ADSC Glencorse Experience

Jamo91

Crow
Alright ladive got my assessment on 10th of jan starting to feel nervous about it now. Does anyone have any helpful tips for me and is anyone at glencorse on these dates? Cheers
 

JNM

War Hero
Alright ladive got my assessment on 10th of jan starting to feel nervous about it now. Does anyone have any helpful tips for me and is anyone at glencorse on these dates? Cheers
I’m not I did mine in Nov. Best advice is effort, do your best, do as you’re told and you’ll be reyt.
 
Alright ladive got my assessment on 10th of jan starting to feel nervous about it now. Does anyone have any helpful tips for me and is anyone at glencorse on these dates? Cheers
I've got mine on the 25th of Jan, feeling quite comfortable with it just need to up my running. From what I've read on here everyone just says Prep, make sure you're hittinf targets, be confident and rock up to Glencorse in a Suit, not jeans.
 

TamH70

MIA
Not a wah. I used to be in the Signals myself. My trade's long gone though - I was a Class 2 Telecommunications Operator (Telegraph) - and I was one of the last guys who had to learn Morse Code.
 

JNM

War Hero
Not a wah. I used to be in the Signals myself. My trade's long gone though - I was a Class 2 Telecommunications Operator (Telegraph) - and I was one of the last guys who had to learn Morse Code.
Don’t they teach it anymore? Thought it’d be useful.
 

TamH70

MIA
Don’t they teach it anymore? Thought it’d be useful.
Not as far as I was told back in the late Nineties - there was no perceived need for it. Secret squirrel types may have to learn it but it was out of date for most folks in the Signals T.A. At least when I was in, and when I was attached to the Regulars l didn't use it either.
 

JNM

War Hero
Not as far as I was told back in the late Nineties - there was no perceived need for it. Secret squirrel types may have to learn it but it was out of date for most folks in the Signals T.A. At least when I was in, and when I was attached to the Regulars l didn't use it either.
Guess the situations where you’d use it would be very rare but shouldn’t take much time to throw it into signals training.
 
Not a wah. I used to be in the Signals myself. My trade's long gone though - I was a Class 2 Telecommunications Operator (Telegraph) - and I was one of the last guys who had to learn Morse Code.
My father did the same role as you in the late nineties as well! Small world I guess
 

greengirlgee

Swinger
Hello everyone! I'm here to provide a detailed account of my experience at Glencorse Assessment Centre, as it was quite different from what I'd read on this thread and elsewhere online, and was different from what I expected. As my name suggests, I am female, hence why I believe my experience was different (?). Mainly, I found the staff to be much more relaxed and helpful than I expected, and this made our experience pretty enjoyable and put us at all ease.

Night 1
Anyway, I arrived at the train station ready to be picked up in the late evening. What threw me was the fact there were no other males in sight as we boarded the coach. The Staff introduced themselves and told us what would be happening over the next 2 and a half days. One of them explained that everything we do, how we conduct ourselves over the next few days, and how we act with our fellow candidates would be watched and assessed. He then announced the dreaded word 'Icebreaker' - however, this was only an informal chat with the person sat next to you on the coach who you'd already spoken to and got to know anyway. There would be no standing up and introducing yourself and your new best mate later on once we had arrived at the AC, as I had previously read. Apparently this was 'too scary' and created 'too much pressure' for new candidates. I then had to ask, 'where are the males?' - he explained that ever since a young candidate was caught in the toilets of the opposite sex doing something they shouldn't have with a fellow candidate, males and females are completely segregated in the AC (this was good news, as I couldn't have matched up to male candidates physically). We arrived at the AC and gathered in the main Reception area, where we picked up our urine pots and our number tag. We were taken to a computer room to log onto our portals (make sure you know your username and password - the Staff were undoubtedly annoyed at those who didn't know theirs) to check everything was in working order. We were then taken into a presentation room, talked through in more detail what would be happening, and given a clipboard, pencil and paperwork to fill in later on. We were then shown to our rooms - under 18's were in a separate room to over 18's, and again I was surprised at the age majority of under 18's. There were only 3 candidates out of 20 above the age of 21, with one being 30. On the beds were the duvets/covers/pillows etc. all laid out in a specific order, and folded in a specific way. Take note of this, as when it is time to change the bedsheets, they must be laid out in exactly the same way down in Reception. Once we had settled in, the Staff came in and told us what time we were to be down at Reception in the morning - I think this was 5:45am. He told us that they do not turn out the lights at 22:00, and that we were all adults and could choose when we wanted to go to sleep (was this a test? now I think about it maybe it was). We spent that evening filling in our paperwork and getting to know each other; you'll find that you get on immediately with everyone and that all of your worries are shared ones, although there is really nothing to worry about.

