ADHD and joining up

B

Bottleosmoke

Guest
#1
Sorry if this topic has been covered before but I am after a little advice.

My 16 year old nephew has ADHD and is to be honest a little sh1t, having been kicked out of all the schools / colleges he has been forced to attend.

He has shown interest in joining up and I for one think it is just what he needs. He is a very bright kid but just a general nightmare when it comes to education etc. However I think he will respond to Military discipline.

He is on the usual medication for this disorder.

Will his ADHD stop him from joining up? Im asking on here first as I dont want a wasted trip to ACIO and the inevitable battering to his confidence that rejection there would bring.

So any recruiters out there that can help me with this?

Cheers guys and girls.
 
#2
ADHD....that will be that wonder of medical science that allows litlle turds to go round smashing windows and acting in a general chav infested pikey way,then when asked to account for their yobo behaviour turn round and say "Its ADHD,sorry,im on medication"
Thats ok then son off you trot and carry on acting an arse.
Army...christ i hope not
 
#3
I reckon the routine more than the discipline could help. I was a right little nutter at school and got suspended numerous times and expelled once. Retrospectively, I probably was an ADHD kid. Every symptom fits, but the solid routine in training fitted me really well, as well as the very clear disciplinary mechanisms, and I sailed through. I'm now sitting right up at the top of the Sgts Mess food chain (no not head chef!), despite a perpetual battle with the old behavioural traits. My CR says it all - whirling dervish (yes, two different reporting officers from different units said the same, wierd huh?), hyperactive, energetic, dynamic. They never say logical, solid and methodical , cos it would be a lie! The key has been routine, as well as decent bosses and a strict wife :wink: to keep me on the straight and narrow.
 
#4
It is a medical in confidence thing that (when I was ) a Recruiting Sgt couldnt say No you cant enlist t the applicant. However after having quite a few applicants with the disorder all cases are dealt wit on an individual basis. The med sister told me that they have to be off the medication for at least one year (some time two) as a minimum and have no further treatment by the GP.
On the up side though I had a couple of lads who were originally deferred but after they had no further treatment or symptoms went onto do selection and one of them did extremely well and is now a fine soldier.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
PoisonDwarf said:
I reckon the routine more than the discipline could help. I was a right little nutter at school and got suspended numerous times and expelled once. Retrospectively, I probably was an ADHD kid. Every symptom fits, but the solid routine in training fitted me really well, as well as the very clear disciplinary mechanisms, and I sailed through. A perpetual battle with the old behavioural traits. My CR says it all - whirling dervish (yes, two different reporting officers from different units said the same, wierd huh?), hyperactive, energetic, dynamic. They never say logical, solid and methodical , cos it would be a lie! The key has been routine, as well as decent bosses and a strict wife :wink: to keep me on the straight and narrow.
Absolutely ditto. Total wnaker almost all the time, fighting, playing up, getting in trouble, way too much energy, getting expelled from schools (plural), but NEVER had any problems when serving. Get the lad off medication, he really doesn't need it and get him signed up. Civvy life won't be half as good for him. Army life will use that energy and redirect his thought processes to useful activity.
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#9
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

And if this is a wah I'll hunt you down and kill you.
 
B

Bottleosmoke

Guest
#10
Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder os something like that.

Basically its a medical get out for kids who are liitle sh1tes!
 
#11
PoisonDwarf said:
I reckon the routine more than the discipline could help. I was a right little nutter at school and got suspended numerous times and expelled once. Retrospectively, I probably was an ADHD kid. Every symptom fits, but the solid routine in training fitted me really well, as well as the very clear disciplinary mechanisms, and I sailed through. I'm now sitting right up at the top of the Sgts Mess food chain (no not head chef!), despite a perpetual battle with the old behavioural traits. My CR says it all - whirling dervish (yes, two different reporting officers from different units said the same, wierd huh?), hyperactive, energetic, dynamic. They never say logical, solid and methodical , cos it would be a lie! The key has been routine, as well as decent bosses and a strict wife :wink: to keep me on the straight and narrow.
Sh1t I think you've just written my CV
 
#12
ADHD doesn't exist. When i was a kid it was called bad behaviour.

