"Address"? "Issues"? May we speak English?

#1
Does anyone else share my irritation at the incessant use of these curious terms - "Address" and "Issues" - when what's clearly intended is "tackle" or "deal with" and "problems" or "difficulties"?

This blandished and bastardised misuse of the English language is a symptom of Political Correctness, and ought not to be supported by clear-thinking soldiers.

Views and thoughts?
 

Fugly

LE
DirtyBAT
#2
address

• noun 1 the details of the place where someone lives or an organization is situated. 2 Computing a number identifying a location in a data storage system or computer memory. 3 a formal speech.

• verb 1 write someone’s name and address on (an envelope or parcel). 2 speak formally to. 3 think about and begin to deal with.

— DERIVATIVES addressee noun addresser noun.

— ORIGIN from Latin ad- ‘towards’ + directus ‘direct’.
issue

• noun 1 an important topic for debate or resolution. 2 the action of issuing. 3 each of a regular series of publications. 4 formal or Law children of one’s own.

• verb (issues, issued, issuing) 1 supply or distribute. 2 formally send out or make known: issue a statement. 3 (issue from) come, go, or flow out from.

— PHRASES at issue under discussion. make an issue of treat too seriously or as a problem. take issue with challenge.

— DERIVATIVES issuer noun.

— ORIGIN Old French, from Latin exire ‘go out’.
Oxford Dictionary Online

Try again. 1/10.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#3
This is almost as bad as being at Grans house, 3 generations of schoolteachers in the family made letterwriting a trial. I used to get my letters back marked in red ink.
I do still agree though, the internet and text speak are corrupting our language!
 

Fugly

LE
DirtyBAT
#4
Also:

caubeen said:
This blandished and bastardised misuse of the English language is a symptom of Political Correctness, and ought not to be supported by clear-thinking soldiers.
What the hell is that? If you are going to start a thread that criticises how a language is used, the very least you could do is not make up words that don't exist.

Half a mark docked.

0.5/10. See Me.
 
#6
Fugly said:
Also:

caubeen said:
This blandished and bastardised misuse of the English language is a symptom of Political Correctness, and ought not to be supported by clear-thinking soldiers.
What the hell is that? If you are going to start a thread that criticises how a language is used, they very least you could do is not make up words that don't exist.

Half a mark docked.

0.5/10. See Me.
Report for OFSTED inspection immediately.
 
#8
There are indeed some issues that need to be addressed here. To do this we need blue sky thinking, we need to think outside the box and not be put off by curve balls.

We should be all singing from the same hymn sheet, taking into account all the overarching and underpinning paradigms of our corporate message. Once an idea has been run up the flagpole let's see who salutes and then pluck all the low-hanging fruit we can.

Innit?
 
#9
When the vernacular becomes hackneyed the good get going ... or something like that.

Originality virtually expired with Oscar Wilde. The rest of us grab what crumbs we can from rich men's tables.

Etc. etc.
 
#10
Issue (verb and noun) means to come out of, come forth, appear, come to issue - - and that which comes forth, comes to issue.

Address (verb) means (primarily) to turn oneself, one's attention to.

An "issue" (noun) may or may not be a problem, worry or difficulty.

If we "address" or "address ourselves to" it, we tackle or deal with or consider it.

Traditionally, one only addresses one of three things - a letter, an audience/congregation, or a golf-ball. That is good usage. Otherwise we consider/tackle/deal with the "matter at issue".

Anythink else is post-'80s Orwellian Newspeak, typified by Blair.
 
#11
caubeen said:
Issue (verb and noun) means to come out of, come forth, appear, come to issue - - and that which comes forth, comes to issue.

Address (verb) means (primarily) to turn oneself, one's attention to.

An "issue" (noun) may or may not be a problem, worry or difficulty.

If we "address" or "address ourselves to" it, we tackle or deal with or consider it.

Traditionally, one only addresses one of three things - a letter, an audience/congregation, or a golf-ball. That is good usage. Otherwise we consider/tackle/deal with the "matter at issue".

Anythink else is post-'80s Orwellian Newspeak, typified by Blair.
You are putting "tradition" against the OED?
Interesting viewpoint, sir!
 
#12
radioactiveman said:
Fugly said:
Also:

caubeen said:
This blandished and bastardised misuse of the English language is a symptom of Political Correctness, and ought not to be supported by clear-thinking soldiers.
What the hell is that? If you are going to start a thread that criticises how a language is used, the[y] very least you could do is not make up words that don't exist.

Why not? If etymologically correct? That is how a living language evolves.

Half a mark docked.

0.5/10. See Me.
Report for OFSTED inspection immediately.
Bland. Blandness. Why not blandished - i.e. rendered/made bland? Just like everything the Blair generation has touched.

Except the clear-thinking armed services. Or elements thereof . . . . .

If a new adjective has just emerged, let it stand. It is etymologically impeccable.
 

Fugly

LE
DirtyBAT
#13
Traditional language over the Oxford English Dictionary? Back to Latin then. Unfortunately, mine is terrible.

Except for Romanes eunt domus.

Or should that be Romani ite domum?!!
 
