Accident Management Companies and a No Fault Claim

#1
Bloke went into the back of me yesterday, no physical harm done but a nice 1.5ft long indentation across the bumper which the body shop has told me will cost north of £700 to fix given it's a new bumper jobbie with uncertain damage behind. Resigned to ringing up, they then passed over a leaflet for an "accident management company" which apparently do all the leg work while having the advantage of not affecting the old no claims and future premiums.

All seemed a bit to good to be true if I'm honest. Anyone had any dealings with these vs the standard claims route? From a cursory reading, it would appear there is the potential to get stung for courtesy car costs if the other party start acting up.

Any experiences chaps?
 
#2
Be wary about some of these firms. Some are good, some are sharks.
I would be tempted to call my own insurance firm and deal with it that way, they should assign you a claim manager who will do all that the company will do.
 
#3
Be wary about some of these firms. Some are good, some are sharks.
I would be tempted to call my own insurance firm and deal with it that way, they should assign you a claim manager who will do all that the company will do.
Yeah it all sounded a bit too good to be true. The carrot, of course, being allegedly no effect on premiums or excess etc. I find this dubious as insurers keep a database of all claims made, regardless of what company/broker it's under.

Online reading is like you said pretty much indicative of good experiences vs awful ones in a roughly 40/60 ratio.
 
Last edited:
#4
Go through your own insurance company. They'll still use their own 'accident management agents' but at least they're legit. Stand by for four or five years of unsolicited phone calls about making a claim for the injuries you suffered during the accident though. Exactly the same happened to me. No injuries, but endless calls over years, some demanding that I claim since the money has been put aside for me. Parasites.
 
#5
I have heard of people ending up being very out of pocket using some of the more dubious firms. They seem to be more interested in the "arrgh me neck" side of the claim.
 
#6
Son in law had similar a few days ago, He is with Hastings Insurance, who put him straight on to a claims company. I assume 'No fault' is important here (Householder gave him cctv of bump showing nowt he could do) - He got a car and his in repair within 24 hours, all seems up front and 'normal' as far as Insurance company is concerned
 
#8
Thank you chaps.
 
#9
I had my Lotus Exige spanked by a bus many moons ago & the dealer I got it from put me in touch with their recommended AMC who were fooking outstanding. For no fault claims, they can be brilliant but do some research as said.
 
#10
Bloke went into the back of me yesterday, no physical harm done but a nice 1.5ft long indentation across the bumper which the body shop has told me will cost north of £700 to fix given it's a new bumper jobbie with uncertain damage behind. Resigned to ringing up, they then passed over a leaflet for an "accident management company" which apparently do all the leg work while having the advantage of not affecting the old no claims and future premiums.

All seemed a bit to good to be true if I'm honest. Anyone had any dealings with these vs the standard claims route? From a cursory reading, it would appear there is the potential to get stung for courtesy car costs if the other party start acting up.

Any experiences chaps?
My bold. I have known a modern car written off for the other damage which wasn't clear until the carpets were lifted.
 
#11
Bloke went into the back of me yesterday, no physical harm done but a nice 1.5ft long indentation across the bumper which the body shop has told me will cost north of £700 to fix given it's a new bumper jobbie with uncertain damage behind. Resigned to ringing up, they then passed over a leaflet for an "accident management company" which apparently do all the leg work while having the advantage of not affecting the old no claims and future premiums.

All seemed a bit to good to be true if I'm honest. Anyone had any dealings with these vs the standard claims route? From a cursory reading, it would appear there is the potential to get stung for courtesy car costs if the other party start acting up.

Any experiences chaps?
It’s a shame but it’s an absolute certainty you’ll face a hike in your costs when it comes to renewal, even when an accident isn’t your fault they’ll sting you
 
#12
Bloke went into the back of me yesterday, no physical harm done but a nice 1.5ft long indentation across the bumper which the body shop has told me will cost north of £700 to fix given it's a new bumper jobbie with uncertain damage behind. Resigned to ringing up, they then passed over a leaflet for an "accident management company" which apparently do all the leg work while having the advantage of not affecting the old no claims and future premiums.

All seemed a bit to good to be true if I'm honest. Anyone had any dealings with these vs the standard claims route? From a cursory reading, it would appear there is the potential to get stung for courtesy car costs if the other party start acting up.

Any experiences chaps?
I had a no fault accident in a supermarket carpark a few years ago when some of git T boned me.

After contacting my insurance company I was directed to a local BMW dealership so they could the inspect the damage to my still driveable vehicle.

The damage assessor gave me the details of a management company whom I contacted immediately.

Within 2 hours I had a brand new BMW courtesy car delivered to my work place, my car was taken away for repair and it was delivered back to me 3 weeks later looking immaculate.

No dramas at all with going down the accident management company route, absolutely painless.
 
#13
Mrs was run into, SAGA insurance promoted their own management co, I was very dubious . Other party admitted liability, , in the end we used SAGA's company , although poorly managed , they sorted a hire car , I sorted the repairer as they had no recommended bookshop up here. car sorted.
A year after the accident , letter from the management co "just to advise " that the other partys insurance had not paid up and if required would I go to court ? a phone call followed say saying that this happens a lot and once court proceedings are initiated they get their money, they do the same practice. In any caser as I used SAGA's management co regardless of the outcome I would-not incur any further expense .
So despite my misgivings ,its turned out ok
so far
 
#14
Bloke went into the back of me yesterday, no physical harm done but a nice 1.5ft long indentation across the bumper which the body shop has told me will cost north of £700 to fix given it's a new bumper jobbie with uncertain damage behind. Resigned to ringing up, they then passed over a leaflet for an "accident management company" which apparently do all the leg work while having the advantage of not affecting the old no claims and future premiums.