Day 1
Annoyingly, some girls set their alarms for 5am to give themselves enough time to straighten their hair (I'd recommend taking earplugs). The showers are also cold at that hour, but a cold shower does wonders for waking up the brain. We then went for a stroll down to the cookhouse, which was empty. A full English fry-up is served along with cereals and juice. After breakfast we were taken for our Medical - now, here is where it gets interesting. As I was a higher number candidate thanks to my alphabetically placed surname, I had to wait a VERY long time for my medical. So long in fact that I was taken along with 4 others to do the bag lift, jerry-can carry AND computer assessment all before 11am on Day 1. By the time I returned, some girls were still waiting for their medicals. I was called in first for an ECG - being a female, this can be rather awkward. I was not expecting this, but you are required to remove your top and bra whilst the practitioner does the assessment. Luckily it doesn't last longer than 10 minutes. Next is an eye test and colour perception test - if you wear glasses you are told to remove them at first and told to read the letter board. I am -2.75 in both eyes and couldn't see a thing, but I was told this was absolutely fine. Next is a hearing test, and then a meeting with a GP. They will go through every single medical record from birth until present day so make sure you know what is on it. Even if you have a minor case of eczema as a baby, they will flag it up and you will be deferred. I was found to have a heart murmur as a baby, which even my parents had forgotten about, and was required to have an ultrasound scan on my heart there and then. Unfortunately for me, this meant removing my top and bra once again and being scanned by a male practitioner (chaperones can be requested). This took around 30 to 40 minutes in total. After an agonising wait, I was told it was all clear. Once you have passed, your number tag is changed for a sports bib with the same number. We lost 5 candidates during the medical due to various minor conditions - one girl failed a lung capacity test (a simple blow into a tube thing) and was immediately sent home. Another was sent home due to being celiac.

After a very long morning of head to toe MOT's, we were glad to see lunch time. The food was OK, and we all ate quite heavily. Little did we know that we would be running our 1.5 mile only an hour later (I was expecting it on Day 2, as it had been in every post I had read on here about the AC). We were gently jogged down to the parade square by a very friendly PTI and were walked around the parade square and car park to view our route. There was no hardcore 800m warm-up as I had read about and was dreading - we had only jogged in intervals of 20 seconds and then walked approx 200m to the parade square. During the run, many girls stopped and walked on several occasions. The staff at the start line shouted words of encouragement each time you passed them but could not see girls behind the cars who were having a quick rest break in between laps. They were not told that they had failed straightaway, as I understood from previous posts. After the run, we were given time to shower and watched another presentation on life in the army, and we could ask any pressing questions we had. Afterwards, we spent the evening having what felt like a girls only sleepover you have with your friends in Year 7 - we got on very well and had a good laugh too.

Day 2
Again, wake up was at around 5am. We had to strip our beds and fold the sheets precisely, and then put on our overalls, a hard hat and our numbered bib ready for the grenade throw and team tasks after breakfast. With the grenade throw, the best advice that can be given is attack the course with aggression - the Staff love a screamer. The team tasks were also enjoyable, and again, the best advice to give is to listen to the instructions given by Staff, be assertive if you think you have a workable plan, and help out your fellow team members. A Staff member will be writing notes on each of you throughout this, but it is easy to forget they are there. They may ask you individually what your chosen job role is and may ask you to brief the team on the plan before you go ahead with it. Make sure you have a Plan B. Enjoy the grenade throw and the team tasks as this is the part of the AC where you have a chance to have a little fun. After the team tasks were finished, we were given 30 minutes to shower and prepare for our final interview. We were taken into the presentation room, where we sat and waited for our numbers to be called by Staff entering the door in front of us. Some of the interviewers were civilian instructors, others were Officers. I was told I had achieved a mark of 70-something on my Army Cognitive Test, and had done very well in all other areas. The 'interview' didn't feel like too much of an interview despite having an Officer doing mine, and we had more of a discussion about what I already knew about my preferred job role, what I was expecting of army life, etc. (I'd recommend researching as much as possible to impress them, although I wasn't asked at all about my second job choice). I had unfortunately missed my required run time by 2 seconds, but was given an opportunity to attend a 4-week fitness course at Pirbright prior to Phase 1 training. There were only 2 fellow candidates out of 20 who had passed unconditionally and were awaiting a P1 start date. People were also not told whether they were A/B/C grade.

