Accident advice

#1
Apologies if I’m dropping this in the wrong thread*


Following an accident a couple of months ago which essentially-after surgery- is highly likely to leave me unable to grip/use my right thumb properly, I wonder if anyone is able to offer an educated prediction on whether I ought to be bracing myself for a worst case scenario MD or just a downgrade if it gets that far?

I know it’s not a life changing injury by any means, nor do I wish to make it out to be. Just wondering as the doc in our last appointment, reckons it’ll stop me using a rifle as well as doing other job specific stuff.

Thanks in advance.
 
#4
Back in the mid 70's a mate of mine suffered and injury which resulted in a much reduced ability to use his thumb and forefinger of his right hand(he is right handed). He was offered the choice of an MD or a permanent REMF job in a stores depot in the UK, he took the stores job but decided to leave in less than a year as it drove him nuts.
 
#5
Back in the mid 70's a mate of mine suffered and injury which resulted in a much reduced ability to use his thumb and forefinger of his right hand(he is right handed). He was offered the choice of an MD or a permanent REMF job in a stores depot in the UK, he took the stores job but decided to leave in less than a year as it drove him nuts.

Stacker?
 
#6
Apologies if I’m dropping this in the wrong thread*


Following an accident a couple of months ago which essentially-after surgery- is highly likely to leave me unable to grip/use my right thumb properly, I wonder if anyone is able to offer an educated prediction on whether I ought to be bracing myself for a worst case scenario MD or just a downgrade if it gets that far?

I know it’s not a life changing injury by any means, nor do I wish to make it out to be. Just wondering as the doc in our last appointment, reckons it’ll stop me using a rifle as well as doing other job specific stuff.

Thanks in advance.
You are more than welcome,Arrse is renowned for it's members sensible and sensitive advice in all of lifes little problems.
By the way you'd be useless as a tank gunner as well.:wave:
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
Apologies if I’m dropping this in the wrong thread*


Following an accident a couple of months ago which essentially-after surgery- is highly likely to leave me unable to grip/use my right thumb properly, I wonder if anyone is able to offer an educated prediction on whether I ought to be bracing myself for a worst case scenario MD or just a downgrade if it gets that far?

I know it’s not a life changing injury by any means, nor do I wish to make it out to be. Just wondering as the doc in our last appointment, reckons it’ll stop me using a rifle as well as doing other job specific stuff.

Thanks in advance.
You didn't describe the actual injury, but I suffered something similar at the end of 1989. It meant that my ability to pull in my left thumb to my index finger was severely degraded (I'm left-handed). I've no problem bringing my thumb up into the "OK" position, since the muscles responsible for that are in the forearm, it's just gripping things between finger and thumb I have trouble with. After a while, you learn to live with it and grip things with your index and middle fingers. Or if you have to, say, retrieve your credit-card from a machine, you can use the knuckles of the same fingers.

What I didn't notice was any inability to shoot, either with a pistol or with a rifle. The three fingers on your hand (not counting your index finger) have more than enough strength to hold a pistol-grip firmly and, if you try it out, you'll find that you don't actually need your thumb to do it, so I don't quite understand how your weapon-handling ability could be adversely affected.

MsG
 
#8
You didn't describe the actual injury, but I suffered something similar at the end of 1989. It meant that my ability to pull in my left thumb to my index finger was severely degraded (I'm left-handed). I've no problem bringing my thumb up into the "OK" position, since the muscles responsible for that are in the forearm, it's just gripping things between finger and thumb I have trouble with. After a while, you learn to live with it and grip things with your index and middle fingers. Or if you have to, say, retrieve your credit-card from a machine, you can use the knuckles of the same fingers.

What I didn't notice was any inability to shoot, either with a pistol or with a rifle. The three fingers on your hand (not counting your index finger) have more than enough strength to hold a pistol-grip firmly and, if you try it out, you'll find that you don't actually need your thumb to do it, so I don't quite understand how your weapon-handling ability could be adversely affected.

MsG
Cheers for your responses

It was a bad break in my right thumb (right handed), which needed some metal work and quite nicely shifted some of the nerves, so for now at lest I have no feeling on the pad.

I didn’t quite see either, how it would affect any weaponary stuff- except maybe a pistol, so Christ knows. :scratch:
 
#9
Cheers for your responses

It was a bad break in my right thumb (right handed), which needed some metal work and quite nicely shifted some of the nerves, so for now at lest I have no feeling on the pad.

I didn’t quite see either, how it would affect any weaponary stuff- except maybe a pistol, so Christ knows. :scratch:
Bugsys response is made up like most of his other posts.
 
#10
You didn't describe the actual injury, but I suffered something similar at the end of 1989. It meant that my ability to pull in my left thumb to my index finger was severely degraded (I'm left-handed). I've no problem bringing my thumb up into the "OK" position, since the muscles responsible for that are in the forearm, it's just gripping things between finger and thumb I have trouble with. After a while, you learn to live with it and grip things with your index and middle fingers. Or if you have to, say, retrieve your credit-card from a machine, you can use the knuckles of the same fingers.

What I didn't notice was any inability to shoot, either with a pistol or with a rifle. The three fingers on your hand (not counting your index finger) have more than enough strength to hold a pistol-grip firmly and, if you try it out, you'll find that you don't actually need your thumb to do it, so I don't quite understand how your weapon-handling ability could be adversely affected.

MsG
You tell more lies than an Asda watch.

MsG
 
#11
I do quite a bit of target shooting and the thumb of my trigger hand is parked out of the way. It plays no part in the grip at all and the club coach even reckons that if you position your thumb in opposition to your trigger finger, it often results in inaccuracy as you can't help squeezing from both sides.
 

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