Now they have a "condition" that needs "Treatment" and "Understanding" straight out of the nanny state top drawer.

Having come across a large amount of "sufferers" of ADHD i'm quite confident that most of them use it as an excuse for not knowing how to behave. I'm sure there are some who do have a genuine reason for their behaviour but i'm sure that 98% of cases are just plain and simply poorly behaved louts who have no comprehension of decent behaviour.

Does he have a criminal record as a result of his behaviour? (just out of curiosity)
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#13
Gosh. A copper and a Doctor? Do you get two salaries or is the policing a spare time thing?
 
#14
It's part of the new Home Office drive to get us to earn last years 3% rise. We've been doing social work for about 5 years now. It's only logical that we take over the medical profession, at least the mental side.
 
#15
Despite the understandable cynicism ADHD is all too real, unfortunately it has also opened the floodgates for every inadequate parent without the ability to control their kids an excuse which the medical profession seem all too willing to support. That said your nephew's problems could be significant. Ritilin is an amphetamine and needs to be progressively reduced whilst the lad continues to work on his coping strategies, the Army may then insist that he is clear of its use for between 1 - 2 years. The good news is that some of the more serious symptoms of ADHD: inability to concentrate for any period of time (10 mins is the normal max for sufferers) and little need for sleep (my son never slept for more than 4 hours between 7yrs and 16!) decrease post adolescence.

His biggest problems are likely to be sitting down and completing the entrance test and sitting through the interviews without looking like a demented flea on crack cocaine.

The good news is its possible, my son went from being just a boisterous kid at 7 to the Omen's child from hell at 11 and then on to get 11 GCSE's at grade A-C mostly A & B. No ritilin for nearly 3 years and he's a good kid more mature than many of his age, normal you might say, at least as normal as any 19 year old who doesn't need to sleep for more than about 4 or 5 hours a day.
 
#16
The_Seagull said:
ADHD doesn't exist. When i was a kid it was called bad behaviour.

Now they have a "condition" that needs "Treatment" and "Understanding" straight out of the nanny state top drawer.

Having come across a large amount of "sufferers" of ADHD i'm quite confident that most of them use it as an excuse for not knowing how to behave. I'm sure there are some who do have a genuine reason for their behaviour but i'm sure that 98% of cases are just plain and simply poorly behaved louts who have no comprehension of decent behaviour.

Does he have a criminal record as a result of his behaviour? (just out of curiosity)
Autism has gone from 1 in 1200 to about 1 in 166. This increase doesn't stem from convenience of labeling but of higher awareness and better ability to diagnose the issue,

Your assessment of ADHD is absolutely wrong. ADHD does indeed exist and its a valid issue.

Your ignorance on this issue only perpetuates a bias that has long existed.

How do I know this? I have ADHD. I've never been in jail, have 14 yrs in service, and 2 college degrees, and a very good paying job now. I've had my difficulties when I was younger but that was mainly due to a lack of knowledge on teachers parts.

It wasn't easy. I started in grade school in special ed classes because they didn't know at the time and I ran into morons like seagull who thought they knew what they were talking about, until I gave a report on how jet engines worked.

The military was great for me. ADHD lends itself to help people handle chaotic situations and of course with the distractions comes the opposite that a lot of people do not know about, hyperfocus.

Knowing you have it is half the battle, the rest is getting past the morons thinking your "just a little sh1t" . It's due to them that there becomes a true problem which is depression caused by people telling you you're no good all the time and with a situation you cannot help, lowers self esteem, causes depression and limits the persons ability to excell.

The military can be a great place for people with this challenge.
 
#17
chieftiff said:
Despite the understandable cynicism ADHD is all too real, unfortunately it has also opened the floodgates for every inadequate parent without the ability to control their kids an excuse which the medical profession seem all too willing to support. That said your nephew's problems could be significant. Ritilin is an amphetamine and needs to be progressively reduced whilst the lad continues to work on his coping strategies, the Army may then insist that he is clear of its use for between 1 - 2 years. The good news is that some of the more serious symptoms of ADHD: inability to concentrate for any period of time (10 mins is the normal max for sufferers) and little need for sleep (my son never slept for more than 4 hours between 7yrs and 16!) decrease post adolescence.

