Acf pft/cft?

#1
I was wondering if there is such a thing? And if so what the standards are? The reason I ask is that my son has decided that he wants to start getting fit for the Army (though he's got years until he can join), and would like to have some standards he can aim to beat. As he's only 11 I'm not sure that the regular PFT is suitable, but I thought perhaps there might be something in the ACF syllabus that he could use.

Thanks in advance for any input.

T_T
 
#5
I was wondering if there is such a thing? And if so what the standards are? The reason I ask is that my son has decided that he wants to start getting fit for the Army (though he's got years until he can join), and would like to have some standards he can aim to beat. As he's only 11 I'm not sure that the regular PFT is suitable, but I thought perhaps there might be something in the ACF syllabus that he could use.

Thanks in advance for any input.

T_T
The APC Syllabus does include a sport 'module', but there's no strict times or standards that have to be met.

We might well be doing it wrong, but at both detachments I've been at, we've done 'Sport' (can't call it PT apparently) once a month throughout their star progression, and kept the results of tests such as bleep test and upper body strength, and providing they show a progressive improvement as the months go on, they are awarded their star pass.

That said, I've never seen anyone failed on a star pass because of this. DCs like as many star passes as possible, so once the more 'compulsory' star passes are ticked off, I would be doubtful that any DC would hold on of theirs back from their next star because their fitness hadn't improved!
 
#6
I was wondering if there is such a thing? And if so what the standards are? The reason I ask is that my son has decided that he wants to start getting fit for the Army (though he's got years until he can join), and would like to have some standards he can aim to beat. As he's only 11 I'm not sure that the regular PFT is suitable, but I thought perhaps there might be something in the ACF syllabus that he could use.

Thanks in advance for any input.

T_T
The (ex-Regular) OC of my Para badged ACF detachment introduced an unofficial in-house BFTstyle evaluation for those wanting to train with 10 Para. We were given the opportunity of occasionally joining them on exercises but only after we had shown that we could hack it.

I understand that that this was quite unusual within the Hants and IOW.
 
#8
PAT tests. (Physical Achievement Tests) are part of the ACF syllabus at all star levels. Showing Improvement is the pass standard, not the improvement or achievement itself.
And how many cadets haven't clocked that the easiest way to achieve this is to struggle through a press up and then walk the bleep test / run on the first go, so that unless you completely mong the second attempt, you can't fail to improve? None.
 
#9
And how many cadets haven't clocked that the easiest way to achieve this is to struggle through a press up and then walk the bleep test / run on the first go, so that unless you completely mong the second attempt, you can't fail to improve? None.
That has got to be the most immature and unknowledgable post in the history of ARRSE.
Despite the last thirteen years of 'there are no losers, you all get medallions' of the labour party, kids will always strive to beat each other. To suggest otherwise, displays your your own unathletic skills, and a wish that you could have had the benefit of a cynical mind of a thirty odd year old, rather the a mind of an innocent young teen.
I put it to you, sir, you don't have the wishes of innocent kids, close to your heart.
 
#10
That has got to be the most immature and unknowledgable post in the history of ARRSE.
Despite the last thirteen years of 'there are no losers, you all get medallions' of the labour party, kids will always strive to beat each other. To suggest otherwise, displays your your own unathletic skills, and a wish that you could have had the benefit of a cynical mind of a thirty odd year old, rather the a mind of an innocent young teen.
I put it to you, sir, you don't have the wishes of innocent kids, close to your heart.
Never said that all of them put it into practice did I?

But what it does say is that the less-motivated lard-arse facebook-whores of the unit have no disadvantage over the hard working, self-training members of the unit, as the course is based on improvement and no set standards, and thus the easiest way to improve is to do badly to begin with.

So quit with the 'all AIs are fat **** paedos' thing and jog on. I didn't make any statement whatsoever about the actual attitudes or practices of the cadets, only the slightly 'bent' opportunity that such a system gives them.
 
#11
:thanks:
Never said that all of them put it into practice did I?

But what it does say is that the less-motivated lard-arse facebook-whores of the unit have no disadvantage over the hard working, self-training members of the unit, as the course is based on improvement and no set standards, and thus the easiest way to improve is to do badly to begin with.

So quit with the 'all AIs are fat **** paedos' thing and jog on. I didn't make any statement whatsoever about the actual attitudes or practices of the cadets, only the slightly 'bent' opportunity that such a system gives them.

Oh dear, sometimes the only reason I take my foot out of my mouth is to slap it on the keyboard and post a load of nonsence.
As a soon to be Dad again, at the grand old age of 45, I put it down to my paternal instincts where every child is a saint, and not a wind up merchant.[Nothing to do with a few glasses of apple juice]
Carry on regardless, and ignore the cheap sniping from the sidelines.:salut:
 
#12
Stick to running at a slow pace, but getting the miles in the legs. I would be very reluctent to introduce weight as his body is still growing, he could scupper any chance of joining if he damaged his body at this time of his life.
 
