About Those Un-Armored Humvees - bogus?

#1
Q On the 278th, can you repeat this? At the time the question was asked, the planted question, the unit had 784 of its 804 vehicles armored?

GEN. SPEAKES: Here is the overall solution that you see. And what we've had to do is -- the theater had to take care of 830 total vehicles. So this shows you the calculus that was used. Up north in Iraq, they drew 119 up-armored humvees from what we call stay-behind equipment. That is equipment from a force that was already up there. We went ahead and applied 38 add-on armor kits to piece of equipment they deployed over on a ship. They also had down in Kuwait 214 stay- behind equipment pieces that were add-on armor kits. And then over here they had 459 pieces of equipment that were given level-three protection. And so when you put all this together, that comes up with 830.

http://powerlineblog.com/archives/008949.php

msr
 
#2
msr said:
Q On the 278th, can you repeat this? At the time the question was asked, the planted question, the unit had 784 of its 804 vehicles armored?

GEN. SPEAKES: Here is the overall solution that you see. And what we've had to do is -- the theater had to take care of 830 total vehicles. So this shows you the calculus that was used. Up north in Iraq, they drew 119 up-armored humvees from what we call stay-behind equipment. That is equipment from a force that was already up there. We went ahead and applied 38 add-on armor kits to piece of equipment they deployed over on a ship. They also had down in Kuwait 214 stay- behind equipment pieces that were add-on armor kits. And then over here they had 459 pieces of equipment that were given level-three protection. And so when you put all this together, that comes up with 830.

http://powerlineblog.com/archives/008949.php

msr
In that case, something very interesting and significant is going on. According to Gen Speakes on that link, only 20 of the 830 vehicles had still to be uparmoured, they were completed within 24 hrs and were always going to be ready in 24.

Uparmouring is something commanders and G3 staff would have had a handle on: it's not merely a logistical/technical detail in a formation on its way to operations. Yet strangely neither of the senior officers flanking Secretary Rumsfeld moved a finger to help him when he was under pressure. Nor did anyone else in the hall - surely someone knew the figures? And remember the cheer which went up around the hall when the soldier asked that question?

Mr Rumsfeld can hardly be expected to have known the regiment's uparmouring status, but his responses to the "planted" question have left him weaker and attracting criticism from Republicans as well as Democrats. I suggest that the "hillbilly armor" plot against Rumsfeld goes a lot further than one soldier and one over-zealous embed reporter.
 
#4
hackle said:
I suggest that the "hillbilly armor" plot against Rumsfeld goes a lot further than one soldier and one over-zealous embed reporter.
Exactly. Another "unbiased" reporter without an agenda and acting on his own :roll: :lol:
 
#5
Rumsfeld's reply was disappointing but not surprising in its arrogance. In the very least no one could have faulted him for saying that he would look into it but no, he probably didn't even realise that his response was dismissive and arrogant.

Couple that with the breaking news today of the fact that he has not personally been signing condolence letter to the families of fallen soldiers, but using a machine instead and the public image of a Defence Secretary who cares not for the lives of soldiers is hardening.

Days to do Donald.
 
#6
Well said Birdie. That "arrogance" is one of the reasons I do not like Rumsfeld. There is however a fast acting and well organised movement against him.

Cheney was a better Secretary of Defense IMO.
 
#7
Specialist Wilson's account of what happened. http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000739870

Soldier Says He Asked Rumsfeld 'Armor' Question Without Aid of Embed

By E&P Staff

Published: December 19, 2004

NEW YORK In his first public account of last week’s controversy, Spc. Thomas Wilson says that he came up with the now famous “armor” question for Pentagon chief Donald Rumsfeld himself, without the help of oft-criticized reporter Edward Lee Pitts. And he adds, "If this is my 15 minutes of fame, I hope it saves a life."

The account appears in next week’s edition of Time magazine.

Wilson, who serves with Tennessee’s 278th Regiment in the National Guard, tells Time that he befriended Pitts, an embed for the Chattanooga Times Free Press, at California's Fort Irwin, where his unit trained. Later, in Kuwait, after Pitts learned that only soldiers could ask questions at the upcoming town hall meeting with Rumsfeld in Kuwait, he urged Wilson to come up with some "intelligent questions."

After his convoy arrived at Camp Arijan in Kuwait, Wilson found hundreds of fully armored vehicles promised to another unit months down the road. Wilson says he asked if the 278th could use them in the meantime, and was told no. That inspired his question about the shortage of armor, which he showed to Pitts.

The reporter, far from being the protagonist, suggested that he find “a less brash way of asking the question," but Wilson “told him no, that I wanted to make my point very clear."

Wilson says he also came up with three alternate questions on his own.

The Time account continues: “As for Rumsfeld's brusque response — that even a fully armored vehicle ‘can be blown up’--Wilson says, ‘Personally, I didn't like that answer.’”

But he added, “I hope I didn't do any damage to Secretary Rumsfeld.”

Following the meeting, Wilson told Rumsfeld he did not intend to put him “on the spot” or show disrespect, and the two shook hands. Most soldiers were “overwhelmingly positive” afterward, Wilson says, but one officer suggested he should have asked the question in a more “proper forum.”

Wilson says he replied: “What would the proper forum be?” He adds: “If it costs me my career to save another soldier, I'll give it."
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top