Kit Reviews Accurate Armour 1:35 Fordson E83W Van (Mobile Canteen)

smeg-head

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#1
k072_1.jpg


Accurate Armour 1:35 Fordson E83W Van (Mobile Canteen)

The Fordson E83W, (also sold from 1952 under the Thames brand as Ford Thames E83W), is a 10 cwt (half ton) light commercial vehicle that was built by Ford of Britain at the Ford Dagenham assembly plant (home of Fordson tractors) between 1938 and 1957. The van was sold in Australia as the Ford Ten-Ten, and the E83W was available in various forms around much of the world as Britain strove to export after World War II. In some countries, the 'cowl and chassis' only was imported and local bodies built.

The E83W was aimed at the small haulage, trade and merchant market, sectors in which it sold well. An estate car variant was also available. During and after World War II, many specialist variations such as mobile canteens, ice cream vans and even fire pumps were built on the E83W chassis.

The E83W was powered by the 1,172 cc (71.5 cu in) Ford 10 hp side-valve engine, with a 3-speed gearbox, and was heavily geared down in the rear axle. This made the Fordson much slower than the saloons, with an effective top speed of not much over 40 mph. Apart from the 10 hp engine, the E83W shares few parts with the other small Fords, which does make spares a little harder to get hold of. The front and rear axles are much heavier than the saloon and 5cwt van components, and share some parts such as bearings and other internals with the contemporary Ford V8 models (Models 62 and E71A Pilot). The headlamps were shared with the E27N tractor, for which they were an optional extra only.

Accurate Armour design and manufacture scale military model kits for sale by mail order. Subjects include tanks, AFV's, trucks, submarines, artillery, fortifications, figures and ammunition. Accurate Armour also design and produce display models of military vehicles for the UK defence industry and military customers as special commissions.

This is a model I have wanting to build for a long while and was lucky enough to receive one as a Christmas present from the Leader of the Opposition. The kit itself comes in a box measuring about 10" x 5" x 5" with the standard Accurate Armour Logo on a photograph of the model. All parts inside are in small, bubble-wrapped baggies and then wrapped in more bubble-wrap. Instructions and decals come in another baggie in the box lid.

Moulded in light grey resin, the kit has about 90 parts. There aren't too many issues with the actual parts; one or two warped pieces, easily sorted in warm water; mould lines on most parts, but again, easily removed. There are no sink holes, so the filler doesn't need to come out yet. As usual with any resin kit, it is essential to wash all parts in warm detergent to remove any factory release grease.

The instructions are very well detailed, incorporating close up photos with line drawings and step by step commentaries. It is a good idea to read and understand all instructions before attempting to construct this kit. There is a very detailed interior included with this kit with additional kitchen equipment. Decals in the kit represent, YMCA, NAAFI and Salvation Army. Colour scheme is a light Khaki-Green with a white or cream interior.

All in all, this is a great kit which could form part of a larger diorama or as the centre of a small one. With the addition of a few tea drinking figures, this should look very life like.
Not a kit for the beginner, but definitely one to watch.
Rating: Excellent 5 out of 5

k072_4.jpg
 
#2
View attachment 353456

Accurate Armour 1:35 Fordson E83W Van (Mobile Canteen)

The Fordson E83W, (also sold from 1952 under the Thames brand as Ford Thames E83W), is a 10 cwt (half ton) light commercial vehicle that was built by Ford of Britain at the Ford Dagenham assembly plant (home of Fordson tractors) between 1938 and 1957. The van was sold in Australia as the Ford Ten-Ten, and the E83W was available in various forms around much of the world as Britain strove to export after World War II. In some countries, the 'cowl and chassis' only was imported and local bodies built.

The E83W was aimed at the small haulage, trade and merchant market, sectors in which it sold well. An estate car variant was also available. During and after World War II, many specialist variations such as mobile canteens, ice cream vans and even fire pumps were built on the E83W chassis.

The E83W was powered by the 1,172 cc (71.5 cu in) Ford 10 hp side-valve engine, with a 3-speed gearbox, and was heavily geared down in the rear axle. This made the Fordson much slower than the saloons, with an effective top speed of not much over 40 mph. Apart from the 10 hp engine, the E83W shares few parts with the other small Fords, which does make spares a little harder to get hold of. The front and rear axles are much heavier than the saloon and 5cwt van components, and share some parts such as bearings and other internals with the contemporary Ford V8 models (Models 62 and E71A Pilot). The headlamps were shared with the E27N tractor, for which they were an optional extra only.