All seemed a bit to good to be true if I'm honest. Anyone had any dealings with these vs the standard claims route? From a cursory reading, it would appear there is the potential to get stung for courtesy car costs if the other party start acting up.

Any experiences chaps?
Avoid them as you would a red-headed Welsh step-child, because:

Son in law had similar a few days ago, He is with Hastings Insurance, who put him straight on to a claims company. I assume 'No fault' is important here (Householder gave him cctv of bump showing nowt he could do) - He got a car and his in repair within 24 hours, all seems up front and 'normal' as far as Insurance company is concerned
. . . to my eternal shame, I worked as a site manager for one of these clown Accident Management Companies for not quite a year.

Your super-duper, all singing and dancing 'courtesy' car isn't-I strongly suspect that it will be a credit hire company who will dazzle your eyes whilst gently massaging your (symbolic) cock. The voice on the phone will promise you the earth (one tease being an upgraded model of your current wheels), give us the nod and oh! would you believe it, we have one in your area and only 40 minutes away, what do you say, sir? That's a 'yes'? Cool-now, if I could just have your debit/credit card details just in case the hire period is over 28 days, purely a formality, etc.

The nasty gang that I worked for had deals going with a few of the insurers in that they would get first dibs on loan car replacement. The start of the working day I had to ensure that pairs of drivers were positioned anywhere from Mid-Essex/Norff Lahndahn/and sometimes into Kent. Mostly the boys would be in a car each so that when one was delivered, they could be off and away to either wait for another call, collect one at the end of the hire period or back to the depot to collect another car.

. . . things got a bit strained at collection: the collecting driver would complete a Vehicle Condition Report (VCR) and watch as the hirers face fell lower and lower when every (and I mean EVERY) chip, tap, knock, puddle splash, etc was recorded. This is 10 years ago now, but the going rate was something like: paint chip=£10 which increased dependant on the size. Chip in the glass=£50: if it was in the 'A' line, double the price. Curb a steel wheel? 50 quid, please. And so on.


Don't fancy paying, sir? Well, you can dispute it-but we do have the card details and as soon as I press 'send' (all work done on a PDA), you bank balance will reflect our conversation.

Robbing, devious twats-hence why I left.
 
#15
Thanks all, appreciated.
 
#17
It’s a shame but it’s an absolute certainty you’ll face a hike in your costs when it comes to renewal, even when an accident isn’t your fault they’ll sting you
However, there is light at the end of the tunnel.

Insurance - claim for extra premium loading - case law

Start with Ironside v Eastern Gas Board (1964), which was approved in Patel v London Transport Executive (1981). And more recently Grahams v Brit Insurance (2011) - to recover an increase in premiums due to the loss of no claims bonus. But Baker v Courage (1989) removes this if there is any contributory negligence
 
#18
Avoid them as you would a red-headed Welsh step-child, because:



. . . to my eternal shame, I worked as a site manager for one of these clown Accident Management Companies for not quite a year.

Your super-duper, all singing and dancing 'courtesy' car isn't-I strongly suspect that it will be a credit hire company who will dazzle your eyes whilst gently massaging your (symbolic) cock. The voice on the phone will promise you the earth (one tease being an upgraded model of your current wheels), give us the nod and oh! would you believe it, we have one in your area and only 40 minutes away, what do you say, sir? That's a 'yes'? Cool-now, if I could just have your debit/credit card details just in case the hire period is over 28 days, purely a formality, etc.

The nasty gang that I worked for had deals going with a few of the insurers in that they would get first dibs on loan car replacement. The start of the working day I had to ensure that pairs of drivers were positioned anywhere from Mid-Essex/Norff Lahndahn/and sometimes into Kent. Mostly the boys would be in a car each so that when one was delivered, they could be off and away to either wait for another call, collect one at the end of the hire period or back to the depot to collect another car.

. . . things got a bit strained at collection: the collecting driver would complete a Vehicle Condition Report (VCR) and watch as the hirers face fell lower and lower when every (and I mean EVERY) chip, tap, knock, puddle splash, etc was recorded. This is 10 years ago now, but the going rate was something like: paint chip=£10 which increased dependant on the size. Chip in the glass=£50: if it was in the 'A' line, double the price. Curb a steel wheel? 50 quid, please. And so on.


Don't fancy paying, sir? Well, you can dispute it-but we do have the card details and as soon as I press 'send' (all work done on a PDA), you bank balance will reflect our conversation.

Robbing, devious twats-hence why I left.
Yes, when our hire car arrived Mrs WW to the dismay of the" Hassan" twins photographed it and pointed out every ding and scuff , when they came to collect it found it washed and polished and hoovered.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#19
Yes, when our hire car arrived Mrs WW to the dismay of the" Hassan" twins photographed it and pointed out every ding and scuff , when they came to collect it found it washed and polished and hoovered.
Yip.

As a rule of thumb, whenever I have to sign for a hire or temporary car, I tell the guy to wait there.

With sheet in hand, I mark out every single thing. Dink, ping, chip, scuff, etc.

Eventually the guy throws a huff, takes the sheet from me and puts a big circle around the car and writes 'too many marks to note'.

Bish. Bash. Bosh.

Plus videos and pictures. Saved me a fortune in Spain the dodgy cunts.
 
#20
However, there is light at the end of the tunnel.

Insurance - claim for extra premium loading - case law

Start with Ironside v Eastern Gas Board (1964), which was approved in Patel v London Transport Executive (1981). And more recently Grahams v Brit Insurance (2011) - to recover an increase in premiums due to the loss of no claims bonus. But Baker v Courage (1989) removes this if there is any contributory negligence
Even if your no claims bonus is protected your insurance company, or indeed any new insurance company will still hike your renewal cost, even if you aren’t at fault you will still be classed as more likely to make another claim
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top