Actor Alec Baldwin fatally shoots woman on film set.

I do, hes an actor, it not his job to check weapons.
Years ago (and possibly still today) the army use to invite civvies to use the ranges, if a soldier had handed an rifle to a civvie and told him that it was safe, would it be the civvies fault if it wasnt?
One would have thought that after the Brandon Lee incident, actors using guns on movie sets would have been mandated to know what was the bangy bit, and how it worked.
 
One would have thought that after the Brandon Lee incident, actors using guns on movie sets would have been mandated to know what was the bangy bit, and how it worked.

28 years ago? In a country awash with guns, not likely.
 

DSJ

LE
I was that civvie...relied totally on the Royal Marine supervising me.

We had a safety brief at the start, but I was so excited and nervous it didn't stick. I relied totally on the bootie telling me the gun was safe when he handed it to me, and to make it safe when it stopped firing, normally because I'd emptied the mag, but not on one occasion.

It sounds like you were being supervised extremely closely to make sure you did not do anything unsafe exactly because you were not familiar with firearms.

It does not sound like any further checks were made (which apparently anyone on set is entitled to do, according to those in the know) from when the AD grabbed a pistol and handed it to Baldwin.
 
It sounds like you were being supervised extremely closely to make sure you did not do anything unsafe exactly because you were not familiar with firearms.

And because its wasnt his job to.
It wouldn't have mattered if he was great with weapons, it was the booties job to ensure it was safe, not his.
 
You might have been talking about the film industry in general which may well have good controls that are usually well and diligently operated but I was talking in the wider context, and in the very specific context of this incident it is hard to imagine that the outcome will be anything other than negligence.
I've been shooting in the US quite a bit when I'm working out there and I have to admit that all the ranges we have used have provided us with great support and supervision (they just don't let a couple of Brit yahoo's loose with automatic weaponry) and I have often seen regular shooters there policing each other.
The main problem in the US is those who don't do any training (almost all ranges run beginner courses) and inevitably end up in tragic circumstances.
And I get to play with a far larger array of weapony than the British Army ever let me play with.
'And for dessert would sir care for some belt fed?'.
 

dlrg

LE
From the last page of todays (27.10.2021) Bild-Zeitung. I've added the translation.

1635335193926.png
 
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I've been shooting in the US quite a bit when I'm working out there and I have to admit that all the ranges we have used have provided us with great support and supervision (they just don't let a couple of Brit yahoo's loose with automatic weaponry) and I have often seen regular shooters there policing each other.
The main problem in the US is those who don't do any training (almost all ranges run beginner courses) and inevitably end up in tragic circumstances.
And I get to play with a far larger array of weapony than the British Army ever let me play with.
'And for dessert would sir care for some belt fed?'.

I saw a great comment on here (Arrse not this thread) a while back to the effect that even though the citizens have the right to bear arms and a lot of people have one, it doesn't necessarily mean that they know what to do with them or can use them safely.
 
I've been shooting in the US quite a bit when I'm working out there and I have to admit that all the ranges we have used have provided us with great support and supervision (they just don't let a couple of Brit yahoo's loose with automatic weaponry) and I have often seen regular shooters there policing each other.
The main problem in the US is those who don't do any training (almost all ranges run beginner courses) and inevitably end up in tragic circumstances.
And I get to play with a far larger array of weapony than the British Army ever let me play with.
'And for dessert would sir care for some belt fed?'.

Indeed, and it is that demographic that I refer too. I wonder what the breakdown of those with access who have had training to those with access who have not had training, and assesment.

I also wonder if any casualness there bleeds over into the film industry, a place where maybe there is not a lot of take up in shooting and training.
 

DSJ

LE
Indeed, and it is that demographic that I refer too. I wonder what the breakdown of those with access who have had training to those with access who have not had training, and assesment.

I also wonder if any casualness there bleeds over into the film industry, a place where maybe there is not a lot of take up in shooting and training.

And/or possibly any actor who is vehemently anti 2nd Amendment is likely to look on weapons training as morally repugnant and "not important", thereby adding another layer of risk in the mix.
 
There's a lot being said about the precautions that are or should be taken in regard to functioning and non-functioning firearms but I've yet to see comment about privately held weapons.