Accurate Armour design and manufacture scale military model kits for sale by mail order. Subjects include tanks, AFV's, trucks, submarines, artillery, fortifications, figures and ammunition. Accurate Armour also design and produce display models of military vehicles for the UK defence industry and military customers as special commissions.

This is a model I have wanting to build for a long while and was lucky enough to receive one as a Christmas present from the Leader of the Opposition. The kit itself comes in a box measuring about 10" x 5" x 5" with the standard Accurate Armour Logo on a photograph of the model. All parts inside are in small, bubble-wrapped baggies and then wrapped in more bubble-wrap. Instructions and decals come in another baggie in the box lid.

Moulded in light grey resin, the kit has about 90 parts. There aren't too many issues with the actual parts; one or two warped pieces, easily sorted in warm water; mould lines on most parts, but again, easily removed. There are no sink holes, so the filler doesn't need to come out yet. As usual with any resin kit, it is essential to wash all parts in warm detergent to remove any factory release grease.

The instructions are very well detailed, incorporating close up photos with line drawings and step by step commentaries. It is a good idea to read and understand all instructions before attempting to construct this kit. There is a very detailed interior included with this kit with additional kitchen equipment. Decals in the kit represent, YMCA, NAAFI and Salvation Army. Colour scheme is a light Khaki-Green with a white or cream interior.

All in all, this is a great kit which could form part of a larger diorama or as the centre of a small one. With the addition of a few tea drinking figures, this should look very life like.
Not a kit for the beginner, but definitely one to watch.
Rating: Excellent 5 out of 5

View attachment 353457
That looks wonderful......erh, I don't suppose there's a German version available in blue by any chance??
 

smeg-head

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#3
Haven't seen or heard of anything. I'll have a hunt through my contacts to see what's available
 

smeg-head

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#4
Plenty of reference to the Gulasch-Kanone but only a couple of truck mounted canteen/kitchens.
1. Master's US Clubmobile conversion for deuce and a half
(Check out Scalelink's website)
2. IBJ Models EinheitsDiesel with small field kitchen Hf14.
Looking through t'interweb, there are no references to a German Mobile Canteen, so obviously it was just us Brits, Yanks and Cannucks that were degenerate enough to want food on the go.
1019720-13385-63-pristine.jpg

Picture_IBG_MOdels_IBG_35007.jpg

th (4).jpeg

th (5).jpeg
model einheitsdiesel.

s-l1000.jpg

Unknown German field kitchen
 
#5
Plenty of reference to the Gulasch-Kanone but only a couple of truck mounted canteen/kitchens.
1. Master's US Clubmobile conversion for deuce and a half
(Check out Scalelink's website)
2. IBJ Models EinheittsDiesel mit Gulasch-kanone.
Looking through t'interweb, there are no references to a German Mobile Canteen, so obviously it was just us Brits, Yanks and Cannucks that were degenerate enough to want food on the go.
It's late, have a rest.
 
#7
I was thinking more along the lines of Wolfgang's legendary brattie wagon :)
 
#8
View attachment 353456

Accurate Armour 1:35 Fordson E83W Van (Mobile Canteen)

The Fordson E83W, (also sold from 1952 under the Thames brand as Ford Thames E83W), is a 10 cwt (half ton) light commercial vehicle that was built by Ford of Britain at the Ford Dagenham assembly plant (home of Fordson tractors) between 1938 and 1957. The van was sold in Australia as the Ford Ten-Ten, and the E83W was available in various forms around much of the world as Britain strove to export after World War II. In some countries, the 'cowl and chassis' only was imported and local bodies built.

The E83W was aimed at the small haulage, trade and merchant market, sectors in which it sold well. An estate car variant was also available. During and after World War II, many specialist variations such as mobile canteens, ice cream vans and even fire pumps were built on the E83W chassis.

The E83W was powered by the 1,172 cc (71.5 cu in) Ford 10 hp side-valve engine, with a 3-speed gearbox, and was heavily geared down in the rear axle. This made the Fordson much slower than the saloons, with an effective top speed of not much over 40 mph. Apart from the 10 hp engine, the E83W shares few parts with the other small Fords, which does make spares a little harder to get hold of. The front and rear axles are much heavier than the saloon and 5cwt van components, and share some parts such as bearings and other internals with the contemporary Ford V8 models (Models 62 and E71A Pilot). The headlamps were shared with the E27N tractor, for which they were an optional extra only.