After our interviews we were given a packed lunch and taken back to the train station - we all went for a drink in a bar in the station and we all still keep in touch now via a group chat. I appreciate this is very long post but my experience was different to what I had read elsewhere and this may help someone out.
 
Hello everyone! I'm here to provide a detailed account of my experience at Glencorse Assessment Centre, as it was quite different from what I'd read on this thread and elsewhere online, and was different from what I expected. As my name suggests, I am female, hence why I believe my experience was different (?). Mainly, I found the staff to be much more relaxed and helpful than I expected, and this made our experience pretty enjoyable and put us at all ease.

Night 1
Anyway, I arrived at the train station ready to be picked up in the late evening. What threw me was the fact there were no other males in sight as we boarded the coach. The Staff introduced themselves and told us what would be happening over the next 2 and a half days. One of them explained that everything we do, how we conduct ourselves over the next few days, and how we act with our fellow candidates would be watched and assessed. He then announced the dreaded word 'Icebreaker' - however, this was only an informal chat with the person sat next to you on the coach who you'd already spoken to and got to know anyway. There would be no standing up and introducing yourself and your new best mate later on once we had arrived at the AC, as I had previously read. Apparently this was 'too scary' and created 'too much pressure' for new candidates. I then had to ask, 'where are the males?' - he explained that ever since a young candidate was caught in the toilets of the opposite sex doing something they shouldn't have with a fellow candidate, males and females are completely segregated in the AC (this was good news, as I couldn't have matched up to male candidates physically). We arrived at the AC and gathered in the main Reception area, where we picked up our urine pots and our number tag. We were taken to a computer room to log onto our portals (make sure you know your username and password - the Staff were undoubtedly annoyed at those who didn't know theirs) to check everything was in working order. We were then taken into a presentation room, talked through in more detail what would be happening, and given a clipboard, pencil and paperwork to fill in later on. We were then shown to our rooms - under 18's were in a separate room to over 18's, and again I was surprised at the age majority of under 18's. There were only 3 candidates out of 20 above the age of 21, with one being 30. On the beds were the duvets/covers/pillows etc. all laid out in a specific order, and folded in a specific way. Take note of this, as when it is time to change the bedsheets, they must be laid out in exactly the same way down in Reception. Once we had settled in, the Staff came in and told us what time we were to be down at Reception in the morning - I think this was 5:45am. He told us that they do not turn out the lights at 22:00, and that we were all adults and could choose when we wanted to go to sleep (was this a test? now I think about it maybe it was). We spent that evening filling in our paperwork and getting to know each other; you'll find that you get on immediately with everyone and that all of your worries are shared ones, although there is really nothing to worry about.

Day 1
Annoyingly, some girls set their alarms for 5am to give themselves enough time to straighten their hair (I'd recommend taking earplugs). The showers are also cold at that hour, but a cold shower does wonders for waking up the brain. We then went for a stroll down to the cookhouse, which was empty. A full English fry-up is served along with cereals and juice. After breakfast we were taken for our Medical - now, here is where it gets interesting. As I was a higher number candidate thanks to my alphabetically placed surname, I had to wait a VERY long time for my medical. So long in fact that I was taken along with 4 others to do the bag lift, jerry-can carry AND computer assessment all before 11am on Day 1. By the time I returned, some girls were still waiting for their medicals. I was called in first for an ECG - being a female, this can be rather awkward. I was not expecting this, but you are required to remove your top and bra whilst the practitioner does the assessment. Luckily it doesn't last longer than 10 minutes. Next is an eye test and colour perception test - if you wear glasses you are told to remove them at first and told to read the letter board. I am -2.75 in both eyes and couldn't see a thing, but I was told this was absolutely fine. Next is a hearing test, and then a meeting with a GP. They will go through every single medical record from birth until present day so make sure you know what is on it. Even if you have a minor case of eczema as a baby, they will flag it up and you will be deferred. I was found to have a heart murmur as a baby, which even my parents had forgotten about, and was required to have an ultrasound scan on my heart there and then. Unfortunately for me, this meant removing my top and bra once again and being scanned by a male practitioner (chaperones can be requested). This took around 30 to 40 minutes in total. After an agonising wait, I was told it was all clear. Once you have passed, your number tag is changed for a sports bib with the same number. We lost 5 candidates during the medical due to various minor conditions - one girl failed a lung capacity test (a simple blow into a tube thing) and was immediately sent home. Another was sent home due to being celiac.

