ltr gas containers, about 2 weeks worth of food which is rotated monthly. Single ring portable gas camping cooker + about a dozen gas canisters. Loft well insulated, all windows double glazed, and 3 treble glazed. If pushed a open hearth fire, with fake fibre coal which at a pinch can be fired up with mains gas. ( Not used for a few years., kept as it looks the bollocks) We live in a semi rural area, and do get the occasional power cuts, the last one lasted 90 minutes.

All the above not collected for a possible doomsday scenario, just that over the years all items bought one at a time to do a certain job, collectively they will get us out of the shit if there is any prolonged weather disaster like that has hit the north and Scotland.

The EM lights, fitted because we had 6 children in the house, now all flown, the generator was used by me on site where no other power was available, stocks of food, 6 kids in the house, old habits etc, and the gas heater, well, our first home when first married, single glazed Victorian terraced rabbit hutch, with no central heating, so, collectively, now, today all kept and all on standby for seeing out the worst the weather can throw at us.

Basic common sense, Up here for thinking, down there for dancing.............Guv! ;)
 
Shit, I’m well behind the curve on this. It’s something I should have put more thought towards.

I’ve got an old air rifle and a tin of pellets.

A wood/coal stove in the house. Heaps of coal and wood.

A few candles.

A dart board.

A push bike from Halfords.

But that’s it really. My kids eat through food like a hungry battlegroup rolling through a load of range stew filled norjies. Fat little cnuts.

I think I need to get a plan together.

I feel like a cnut now for laughing at them people buying loads of toilet roll during the lockdown.
 
Of course if it was to happen tomorrow I'd just step outside to the propane heated and solar charged caravan, fire up the blown air heating and switch the telly on

There enough food in the larder for around 6 weeks and enough single malt for a year or so (not that I actually drink)

No point in making life hard
 
Mrs R wise weather woman made us get a double load of wood for the burner this winter. The burner has a flat top, so can heat food. We have a cupboard full of tins/pasta/rice.
The camping stove (with gas bottles on standby) is ready to go.
The birds have eaten all the berries on the front garden yew tree, hence, “winter draws on”.
We live in south Hampshire.
You may scoff, but the last time we had a significant freeze, our village was knackered for a week. A big hill, ice, and the bus not going down makes a big difference. And we are prone to power cuts, and the mobile signal is shit.
Our neighbour is bed-bound and in palliative care. So you got to think about others, too.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I listen to Radio 4. Not sure why, it drives me absolutely ******* mad with frothing fury every day, but I can't stand the ******* who consider themselves to be DJs nowadays on other channels,, so this will do for now.

I was listening with interesting and said fury at a couple on the phone talking about Storm Arwen and how they were really struggling. In a nutshell:

1. Spring water supplies their taps, filtered via UV light. No leccy, no UV, thus water not safe to drink.
If a dirty Afghan well can hydrate a squadron of men with nothing more than a slack handful of pocket sized hand filtration pumps, why can't they manage likewise?

2. Explained that their elderly pensioner neighbours had generators so were okay, because they had lived there long enough to know how likely a power cut was. If some old OAP fart can have the sense to have a generator, why didn't these people?

3. Costing a fortune in buying wood for the log burner. What the actual ****. Trees. You silly cnuts.

4. Whine whine moan moan. etc.

I then read on the BBC about a couple who said they were getting fed from a burger van that their local MP had sorted, but they were moaning that they were Pescatarians (Is that how you spell it? Looks funny for a word pronounced 'cnuts') so they've only been eating the chips. Hungry and cold, these ******* muppets were still refusing to eat proper meat because of some made up belief. Thank god they never found themselves in the Soviet hinterland during the famines.

There just seems to be a real problem around people preparing for the worst. I don't mean this in a mad prepper sort of way, but just having the basics to survive or deal with a situation. That includes storm isolation, flooding, etc. At what point did we become so reliant on the help of others and lose our way in being able to supply and protect ourselves?

Add in to that various other gripes and moans from people who seem to have no resilience in the face of adversity, it makes me wonder WTF would happen in an actual disaster scenario. Putting aside the inevitable rampage of people robbing those who had stocked up etc, and not about prepping, what do you have in your house right now that you could rely on in the event of a severe weather incident that saw your trapped without power? Our US brethern need not respond because you're all ******* insane and probably have fully kitted bunkers, you mad bastards (I'm just jealous).

To start:

1. 150 self-heating meals (this is a temporary thing, not a usual feature. I just happened to come in to possession of them. Several trays of tinned food (from Covid era), a large tattie patch and two children, edible when cooked
2. 20L of petrol and 20L of diesel
3. Hand tools, blood stained but functional for cutting of, to provide fuel or repair (hahah)
4. Several boxes of matches
5. Bag of tea light candles
6. Several dozen AA and AAA batteries
7. A fast flowing stream nearby. Nothing to filter it other than a few reams of A4 paper and kitchen cloths, but enough to make it reasonably safer for drinking if boiled
8. A burning waste bin in the garden
9. Bags of charcoal and a BBQ

So give some examples of what, if you were stuck in your house for a week, you would have to hand to make life easier / survive.

The only addition I was thinking of was a Jackery powerbank or something similar, just so I could keep the deep freeze running, for example.

I live in a 400 year old house on a farm.

The heating and hot water is provided by burning biomass wood chips but I reckon I could frig it to run on any kind of wood. Depending on how far we are through a container of chips, we’ve got between 1 and 6 weeks worth of heat before I need to start chopping down trees and modifying the boiler.

We go camping quite a lot so have a fair supply of gas stoves and the like. Likewise tents, doss bags, warm clothing etc.

With the exception of electric lighting in the house, our day to day existence probably isn’t that far off how things were a few hundred years back.

I’ve mentioned before that it’s a 20 plus mile round trip to the nearest supermarket, this means we tend to buy in bulk, simply because we don’t have the luxury of just nipping to the shops for a loaf of bread. I reckon we’ve got a good 2 months worth of bog roll, cleaning products and dry or tinned food before we even need to consider killing any of the farm animals.

Tools and machinery wise, we have everything you’d expect for a farm of this size, including chainsaws, two Landrovers, a skid steer, quad bike and a tractor with about 2 IBCs of red diesel.

I also have enough shotguns and ammo to equip everyone in the household, plus a couple of rifles.

I’m probably short of candles and petrol. If I needed to last a few weeks I reckon I’d run out of these things first, but I’ve definitely got enough for a week.

Where we would really suffer is milking goats. We milk over 100 goats twice a day using electrical machinery and then have a hefty refrigerated tank to keep the milk in.

We don’t have resilient power for this and it would need a pretty big generator to run.

We could take the hit on the spoiled milk, but there are too many goats to milk by hand and you can’t just stop milking them or they’ll get mastitis and other health problems.

I expect we’d lose a lot of them unless we resorted to hand milking which would be a full time job for the entire family and would get very boring very quickly.

Certainly food for thought. I had never really considered this before. Looks like we might have to start shopping for a genny.
 

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