Accurate Armour design and manufacture scale military model kits for sale by mail order. Subjects include tanks, AFV's, trucks, submarines, artillery, fortifications, figures and ammunition. Accurate Armour also design and produce display models of military vehicles for the UK defence industry and military customers as special commissions.

This is a model I have wanting to build for a long while and was lucky enough to receive one as a Christmas present from the Leader of the Opposition. The kit itself comes in a box measuring about 10" x 5" x 5" with the standard Accurate Armour Logo on a photograph of the model. All parts inside are in small, bubble-wrapped baggies and then wrapped in more bubble-wrap. Instructions and decals come in another baggie in the box lid.

Moulded in light grey resin, the kit has about 90 parts. There aren't too many issues with the actual parts; one or two warped pieces, easily sorted in warm water; mould lines on most parts, but again, easily removed. There are no sink holes, so the filler doesn't need to come out yet. As usual with any resin kit, it is essential to wash all parts in warm detergent to remove any factory release grease.

The instructions are very well detailed, incorporating close up photos with line drawings and step by step commentaries. It is a good idea to read and understand all instructions before attempting to construct this kit. There is a very detailed interior included with this kit with additional kitchen equipment. Decals in the kit represent, YMCA, NAAFI and Salvation Army. Colour scheme is a light Khaki-Green with a white or cream interior.

All in all, this is a great kit which could form part of a larger diorama or as the centre of a small one. With the addition of a few tea drinking figures, this should look very life like.
Not a kit for the beginner, but definitely one to watch.
Rating: Excellent 5 out of 5

View attachment 353457
I shall have to save up and build a Red Shield (Salvation Army) version as I have been a Red Shield Officer, and drove the modern equivalent to Drawsko Pomorskie for Uhlan Eagle a few years ago.
 

smeg-head

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#9
Wolfgang’s Bratty Wagon


Wolfgang’s Bratty Wagon

When the British Army of the Rhine ran training exercises in the Soltau-Lüneburg Training Area throughout the ‘70s, ‘80s and into the early '90s, a familiar sight was a blue Mercedes van from which a man named Wolfgang would sell bratwursts, hot chips, burgers and cold beer.
Model designed by Evan Allen
It seems as though every British serviceman who went through training in Germany has a story about Wolfgang, ‘the Legend of Soltau’ and his food truck appearing like magic through the smoke of a mock battle, eliciting angry shouts from many an NCO as soldiers ran off to buy hot chips, bratwursts, burgers and cold beer.
Wolfgang had a semi-mythical ability to manoeuvre his van across seemingly impassible terrain to bring his wares to hungry armour crews (who were then often obliged to tow the van out when it got stuck). His knowledge of exercise plans and the local terrain was also legendary, and he often knew where units were headed before they even received their movement orders – some observed that if he wasn’t an East German spy, he should have been.
Methinks a dedicated thread to Herr Wolfgang should be forthcoming!
 
#11
Wolfgang’s Bratty Wagon


Wolfgang’s Bratty Wagon

When the British Army of the Rhine ran training exercises in the Soltau-Lüneburg Training Area throughout the ‘70s, ‘80s and into the early '90s, a familiar sight was a blue Mercedes van from which a man named Wolfgang would sell bratwursts, hot chips, burgers and cold beer.
Model designed by Evan Allen
It seems as though every British serviceman who went through training in Germany has a story about Wolfgang, ‘the Legend of Soltau’ and his food truck appearing like magic through the smoke of a mock battle, eliciting angry shouts from many an NCO as soldiers ran off to buy hot chips, bratwursts, burgers and cold beer.
Wolfgang had a semi-mythical ability to manoeuvre his van across seemingly impassible terrain to bring his wares to hungry armour crews (who were then often obliged to tow the van out when it got stuck). His knowledge of exercise plans and the local terrain was also legendary, and he often knew where units were headed before they even received their movement orders – some observed that if he wasn’t an East German spy, he should have been.
Methinks a dedicated thread to Herr Wolfgang should be forthcoming!
Mutant squaddies ??
 

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