#14
blue_sophist said:
caubeen said:
Issue (verb and noun) means to come out of, come forth, appear, come to issue - - and that which comes forth, comes to issue.

Address (verb) means (primarily) to turn oneself, one's attention to.

An "issue" (noun) may or may not be a problem, worry or difficulty.

If we "address" or "address ourselves to" it, we tackle or deal with or consider it.

Traditionally, one only addresses one of three things - a letter, an audience/congregation, or a golf-ball. That is good usage. Otherwise we consider/tackle/deal with the "matter at issue".

Anythink else is post-'80s Orwellian Newspeak, typified by Blair.
You are putting "tradition" against the OED?
Interesting viewpoint, sir!
The OED - new, Blair-ite version - is bollix. Have you seen the people they employ, FFS??

Etymology of ADDRESS : Middle English adressen, to direct, from Old French adresser, from Vulgar Latin *addrctire : Latin ad-, ad- + Vulgar Latin *drctire, to straighten (from Latin drctus , past participle of drigere, to direct

Ditto of ISSUE : Middle English, from Old French eissue, issue, from Vulgar Latin *exta, alteration of Latin exita, feminine past participle of exre, to go out : ex-, ex- + re, to go.

Case rested, M'Lud . . . . . . .
 
#15
jarrod248 said:
What winds me up is things going 'Pear-shaped' things being 'do-able'
and 'At the end of the day'
Who makes up these nonesense terms when we have perfectly good other real words.
"Pear-shaped" is a very vivid term I'd never encountered until I joined the army. :D

"Do-able" is bollix. :x Why not "possible; achievable"? :?

"At the end of the day" is merely an unsuccessful pause for breath, and for thoughts that have already gone pear-shaped - see above. 8) 8)
 
#16
ugly said:
This is almost as bad as being at Grans house, 3 generations of schoolteachers in the family made letterwriting a trial. I used to get my letters back marked in red ink.
I do still agree though, the internet and text speak are corrupting our language!
I knew there was a perfectly good reason why your posts/PMs are so impeccable as regards grammar, spelling etc.

Bloody good drills, those three generations! Cigars all round, Mulligan . . . . .

Take gallons of red ink with you to Oz, to teach them their Mother Tongue . . . . . "Like" and "Kylie" and that irritating terminal rising inflection - forsooth!!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#17
I do try only when I am p1ssed do I make a mess as a rule!
To be honest I am probably the black sheep of the family, I was known as the educated idiot, the monocled mutineer or that tw@t! I decided that joining as a buckshee was easier than studying, going to Sandhurst and Shrivenham. After all its not real soldiering is it?
 
#18
ugly said:
I do try only when I am p1ssed do I make a mess as a rule!
To be honest I am probably the black sheep of the family, I was known as the educated idiot, the monocled mutineer or that tw@t! I decided that joining as a buckshee was easier than studying, going to Sandhurst and Shrivenham. After all its not real soldiering is it?
The fact of the matter is you don't have to try. You know, because you was learned rite. So you were. Good on them!

"A little knowledge is easily carried!", as my late Pa was fond of observing.

And no - a "gentleman ranker" has always been the man with more flair, style and panache. And pinches all the officers' ladies . . . . .

Any joy buckwise/Sikh-wise? I have been thinging of yous . . . .
 
#19
... my pet hate is the unnecessary americanism and distortion of the english language, really gets my goat ... what does "upcoming" actually mean ? ... is it the opposite of "downgoing" ? - (a word i have fortunately not yet heard, but i suppose it wont be long ! ) ... does it relate to someone coming up a hill ? ... no one has yet been able to tell me, is there someone out there who can ? ... and please, don't anyone tell me it means coming, because if it does then why use upcoming ! ... takes longer to say, write and type ... sadly even national news readers have fallen into using this word, give me strength !! ... we have so much to thank america for, don't we !
 
#20
animal_farm said:
... my pet hate is the unnecessary americanism and distortion of the english language, really gets my goat ... what does "upcoming" actually mean ? ... is it the opposite of "downgoing" ? - (a word i have fortunately not yet heard, but i suppose it wont be long ! ) ... does it relate to someone coming up a hill ? ... no one has yet been able to tell me, is there someone out there who can ? ... and please, don't anyone tell me it means coming, because if it does then why use upcoming ! ... takes longer to say, write and type ... sadly even national news readers have fallen into using this word, give me strength !! ... we have so much to thank america for, don't we !
"Upcoming" is unnecessary, when "coming" or "rising" suffices. Your instincts are better than your use of capitalisation.

"At this point in time" is bollix, too. A point, geometrically, may only be in time - and space.

"Centres around" is equal bollix. Geometrically, the centre is the fixed, unmoving point, so things "revolve around" or "centre (up)on".

"In this day and age" is bollix, too. If in this day, it necessarily must be in this age.

And while we're at it, can we get rid of this ghastly "like"? Which is merely a verbalised version of "um" or "ah". And the grim "Kylies" who say same, with that nasty rising inflection at the end of every sentence. As if their every utterance was a kind of plea for reassurance? Like . . . . .

I shall think of some more, once I've dealt with this Bushmills. 8)
 

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