ACF banned from carrying weapons on Remembrance Day

#3
When i was a cadet, some years ago we used the cadet version of the SA80 (I forget it's specific designation...I'm sure a spotter will inform me soonest) for rifle drill occasionally, and I recall some of the senior cadets carrying them on remembrance parade.

Don't see an issue with it personally. I'd rather see gun handling taught to kids in a controlled environment. Far better than keeping them 'taboo', that just makes them more interesting to kids!

This country just has an endemic gun phobia. Need to get over it. They are just tools (both the guns and the guardian reading lefties...)
 
#4
None story

Weapons are never carried on remembrance out or respect so why would cadets carry them?


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#6
Wait out,
You my friend are 'big chief talking bollocks', weapons on formal parades are carried...LOOK at the parade in London for starters!!!
 
#7
On our local parade one cadet from each of the different organisations (ACF, ATC, Sea cadets and Marine cadets) stand as an honour guard around the memorial, they carry a Cadet GP rifle.

Other than that the only weapons I have ever seen on the parade have been officers swords and one bloke in a Foreign Legion outfit who carries a huge f-off hammer
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#9
Lets be fair, aren't there enough kids with guns on the streets ^^

Yes, that's my limo, thanks
 
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#10
Rifles are carried at the cenotaph in London.

When I was in cadets I only ever saw 4 senior cadets (usually one from each of ACF, ATC, Sea Cadets and Royal Marine Cadets) carry them as the Quarter Guard at the Cenotaph.
 
#11
None story

Weapons are never carried on remembrance out or respect so why would cadets carry them?


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Better tell all those Guardsman etc they're are being disrespectful at the Cenotaph.


Sent from my laptop using my fingers :)
 
#12
I have watched my daughter parade and lay the wreath on behave of the ACF on remembrance Sunday for the last 4 years, barring one and have never seen a cadet carrying any weapon.
 
#13
Wait out,
You my friend are 'big chief talking bollocks', weapons on formal parades are carried...LOOK at the parade in London for starters!!!
Well thanks for that grown up reply, a simple correction would have been appropriate instead of being down right rude.

Thinking about it I do recall the guards marching with weapons. However over the years I've never carried a rifle or a sword during a remembrance parade.






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#14
Better tell all those Guardsman etc they're are being disrespectful at the Cenotaph.


Sent from my laptop using my fingers :)
I never said that I only said they were not carried as I understood as a sign of respect.




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#18
When i was a cadet, some years ago we used the cadet version of the SA80 (I forget it's specific designation...I'm sure a spotter will inform me soonest) for rifle drill occasionally, and I recall some of the senior cadets carrying them on remembrance parade.
L98. A1 in your day I expect (big cocking handle extension?) now moved on to the A2 (as per SA80A2 except no change lever or full-auto function, otherwise exactly the same).
Don't see an issue with it personally. I'd rather see gun handling taught to kids in a controlled environment. Far better than keeping them 'taboo', that just makes them more interesting to kids!

This country just has an endemic gun phobia. Need to get over it. They are just tools (both the guns and the guardian reading lefties...)
Yep. Completely agree. In modern society you're not going to be able to completely shield kids from guns and knives. So I think it's better get them used to them in a responsible environment. Why is it that the Army Cadets carrying weapons is a 'glamorisation' but rappers in videos waving berettas about isn't?
 
#20
Exactly!!

And yes, L98 A1, that's the one. Bloody good fun, cocking it after every sodding shot!

Are the new cadet A2 rifles semi auto?
Yes they are. It's actually a bad thing in some ways, the A1s were slow enough to fire that the petty amount of ammunition the ACF are allowed per year actually lasted a decent amount of time. Now with semi auto weapons, cadets are burning off whole mags in quick time and running about way before they should. The idea behind the semi-auto was more range-based (this is the only role in which the ATC use the weapon, as it happens) as cadets had to lose their position every shot.

The A1 rifles I experienced as they were phased out were not good fun. Most had been cared for to a substandard and jammed most times they were cocked, as the rail to which the cocking handle extension was mounted got sticky and the cadets weren't strong enough to pull it back. You certainly could tell who'd been doing their pressups.

Anyway, back to the article...

It says

The paper said:
But Devon Cadet Executive Officer Major David Waterworth put an end to the tradition after he ruled that carrying weapons was 'not good for the image' of cadets, who can join between the ages of 12 and 18.
He said: 'There is no need for children to appear in public with weapons. It does upset some members of the public.
'There is no need for it. It doesn't reflect our aims and ethos in the Army Cadet Force. We are not soldiers.
'People say it's traditional at Remembrance parades, but there is no need to carry a weapon to remember the dead.
'I stopped it as soon as I heard they were doing it. It's not good for our image to have children carrying weapons in public.
'We are not members of the Armed Forces - we are a youth movement sponsored by the Ministry of Defence.'
He added that a ruling against children carrying rifles had been in place for ten years, but had not been enforced until now.
It was the CEOs choice it seems. Not PC gone mad. I think the point he's trying to make is 'the skills we teach stretch far beyond weapon use, and by parading with weapons we are representing ourselves as a weapon-based organisation, which we are not' - which is a fairly true statement to make. CEOs are employees of the RFCA and are very experienced in their job, I don't think that the CEO would have banned a historic and enjoyable practice unless he had good reason to.

Additionally, one must wonder whether security concerns were part of his decision. A youth organisation taking a number of (as explained above) fully working assault rifles minus the full-auto feature into the town centre might put both the security of the weapons, and the safety of the cadets, at risk?
 
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