Achillies Tendon rehabilitation

#1
I recently got back from walking the North Norfolk coast, I was walking with about 60 pounds in my bergen and was wearing lowas. About 33 miles in (21 miles first day, 12ish into the next) my left heel started hurting like buggery. I loosened my boots which had been pretty tight as my feet were starting to suffer (no real tabbing style stuff done for about 8 months) and it helped a bit, but I still had to walk another 4 miles that day on shingle and then 10 the next day on it. Since getting home my ankle is painful, especially driving (clutch) and going downstairs. I can also feel a grating, as if my tendon is catching or almost ripping... it's a strange sensation.

Does anyone have any idea what I've done and how long it'll take to repair? Any strategies for getting it sorted sharpish as I'm hoping to walk dartmoor in just over a week?

Thanks in advance for any information received.
 
#2
Crabby:

Achilles Tendinitis

Description:
Pain in the lower calf along the Achilles tendon, the cord connecting the heel to the calf muscle. The injury is actually the swelling of the sheath within which the cord slides. When it becomes swollen, it creates too tight a fit for the tendon. Friction -- and pain -- are the results. To confirm that you have Achilles tendinitis, pinch the tendon starting close to the heel and working your way up toward the calf. If you feel some serious pain and maybe some swelling, you've got Achilles tendinitis.

Likely causes: Your tendon is being pulled, and because tendons don't much like to stretch, you feel a lot of pain. There are two reasons it might be getting stretched. First, your calf muscle might be too short. Second, your heel might be too far from the calf muscle.
Although that's from a running site, try the 'self-diagnosis' - squeeze and see if it hurts. If so, here's their advice:

Most important, though, you'll have to stop running for a few days. Give your tendon as much time as it needs for the pain to go away. If you continue to run through the injury, you risk tearing the tendon, and then you're looking at real pain. The time you should take off will range anywhere from a few days to two weeks. And don't stretch during this period, either. Your tendon has already been yanked around too much, and stretching, at least at first, will hurt more than help.
Basically, RICE: rest, ice-packs, compression, elevation, and wait until pain is gone. Not worth screwing around with your achilles: trying to 'tough it out' can lead to serious life-long problems. If that doesn't cure it, head to the docs...
 
#3
Yeah have been doing the self diagnosis thing, not only today but a few days ago - just out of interest. It does hurt.
I had been doing light stretching (to allow me to drive), but have stopped now. It is feeling better than it was.
To start with I could actually feel my tendon grating within the sheath, but can hardly feel that now - so assume it's getting better.
Thanks for the advice
 
#4
It would be worth getting a little triangle wedge, to place under your heel, to. It will reduce the pressure on you tendon.

Most sports shops will sell them.

edit* I think the grating (Spelling?) you feel, is an indication of tendonitus - so the wedge will help.
 
#5
It would be worth getting a little triangle wedge, to place under your heel, to. It will reduce the pressure on you tendon.
That is the normal 'cure' (both sons and wife use them). However, I'd be wary of 'self-doctoring' without seeing a physio, on that front. Son number 2 is quite a serious rugby player, and I was amazed to learn how interconnected the posture/orthotics/knee/hip/back pain thing is. Basically, if this was a once in a blue moon event, caused by over-doing it without adequate prep, it's probably fixable with rest, without wedges (orthotics). If that's so, adding an orthotic could actually damage you... Conversely, if it's a constant problem, they may well help: bottom line, any doubts, find a physio.
 
#6
Nibbler said:
It would be worth getting a little triangle wedge, to place under your heel, to. It will reduce the pressure on you tendon.
That is the normal 'cure' (both sons and wife use them). However, I'd be wary of 'self-doctoring' without seeing a physio, on that front. Son number 2 is quite a serious rugby player, and I was amazed to learn how interconnected the posture/orthotics/knee/hip/back pain thing is. Basically, if this was a once in a blue moon event, caused by over-doing it without adequate prep, it's probably fixable with rest, without wedges (orthotics). If that's so, adding an orthotic could actually damage you... Conversely, if it's a constant problem, they may well help: bottom line, any doubts, find a physio.
Obviously he should see a physio, but the advice I was offering him was how I was taught to deal with tendonitus on a Football Association sports injuries course I attended, that was run by the Army FA. So it does have a little credibility... but only a little!
 
#7
It is/was only a short-medium term injury, was just looking for a bit of advice on how to get it mended quicker. Therefore I won't be seeing a physio unless I start having longterm problems. I used to have ankle problems, have had knee problems and still have a back problem - so am quite up on how interlinked all these things are :p
How much more until I'm biff of the century?
 
#9
amazing__lobster said:
Jesus, you sound worse than me! Have you got flat feet by any chance?!
I do lack a bit of arch support according to the physio I had for my knees. The ankle problems I had was because my feet grew to quickly - size 13 by the time I was 12, took 6 years for the rest of me to catch up. Knee problems were lots of things, but sorted now. Back problems relates to my knackered shoulder which was an injury picked up on an assault course.

So do I win a prize? :D
 
#10
Obviously he should see a physio, but the advice I was offering him was how I was taught to deal with tendonitus on a Football Association sports injuries course I attended, that was run by the Army FA. So it does have a little credibility... but only a little!
No probs mate - I just didn't want the man damaging himself if it were not needed - if you know what I mean... Boy number 2 is just about to submit to a London Wasps trial, and I've become something of an expert - of necessity - on leg/back/shoulder injuries. Seems to me that the biggest problem is finding a good physio - made worse if you're serving, because of the constant moving. Good luck Crabby - you sound about as wrecked as me... :wink:

(edit - funnily enough, I'm completely flat footed, but because it's from birth, it's never bothered me...)
 
#11
lol, I have arthritus in both knee's after an assault course... bloody dangerous things!

Still, when I'm being pushed around in a wheelchair, I'm sure my War Pension will come in handy :cry: :cry: :cry:
 

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