His biggest problems are likely to be sitting down and completing the entrance test and sitting through the interviews without looking like a demented flea on crack cocaine.

The good news is its possible, my son went from being just a boisterous kid at 7 to the Omen's child from hell at 11 and then on to get 11 GCSE's at grade A-C mostly A & B. No ritilin for nearly 3 years and he's a good kid more mature than many of his age, normal you might say, at least as normal as any 19 year old who doesn't need to sleep for more than about 4 or 5 hours a day.
My bold- Like i said 98% of "sufferers" are just plain bad behaved.

seems Like your boy is one of the real victims of it and it's good that he's gone on to do well. good on him, and undoubtably you as a supportive parent.

I might just be cynical because of the job and the fact that all the ADHD sufferers i've met are also criminals.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#18
Bottleosmoke said:
Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder os something like that.

Basically its a medical get out for kids who are liitle sh1tes!
I used to be one of them. Polis round the house twice weekly, expelled from school, sacked from the first job, heid-the-baw anything for a laugh, fighting, respect for bugger all, little c*nt. Joined up. Bugger all changed apart from the fact that they paid me. Marvellous organisation that it is.

I hope he gets in.
 
#19
I read this in our news paper tonight, an inside look at how some of those with differculties cope. Aspergers is quite common and is not always picked up, and can be misdiagnosed as ADHD.
_________________________________________________________
After a lifetime of seeing the world differently and not knowing why, ALYSON BRADLEY has been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. Now, she offers some insight into her life.
Asperger's syndrome? You may well ask. I did not think or even know about it until recently. I'm in my 40s and have just been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. I also found out I'm dyslexic.
Apparently, often people with Asperger's will have other learning difficulties. Dyslexia alone would be bad enough (but I think about 10 per cent of the population have it to some degree). Right now, though, I'm still trying to get my head around being an Aspies. All of a sudden, it's like not being who you thought you always were.
I have always been different but I never really knew why. Anyway, not so long ago I saw a TV programme about dyslexia and could relate to so much of it, I decided to find out more – which led to me being diagnosed as a dyslexic adult, who also has Asperger's.
I never really thought about or knew about it before. That's why I'm writing this – because I'd hate to think of anyone else having to be so misunderstood for as long as I have been.
I'm attempting to give you an insight into what it is like being me, and explain what Asperger's syndrome is – as I see it anyway. Then, maybe, if you have a child or know someone with this special gift, you will be able to understand them a little better.
Asperger's is known as high-functioning autism (HFA). One person in 100 has an autism spectrum disorder; this includes people who have Asperger's syndrome.
About 40,000 people have autism spectrum disorders in New Zealand. Everyone is affected differently, as we are all individuals. You really need to live with it to fully understand.
Whatever their general intelligence, everyone with the condition shares a difficulty in making sense of the world. However, IQ tests often show superior intelligence and high memory capacity.
Asperger's is found among all races, nationalities and social classes. It affects nine times as many boys as girls, and in case you're wondering, yes, I am a female, mother and wife.
Emotionally, at times, I just do not get it. I'm not even sure if I love and feel like you, and that hurts. Over the years, I think I've learned to act like everyone else. But things just do not always seem to really feel right. At times I can be quite emotionally detached, needing my space and the thought of being touched by anyone can be unbearable – even by my husband.
I can go through emotions robotically, but feel no warmth, just cold and distance. At times like this, my expressions of affection and grief are often short and weak. It's not that I have no feelings – I seem to push everyone away, but inside I am desperate to be hugged and loved.
I might not react to situations the same way as you. When I was younger I could at times totally over-react and be out of control. When I was quite young, my twin brother and I would be laughing when everyone else was crying or sad. But these days I do not react much at all. I just want everyone to go away, so that I can deal with things in my own way without being judged.
It can be so lonely at times – unable to discuss how I feel – because most of you just don't get it. I have tried to explain, but others seem to think I'm naive, living in a fantasy world.
So over the years I have tried to change, to make sense of things and be like you, even if it means deep sadness for me.
However, I do experience emotions, and, indeed, have a tremendous sense of humour – just one that you may find hard to relate to.
Music helps to blank out my muddled thoughts. No matter how bad I feel, if I go up my local hills alone, so it is just me and the world, it really helps to calm and refocus me and everything seems OK for a while.
But what really makes me happy, right now, is painting, which I pour my emotions into. Yes, I can truly say that when I'm painting and playing music, I'm very happy.
I also spend as much time as possible helping out at the local school, because the children are a real joy to be around.