After a very long morning of head to toe MOT's, we were glad to see lunch time. The food was OK, and we all ate quite heavily. Little did we know that we would be running our 1.5 mile only an hour later (I was expecting it on Day 2, as it had been in every post I had read on here about the AC). We were gently jogged down to the parade square by a very friendly PTI and were walked around the parade square and car park to view our route. There was no hardcore 800m warm-up as I had read about and was dreading - we had only jogged in intervals of 20 seconds and then walked approx 200m to the parade square. During the run, many girls stopped and walked on several occasions. The staff at the start line shouted words of encouragement each time you passed them but could not see girls behind the cars who were having a quick rest break in between laps. They were not told that they had failed straightaway, as I understood from previous posts. After the run, we were given time to shower and watched another presentation on life in the army, and we could ask any pressing questions we had. Afterwards, we spent the evening having what felt like a girls only sleepover you have with your friends in Year 7 - we got on very well and had a good laugh too.

Day 2
Again, wake up was at around 5am. We had to strip our beds and fold the sheets precisely, and then put on our overalls, a hard hat and our numbered bib ready for the grenade throw and team tasks after breakfast. With the grenade throw, the best advice that can be given is attack the course with aggression - the Staff love a screamer. The team tasks were also enjoyable, and again, the best advice to give is to listen to the instructions given by Staff, be assertive if you think you have a workable plan, and help out your fellow team members. A Staff member will be writing notes on each of you throughout this, but it is easy to forget they are there. They may ask you individually what your chosen job role is and may ask you to brief the team on the plan before you go ahead with it. Make sure you have a Plan B. Enjoy the grenade throw and the team tasks as this is the part of the AC where you have a chance to have a little fun. After the team tasks were finished, we were given 30 minutes to shower and prepare for our final interview. We were taken into the presentation room, where we sat and waited for our numbers to be called by Staff entering the door in front of us. Some of the interviewers were civilian instructors, others were Officers. I was told I had achieved a mark of 70-something on my Army Cognitive Test, and had done very well in all other areas. The 'interview' didn't feel like too much of an interview despite having an Officer doing mine, and we had more of a discussion about what I already knew about my preferred job role, what I was expecting of army life, etc. (I'd recommend researching as much as possible to impress them, although I wasn't asked at all about my second job choice). I had unfortunately missed my required run time by 2 seconds, but was given an opportunity to attend a 4-week fitness course at Pirbright prior to Phase 1 training. There were only 2 fellow candidates out of 20 who had passed unconditionally and were awaiting a P1 start date. People were also not told whether they were A/B/C grade.

After our interviews we were given a packed lunch and taken back to the train station - we all went for a drink in a bar in the station and we all still keep in touch now via a group chat. I appreciate this is very long post but my experience was different to what I had read elsewhere and this may help someone out.
Thank you so much for this post it's put my mind at ease for when I head up at the end of Jan. One question I do have is what did everyone turn up to the train station wearing? Numerous people have said rock up in a suit however my CSM said to not bother, just arrive in comfortable travelling clothes?
 

greengirlgee

Swinger
Thank you so much for this post it's put my mind at ease for when I head up at the end of Jan. One question I do have is what did everyone turn up to the train station wearing? Numerous people have said rock up in a suit however my CSM said to not bother, just arrive in comfortable travelling clothes?
You're welcome! I'm sure you will be totally fine - I realised I was worried over almost nothing! I was the only female who turned up in smart trousers, a nice blouse and a jacket. I just felt that was appropriate to turn up in. Everyone else was in tracksuits or jeans and I'll admit I felt a bit of a d*ck but at least it gave a good first impression.
 

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