I would imagine that if plinking is a common off duty pastime, some of the crew or extras may well be turning up with their own weapons. What precautions are taken with these? Everybody patted down when they enter or return to the filming location? Or are people merely told not to bring weapons in?

I appreciate that this is unlikely to have any relevance to this shooting but it must be difficult to take weapon safety seriously in a country where gun ownership is so profuse and restrictions so little*.


*at least, that's my understanding.
 
I do, hes an actor, it not his job to check weapons.
Years ago (and possibly still today) the army use to invite civvies to use the ranges, if a soldier had handed an rifle to a civvie and told him that it was safe, would it be the civvies fault if it wasnt?
Quick, anyone got a camera?
This is the first time I have been in complete agreement with @stacker1
 
I saw a great comment on here (Arrse not this thread) a while back to the effect that even though the citizens have the right to bear arms and a lot of people have one, it doesn't necessarily mean that they know what to do with them or can use them safely.

They have the right to bear arms, but they've got to chase the bear first

bear_arms.jpg
 

BaldBaBoon

War Hero
A chap who normally does some quite good videos on the twists and turns of various aspects of Hollywood giving his account with the latest released documents

 
I've been watching a number of YouTube interviews with attorneys and Hollywood safety professionals about this unfathomable debacle.

But here's a video from a former Green Beret. He clearly wasn't all that familiar with it (he thought Halyna Hutchins must have been an actress), but everything else he got exactly 100% right. It's worth watching.

 
One would have thought that after the Brandon Lee incident, actors using guns on movie sets would have been mandated to know what was the bangy bit, and how it worked.

Mandated or not, I don't believe "I didn't think the gun was loaded" was ever an acceptable excuse in a trial for negligent homicide. I don't see why it should be here either. Certainly the fact that someone else supposedly cleared it is a mitigating factor, I can't imagine jail time, but it's still responsibility.

Whether Baldwin likes guns or not, it's a tool of his trade, and there is an onus upon him to know what he's doing with the things.
 
My memory of New Mexico is a small supermarket. Shelves of ammo broken boxes and loose rounds spilled out. Stacks of fireworks leaking black powder and every third customer smoking.

CFB
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
There's a lot being said about the precautions that are or should be taken in regard to functioning and non-functioning firearms but I've yet to see comment about privately held weapons.

I would imagine that if plinking is a common off duty pastime, some of the crew or extras may well be turning up with their own weapons. What precautions are taken with these? Everybody patted down when they enter or return to the filming location? Or are people merely told not to bring weapons in?

I appreciate that this is unlikely to have any relevance to this shooting but it must be difficult to take weapon safety seriously in a country where gun ownership is so profuse and restrictions so little*.


*at least, that's my understanding.

Sorry but i cant be arsed to read all 34 pages but apparently what happened is that the armourer (some girl with no military or police experience in her early 20's) had allowed the revolver to be used by the crew for plinking with live rounds earlier that day. I dont understand why every new organisation keeps on calling it a "prop gun" when it's actually nothing of the sort.

Said revolver was not unloaded or cleared after plinking, went back on the trolley with the others, the AD (who has previous form for this sort of thing and will be the one taking the flack) handed it to Baldwin and declared it safe or "cold" in movie crew speak and then later on baldwin drew it, cocked it, pointed it at the lady who is now dead and pressed the trigger.

I'd like to see all three of them raked over the coals for this entirely avoidable death.

Incidentally, when i was a teenager in the acf I remember a lad had nicked some live rounds from the range and for some reason, on exercise later that week where we all had l85's with bfa's he took his bfa off, put a live round in the top of his mag and shot a tree. At the time nobody seemed that bothered, i wasn't really that bothered either but i supposed i had the benefit of seeing that the rest of the ammo in his mag were blanks but shit, that could have gone terribly wrong. Wonder how many other times that has happened over the years.
 
Sorry but i cant be arsed to read all 34 pages but apparently what happened is that the armourer (some girl with no military or police experience in her early 20's)

Woman not a girl.
It's America, half the country has firearms. Having military or police experience isnt such a big thing over there.
 

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