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Abandoned RAF Bases

The BBCs main photo shows some huge antenna dishes. They bases they were on , well small communications , well large communications links were all Army manned and part of the NATO ACE high communication link.

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The BBCs main photo shows some huge antenna dishes. They bases they were on , well small communications , well large communications links were all Army manned and part of the NATO ACE high communication link.

View attachment 499861

Which base?



 
Hasn't been on the RAF's inventory for a long time, and has goes the way of many ex-RAF bases once under the same 'new management'.

In 1977 the site was turned over to the British Army for use as a driving school, and was renamed Alamein Barracks, a satellite to Normandy Barracks of the Defence School of Transport at Leconfield.

Driffield had a brief return to the RAF in the 90s.

 
There was an Ace High station at RAF Saxa Vord, Unst, the northernmost of the Shetland Islands.

I think you 'll find that while it may have been administered from Saxa, the main site was Mossy Hill.
 
Which base?




From the photo could have been any in the UK

Not Germany or Cyprus though.

Maps a bit off, Coldblow was up the hills behind Maidstone? Had to stay on the Engineer camp in Maidstone.

Nowhere near London.

Mormond hill was outside Edinburg . Better posting as there was no accommodation . So all those serving got living out allowance for rent , nobody got a family member to buy a flat and have the Army to pay the mortgage for them :)
 
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Driffield's runways were laid with aggregate supplied by W. Clifford Watts, a local company. The aggregate they supplied was then removed by the same firm to go into the approach roads for the Humber Bridge. I had a summer job driving a Foden eight-leg tipper around the airfield between the excavator and the grader while waiting for my O-level results.
 
I think you 'll find that while it may have been administered from Saxa, the main site was Mossy Hill.
When I was at Saxa we had at least two army guys for Ace High, Unst is a bit of a trek to the mainland Shetland :)
 
I'm not ceertain but the mains system maybe down graded to US 110v rather than 240v.

That's correct. One of my previous bosses was part of a project team looking at taking back Woodbridge/Bentwaters as a prospective combined home for Harriers and Jaguars and closing Coltishall, Wittering, Laarbruch and a couple of other places. The stumbling block was the eye-watering cost of converting the electrical set-up from US to UK spec which far outweighed any other advantages of the move.
 
The big old hangers were still pock marked by ND's from US 8th. Air Force - it was said that the morgue building (in our day sports store) was haunted and that if one listened hard at night one could hear the engines being tested for the next big one over Germany.
Sure it was champ

because the Luftwaffe never attacked it in 1940, and the 4th Fighter group USAAF used to park their P-47's and 51's nose up so the guns would ND

it was never a 8th bomber base
 
View attachment 207511
RAF Tempsford.
Gibraltar Farm, the agents' final dispatch point. This barn contained several plaques and memorials to the SOE/SF agents, both men and women, who were flown from the airfield, many of whom were later killed after being captured and tortured. A memorial is also to be found in St Peter's Church, in the nearby village of Tempsford
They've just shown a film on Talking Pictures TV called " It can now be told " all about SOE and made in 1946 , so real locations and real kit .
I am pretty sure they used Tempsford itself as the departure location .
Well worth a watch .
 
Sure it was champ

because the Luftwaffe never attacked it in 1940, and the 4th Fighter group USAAF used to park their P-47's and 51's nose up so the guns would ND

it was never a 8th bomber base

<Cough>

'The airfield was attacked several times during the Battle of Britain. The first air-raid sounded on 18 June 1940, although the first bombs were not dropped on the airfield until seven days later. Then, on 2 August, came a heavy attack which destroyed several buildings, killing five, to be followed by another severe raid on 31 August. During August and September, Debden fighters claimed seventy aircraft destroyed, thirty probables and forty-one damaged.

'The airfield was transferred on 12 September 1942 to the United States Army Air Forces Eighth Air Force. Debden was assigned USAAF designation Station 356.

'With the transfer of the airfield and the entry of the United States into the war, Americans serving in the RAF Eagle squadronswere transferred into the American ranks, with 71, 121 and 133 RAF Eagle Squadrons becoming the 4th Fighter Group. The group was under the command of the 65th Fighter Wing of the VIII Fighter Command.'



'The VIII Fighter Command was a United States Army Air Forces unit of command above the Wings and below the numbered air force. Its primary mission was command and control of fighter operations within the Eighth Air Force.'

 
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UPS and FedEx go into Stansted every evening and come out again at about 2200. One to and from St Louis and the other to and from Memphis. Huge cargo aircraft but no idea what they are. They used to go in and out of the old RAF / USAF Alconbury base for a few years too...
There was a proposal to use Alconbury as a major hub, because of the rail and A1. Got trashed by the alternate proposal, housing.
 
<Cough>

'The airfield was attacked several times during the Battle of Britain. The first air-raid sounded on 18 June 1940, although the first bombs were not dropped on the airfield until seven days later. Then, on 2 August, came a heavy attack which destroyed several buildings, killing five, to be followed by another severe raid on 31 August. During August and September, Debden fighters claimed seventy aircraft destroyed, thirty probables and forty-one damaged.

'The airfield was transferred on 12 September 1942 to the United States Army Air Forces Eighth Air Force. Debden was assigned USAAF designation Station 356.

'With the transfer of the airfield and the entry of the United States into the war, Americans serving in the RAF Eagle squadronswere transferred into the American ranks, with 71, 121 and 133 RAF Eagle Squadrons becoming the 4th Fighter Group. The group was under the command of the 65th Fighter Wing of the VIII Fighter Command.'



'The VIII Fighter Command was a United States Army Air Forces unit of command above the Wings and below the numbered air force. Its primary mission was command and control of fighter operations within the Eighth Air Force.'

Cough cough

re read clausewitless
 
Cough cough

re read clausewitless

I'd suggest you re-read the 5 year old post that you replied to, brain's trust.

You stated that Debden was not attacked by the Luftwaffe in 1940 - that is incorrect.

'The airfield attack phase of the Battle of Britain had about two weeks to run, and casualties continued to rise. Five were killed and 13 wounded at Manston, Kent, on 24 August and four 257 Sqn ground crew killed at Debden, Essex, on 26 August. There would be only one casualty on 27 August. Following an air raid on Biggin Hill, 46 year old Sqn Ldr Eric Moxey took it upon himself to remove two unexploded bombs. Sadly, at 22:15, one of the bombs he was moving exploded, killing him instantly. His actions resulted in a posthumous award of the George Cross on 17 December 1940.

'The last two days of the month would see heavy casualties at RAF Biggin Hill, 30 killed and 13 wounded on 30 August, and Hornchurch and Debden where six were killed, with 12 wounded, on 31 August.'



You stated that Debden was not an 8th AF bomber base - the OP never stated that it was used by bombers, but that it was at 8th AF base, which is correct.
 
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I'd suggest you re-read the 5 year old post that you replied to, brain's trust.

You stated that Debden was not attacked by the Luftwaffe in 1940 - that is incorrect.

You stated that Debden was not an 8th AF bomber base - the OP never stated that it was used by bombers.
Sarcasm Schmuck and Debden was a FIGHTER base not Bomber bombers have the only machineguns which can fire upwards without pointing the entire aircraft the same way
 
Sarcasm Schmuck and Debden was a FIGHTER base not Bomber bombers have the only machineguns which can fire upwards without pointing the entire aircraft the same way

Put down the bottle; you're just making yourself look even more foolish than usual.
 
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