#13
Don't put weight on him AT ALL. Although he could do hill walking when he is a little older (DofE starts around 14) providing (IRRC) you keep the weight below 30% of his body weight.
 
#14
I wasn't planning on giving him any weight to run with. I wouldn't even recommend that if he was an adult.

I've taken him to a few 5k races, as he thinks that's more fun than just going for a run around the area where we live, and they've went okay for the most part. He's still struggling with concept of running at anything other than full speed, which means that he'll belt off into the distance then die after about 1k, but if I can keep him jogging slowly he can run the whole distance.
 
#15
There are standards, but they aren't obligatory; in fact it's just part of the D of E syllabus that's been written into the APC, so has to be open to all abilities. You can do any D of E approved physical activity, but do it properly with regular participation over a sustained period; a one off blast to count pressups 'n situps to put on a test sheet is missing the point.

Adults ought to participate on the same basis too, unless they have a note from their mum.

Tartan, if your sprog has an interest in the green stuff go chat up your local careers office or look online for pre recruit fitness programmes. You'll have to modify to suit, but it'll be good for quality if not quantity.
 
#16
T_T, if you like I am happy to ask one of the PE teachers what kind of distances and speeds they would encourage for a boy of 11 hoping to join the Army in due course. The school does regular runs for the pupils across the year groups and I'm sure that one of them would be happy to share what kind of standard they expect from the new-starting 11 year olds, and how that develops through their first year at the school.
 
#17
An interesting question Tartan_Terrier, and I am sorry not to have been around sooner!

I think the number one secret at that age is not so much the standard he can reach, but at age eleven the general enjoyment in doing stuff that happens to keep you fit, if that makes sense?

Worth mentioning also that any "standard age-eleven" sort of test would be flawed by the immense individual variance of children at that age due to a wide range of growth patterns. Thus if you found a "standard" he may find it silly-easy or carp-hard, simply because he differed from the average for the age (that is average not "norm" as much variation is "normal"), and meeting or not meeting that set standard would not be helpful in succeeding or seeing failure at the wrong moment.

My thinking is that, rather than become a dedicated runner, swimmer, footballer, athletics wizz etc, that the most important thing is to feed every interest he shows has in doing anything physical, (with you putting the safeguards in against anything too extreme). eg I would be very wary of weights!

My fear would be that if he chose one activity, and spent all his free time on it, apart from the risk in perhaps developing some muscle groups over others, I think more likely he might over five or seven years burn out with the interest, whereas if he is all-rounding as he finds things interesting to try, and learns thed kick of success, I would judge less chance of that?

The ACF physical activity tests mentioned earlier were not designed as a cop out for poorer physical specimens or under-average achievers, but sensibly thought through in their design to improve every cadet's situation; but also not to overstretch young people at different stages of development to a set pass/fail standard.

The principle would apply well in your thinking around your son, in that he and you can judge and measure his performance, and aim yourselves for that bit extra each time over periods of time; but by setting your own base level and standards, you can ensure he is stretched only sensibly over any given time within his limits, and gain achievement from where he improves, but never have a target that is too distant, and if he fails on any outing, it will not be by so far that he will not keep his enthusiasm to try again for that genuinely little extra.

Most outings will result in success, and if he gets a kick out of that, he is home and away.
 
#18
:thanks:


Oh dear, sometimes the only reason I take my foot out of my mouth is to slap it on the keyboard and post a load of nonsence.
As a soon to be Dad again, at the grand old age of 45, I put it down to my paternal instincts where every child is a saint, and not a wind up merchant.[Nothing to do with a few glasses of apple juice]
Carry on regardless, and ignore the cheap sniping from the sidelines.:salut:
You backtracking fanny, was it his harshly worded response that made you shit yourself or his breath that smells like teenage sperm ?
 
#19
Don't put weight on him AT ALL. Although he could do hill walking when he is a little older (DofE starts around 14) providing (IRRC) you keep the weight below 30% of his body weight.
Correct, you can commence Bronze at 14, Silver at 15 and Gold at 16. All participants have until they are 25 to complete as many of the awards as possible.
 
#20
Correct, you can commence Bronze at 14, Silver at 15 and Gold at 16. All participants have until they are 25 to complete as many of the awards as possible.
By the by: If any young person is joining the Army as a junior they almost certainly will not have time to complete Gold. If however they are joining as an adult, crack on and get Gold under your belt before joining. Very useful on the old CV for career prospects.