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adsc ibuprofen tablets

#1
I have selection for paras 4th Feb and have some severe shin splints will i be allowed to take a couple of ibuprofen tablets an hour before the 1.5 run they seem to hold the pain off very well.
 
#3
Probably not, but nobody can stop you having them in your pocket. Nobody will offer any sympathy, you're either fit for it or you're not in the military's eyes.

I trust you will address the problem causing your shin splints after selection?
 
#4
I have a mild-ish case of the splints and I know how fucking annoying they are. RICE to the letter, and rather than taking Ibuprofen, use the topical gel (get it from Boots for about £3-£4), as this is dissolved directly into your anterior tibialis, rather than 95% of what you took orally going around the body.

Just use compression bandages when your out doing your day-to-day routine, this really helps. Do leg raises up against the wall and stretch your calfs regularly.

Run on grass/across fields etc to try and take some strain off your shins.

Good luck at selection.
 
D

Dom1983

Guest
#5
jimmi1 said:
I have selection for paras 4th Feb and have some severe shin splints will i be allowed to take a couple of ibuprofen tablets an hour before the 1.5 run they seem to hold the pain off very well.
tbh mate if i had shin splints i wouldnt even consider taking selection! you really should wait a few months and get it sorted before you start, you will be much better of in the long run.

Shin splints for some people tend to come back even when they think they have got rid of it. ive no experience of it, but Para training will be tough, especially on your legs. the last thing you want is to manage the pain and get through something easy like ADSC then have the condition get worse.
 
#6
I am with Dom on this one. Pain is there to warn you that there is something wrong. If you cover it up with painkillers you will only push yourself too far and possibly cause long term damage.

Imagine this: The painkillers may get you through selection but you could then be too injured to do the course.

Fix first.
 
#7
I'm just resting my legs now with lots of ice and compression my run time isn't the best 9.30 hopefully my legs will be healed for selection and i will give it everything i got on the run,if i fail i will probably just get 3 months deferral
 
#9
5.56mm i was just doing hard short runs 1.5-2 miles never really do long runs i think when i found out i had my interview i boosted my speed as i knew it woudnt be long till adsc and thats what gave me the splints.
 
#11
tochy01 said:
Shinsplint's are usually caused by lack of arch in footwear. You can buy inserts for your trainers, but it is not a quick fix problem and if ur determined to get into the para's then a few months of waiting shouldn't hurt. http://www.footinsoles.co.uk/shin.htm. Have a look on here it will be a great help good luck.

Are you a doctor? No.

To the guy with shin splints. What are you a baby? A coupleof months healing is nothing. Show some sense and patience.

Use that time to read up properly on shin splints and running technique.

It seems you are looking to tamp down symptoms and not cure yourself. With that kind of attitude you're not going to be any use to anyone.

I don't think gimping about on pain killers pulling pain faces is going to go over well is it? Not much of start to your army reputation is it?
 
#12
jimmi1 said:
5.56mm i was just doing hard short runs 1.5-2 miles never really do long runs i think when i found out i had my interview i boosted my speed as i knew it woudnt be long till adsc and thats what gave me the splints.
A bit of advice: It is no use going to selection with an injury that is going to hinder you. Painkillers will cover the pain up, yes. But you don't want to go to depot with an injury because it will only make training harder than it already is.
 
#13
jarrod248 said:
duckiciao said:
I have a mild-ish case of the splints and I know how fucking annoying they are. RICE to the letter, and rather than taking Ibuprofen, use the topical gel (get it from Boots for about £3-£4), as this is dissolved directly into your anterior tibialis, rather than 95% of what you took orally going around the body.

Just use compression bandages when your out doing your day-to-day routine, this really helps. Do leg raises up against the wall and stretch your calfs regularly.

Run on grass/across fields etc to try and take some strain off your shins.

Good luck at selection.
So a topical gel is absorbed into the skin and goes where? Think before you post.

Uhhh, whut? Me no comprende...
 
#16
jarrod248 said:
duckiciao said:
I have a mild-ish case of the splints and I know how fucking annoying they are. RICE to the letter, and rather than taking Ibuprofen, use the topical gel (get it from Boots for about �3-�4), as this is dissolved directly into your anterior tibialis, rather than 95% of what you took orally going around the body.

Just use compression bandages when your out doing your day-to-day routine, this really helps. Do leg raises up against the wall and stretch your calfs regularly.

Run on grass/across fields etc to try and take some strain off your shins.

Good luck at selection.
So a topical gel is absorbed into the skin and goes where? Think before you post.
It get absorbed directly to the effected area. Much better than taking a few tablets and only 5% going to the right place with the remaining 95% going to your left nipple and other non-ouchy places.
 
#17
I had severe shin splint last week, I went to a physio who made a big difference massaging it.

I had selection yesterday and got through it ok with no shin pain before or after!! Although

Get a sports therapist to massage your shins, rest and ice the days leading upto selection......It seemed to work for me!
 
#18
Honestly? Brutally?

If your suffering Shin splints -now- and havent even started basic, you are going to have a lot of issues when on your CFT's. Get the issue sorted -before- you go to selection. If the MO discovers you have a tendancy for stress fractures and lower limb injuries, you wont even get a chance to do the selection, as the medical process needs to be passed before you can do a single press-up.

As said in earlier posts; be patient. Take as long as necessary to heal up and find the source of the problem (Flat feet, bad footwear or whatever). Even if it postpones your Military career for a few years, saves on crippling yourself after a few years into it.

~AIP
 
#19
Pacifist_Jihadist said:
jarrod248 said:
duckiciao said:
I have a mild-ish case of the splints and I know how fucking annoying they are. RICE to the letter, and rather than taking Ibuprofen, use the topical gel (get it from Boots for about �3-�4), as this is dissolved directly into your anterior tibialis, rather than 95% of what you took orally going around the body.

Just use compression bandages when your out doing your day-to-day routine, this really helps. Do leg raises up against the wall and stretch your calfs regularly.

Run on grass/across fields etc to try and take some strain off your shins.

Good luck at selection.
So a topical gel is absorbed into the skin and goes where? Think before you post.
It get absorbed directly to the effected area. Much better than taking a few tablets and only 5% going to the right place with the remaining 95% going to your left nipple and other non-ouchy places.

Uhm.. or not? the painkillers are not going to just magically heal the effected area, they have to go into the bloodstream first anyway. Thus, it's just the same as taking painkillers, except that it fools gullible people like you lot into spending more money!
 
#20
Whilst at uni I briefly looked into this subject and the papers I read suggested that ibuprofen gel has similar efficacy to oral ibuprofen. However they also said that associated symptoms were decreased in topical use.
The BMJ (british medical journal) said that they didnt know which form worked best but once again reported reduced associated side affects with the topical treatment as 'less of the drug is absorbed into the bloodstream'.

mcclurg you are very cocky for a cadet......no, hold on...........

jimmi1, just use what works best for you, alot of the benefits of drugs are psychological anyway...if you think it works you will notice improvement.

c
 

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