I have always had problems with speech. As a child no-one could understand me. Now, especially if I'm meeting new people, my speech can become muddled and fast. I blurt out whatever first comes to mind. When I'm nervous I can be awkward and clumsy (hold on to your glassware).
I have no problems with heights, unless balance is involved – what's that? I have never ridden a bike. Forget interviews – my mind goes blank.
Noise also really affects me. My husband eats normally – you could say quietly – but to me it can seem really loud. Just odd little noises, even breathing, can at times affect me and I can feel myself becoming stressed and I just want to shout "stop" really loudly to release the emotional build-up.
I can be too honest and insensitive to the feelings of others. I'm not so good at keeping friends because when I have a low, I can offend and pester them far too much and not always say what I mean, being quite rude at times.
This can lead to paranoia, which is another big one. I often misread what people are saying or thinking. I tend to obsess on things until I'm 100% sure about them.
When I start something, I can get quite fixated by it and think about it all the time, using up all my energy, to the point where I become quite obsessive.
At times my mind seems to race, jumping from one thing to the next. It's like a nervous energy – words in my thoughts turn to chaos. That's when I want to withdraw. It's at times like these when conversations can get confused, when talking about one thing and I go off on another subject.
I can mix up words and conversations, and sometimes not quite make sense to others, only half saying things and wondering why they do not understand me.
I find it hard to listen to other people. Once I get the point, which is usually quickly, I will lose interest and want to talk about something else.
I find I become bored easily, so I try to always keep busy, otherwise my mind will race off in all directions. I feel like an actress playing the part at times, wanting to do and say one thing, and at the same time having to control my real self and thoughts – unlike when I was younger and could get away with crazy fun moments. I remember once just talking very fast all day long without hardly stopping, to the despair of my brothers.
Having continuous racing thoughts means I find it hard to sleep and as soon as I wake up, I have to do something.
I have to be totally organised to cope. I hate not being in routine – any change seems to elevate my stress to out-of-control levels – even if my husband says "let's just go out".
As I get older, certain things have changed and I can gain control to a point. When I was younger I could never look directly at anyone and socially found it hard. I was prone to egocentric behaviour – the person everyone remembers for the wrong reasons.
But however hard I try now, deep down, I know I'm different and always have to make that extra effort.
It's not all bad. Apparently I have strengths that most of you do not, such as the ability to process information automatically and quickly. My fluid reasoning gives me the ability to form concepts and solve problems using unfamiliar information or procedures.
I have a wonderful gift for being able to see the whole picture, but that can complicate things. For instance, if I'm told about a new procedure, I can usually find any error or possible changes it needs straight away. I have no concept of figures of authority – even if you're the prime minister, I will challenge and correct you, if I feel you are wrong.
All of this, at times, leads to exhaustion and I can get quite anxious. This is when I just want to withdraw into myself and release all the mixed-up hurt and pain, hide away and be safe. In fact a lot of the time I like being in my own space, not having to deal with other people's ways. I have found I often prefer being around children, older people and animals because they are not so judgmental.
Adults can be hard work. As hard as I try to please, I'm continually misunderstood for being me. It's like I have a hidden secret, which most of you will never fully be able to understand.
When first diagnosed, the worse thing was knowing that there is no fix, that I will never be like everyone else. But I now see it in a positive light. I have found out other members of my family have Asperger's; my children and theirs could also have the gift.
By writing this I'm not only trying to help you understand me, I'm also trying to understand myself.
The problem is having to pretend everything is OK, when my world feels like it's tumbling down in front of me and wondering who is the real me.
Knowing and being able to understand myself gives me so much more hope and courage. By having a better understanding of Asperger's and dyslexia, hopefully I can stop others from having to suffer for as long as I have had to, as I know only too well what a lonely existence you may be leading.
For now I can at least celebrate having a fast, complex brain, and start to feed it the right information, setting me and my family free to be ourselves.
The one thing that will never change is my special boys, Jack and Stuart, who truly are the best thing that ever happened to me.
I like my world – it's fun – and right now it is where I want to be. All I ask is that others try to accept me for who I am – a person who does not conform and fit into their world. Does anyone have the right to choose, or decide what or who is right in this world?
Being diagnosed is not easy, and anyone thinking of doing so, please get advice. If you suspect an autism spectrum disorder, a specialist diagnosis and assessment can be arranged through a GP, the Child Development Unit or a clinical psychologist.
There are also helpful websites: www.autismnz.org.nz, www.dyslexiafoundation.org.nz or www.speld.org.nz. I plan to set up my own website soon and can be emailed at nzalyson@yahoo.co.nz
 
#20
The_Seagull said:
chieftiff said:
Despite the understandable cynicism ADHD is all too real, unfortunately it has also opened the floodgates for every inadequate parent without the ability to control their kids an excuse which the medical profession seem all too willing to support. That said your nephew's problems could be significant. Ritilin is an amphetamine and needs to be progressively reduced whilst the lad continues to work on his coping strategies, the Army may then insist that he is clear of its use for between 1 - 2 years. The good news is that some of the more serious symptoms of ADHD: inability to concentrate for any period of time (10 mins is the normal max for sufferers) and little need for sleep (my son never slept for more than 4 hours between 7yrs and 16!) decrease post adolescence.

His biggest problems are likely to be sitting down and completing the entrance test and sitting through the interviews without looking like a demented flea on crack cocaine.

The good news is its possible, my son went from being just a boisterous kid at 7 to the Omen's child from hell at 11 and then on to get 11 GCSE's at grade A-C mostly A & B. No ritilin for nearly 3 years and he's a good kid more mature than many of his age, normal you might say, at least as normal as any 19 year old who doesn't need to sleep for more than about 4 or 5 hours a day.
My bold- Like i said 98% of "sufferers" are just plain bad behaved.

seems Like your boy is one of the real victims of it and it's good that he's gone on to do well. good on him, and undoubtably you as a supportive parent.

I might just be cynical because of the job and the fact that all the ADHD sufferers i've met are also criminals.
I agree with both these statements and whilst in the ACIO my eyes were opened up to this on a weekly basis. One of the problems for most of the kids who suffer from this is because its hiredatory and in a lot of cases i believe is used as an excuse because some parents dont give a damn about society and their kids progress. Its then an easy get rid of excuse by the GP/Social by diagnosing the problem as ADHD rather then looking deeper into the problem.

I saw both extremes of the cases though from people who said they had it just to sound big and hard to their parents and mates to some who really wanted to make a difference.

As said on an earlier post one of my greatest achievements whilst recruiting was getting a lad through his medical deferment of ADHD, nurtering him through a year of getting him to join ACF, Duke of Edinburgh and then turning him from a nobody to somebody who wanted to make something of his life. Before hand his split parents (total scum), carers, gp had all given up on him and had put him on medication( to basically shut him up).

He went on to pass pre-selection and selection with glowing reports from ADSC and special praise for the way he was always encouraging and talking to other. He then went on to get most improved student at his ATR ( ok best biff as we all call it-from zero to hero) but what an achievement for some one told two years previously he would make nothing of his life)

Hes now 18 and in his first Regiment and from what Ive been told fitting in well. Main thing to me is dont tar all the scum with the same brush, there are wasters out there who will live the same Chav life as there parents living on the dole or crime and are probably already applying for medication for there new borns and accusing them of suffering ADHD before they can walk. Hopefully those kids will be able to break the shackles and get a chance like this lad did.

Sorry climbing down from my soapbox.
 
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