AAC Pilot Selection?

#1
Hey everyone, just enquiring as to if anyone has had experience with applying for AAC pilot selection from an infantry regiment. I'm currently Lcpl recommend for promotion and in the process of completing my paperwork. If anyone has any information on the aptitude tests and any other related information, it would be greatly recieved.
Kind regards
 
#2
Hey everyone, just enquiring as to if anyone has had experience with applying for AAC pilot selection from an infantry regiment. I'm currently Lcpl recommend for promotion and in the process of completing my paperwork. If anyone has any information on the aptitude tests and any other related information, it would be greatly recieved.
Kind regards
Hi
watch the six series of flying soldiers on you tube ,I watched it last week out of interest it seems to give a good insight to what would be in front of you.
it convinced me I wouldn't have passed:)
I stress I know NOTHING about the selection process but good luck to you.
 
#4
IIRC you'll need the gold-coloured cut-out wings from the side of the Microsoft aircraft simulator programme.

Seriously though, loads of luck in your aspirations.

tac
 
#5
I believe if your grandmother happens to be reigning queen, say of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, it helps quite a lot. I could be wrong of course.
 
#7
If your surname is Wales you'll walk it.
 
#8
I believe if your grandmother happens to be reigning queen, say of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, it helps quite a lot. I could be wrong of course.
You are wrong. He got ragged and passed on merit. Great if you like to read the Sun and believe the hype. He worked his tits off and isn't a natural pilot AND instead of coasting, he grafted. As well as doing the course, he continued to do his Royal duties too. I know I couldn't have passed with all the crap he had to put up with.

As an aside, I dont think I have much relevant info to pass on as I finished flying training over 20 years ago and the system is a different beast nowadays. Good luck all the same. You've either got it or you haven't.
 
#9
Wot Flash said. You can't be born to it. I know QHIs and Sup FACs who have instructed Prince Harry and they had nothing but praise for his hard work and attitude. Did you know that he was helping blokes on his FAC course who were struggling with their map interpretation? No? That's because you believe what you read in the papers. Having stood in the queue in a DFAC in BSN with him, I don't think there is any side to him at all. You can't do what he has done as an operator by accident of birth.


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cloudbuster

Guest
#10
Putting Harry's sterling efforts to one side for a moment, I would recommend that anyone applying keeps a papertrail (with supporting evidence of transmittal) as you go through the application process. For some odd reason, units have, in the past, shown a degree of reluctance to see a candidate progress to what must rank as one of the most challenging and rewarding jobs in the Army.

A copy of your FMED may also come in handy at a later date, too.
 
#11
Perhaps that's because those concerned are a little more ambitious than most, perhaps a bit brighter? Not someone a unit wants to lose?
That's why the RAF did away with Station Boards for airmen applying for commissions or airman aircrew a number of years ago. They go to an AFCO now for their interviews to take the unit's agenda out of the equation.

Cloudbuster, you are totally right.
The first thing teach you? Look after Number One.


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cloudbuster

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#12
Perhaps that's because those concerned are a little more ambitious than most, perhaps a bit brighter? Not someone a unit wants to lose?
Precisely my point, if a little clumsily-made. While I believe that the unit is not entitled to put in place any restrictions on a potential candidate, there is some anecdotal evidence that it has occurred in the past.
 
#13
I'm sure of it. I have had a couple of blokes ask me to sign off application forms for courses that have subsequently been knocked back from further up the food chain. I then had to quote chapter and verse to my elders and betters to show that it was not in their power to refuse the application on such shaky ground. "Because I say no" is rarely enough of a reason.


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#14
Couldn't agree more regarding the application process. I had to have a friendly clerk pull my application from the bottom of the Regt 2ic's bottom drawer and get the duty driver to take it directly to MW.

On my leaving interview he told me "if you fail the course, don't bother coming back". The application was viewed as 'turning your back on the Regimental family'.

As cloudbuster said, keep copies of all the paperwork you put forward ((so that you can complete another application quicker next time) and keep chasing it up all the way, don't take no for an answer. Try and get a famil visit to an AAC Regt, not a training unit, and you'll get the latest word directly from the horse's mouth and not from us granddads who did selection some 20+ years ago.

On a brighter note, very few people who pass selection fail the course and even those few who do fail seem to do very well for themselves back in their unit, or elsewhere.

Good luck!
 
#15
very few people who pass selection fail the course
Don't you believe it. 50% fail rate on my course. 6 in the fixed wing phase. Just because you're good enough to go on the course, doesn't mean you're good enough to pass it.
 
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cloudbuster

Guest
#16
Don't you believe it. 50% fail rate on my course. 6 in the fixed wing phase. Just because you're good enough to go on the course, doesn't mean you're good enough to pass it.
You forgot one important caveat, though; your APC was a very, very long time ago. Things may have moved-on in the selection process. :)
 
#17
#18
Make sure your hand eye co ordination is perfect other wise all your time and effort will be in vain.
Load of bollocks, this will improve as you progress through the course

Don't you believe it. 50% fail rate on my course. 6 in the fixed wing phase. Just because you're good enough to go on the course, doesn't mean you're good enough to pass it.
Yep, the failure rate when you went through was high but the selection process has improved since then - I'm not sure if I would have got through flying grading - I was a very slow starter!


Parapheonix, good luck with your selection
 
#19
As an aside, I dont think I have much relevant info to pass on as I finished flying training over 20 years ago and the system is a different beast nowadays. Good luck all the same. You've either got it or you haven't.
Coincidently, that was around about the same time that I was failing Flying Grading so I have very little of current relevance to add either. Other than I am so glad I fought through all the resistance to attempt it. I would be hate to be sat here now asking myself “What if” :)
 
#20
How much different is the course today than it was in the BBC series posted here?I can imagine faces, procedures and hardware has changed, but one still has to learn all the basics in a similar manner as shown on the series?Or not?It's a shame the series didn't go into the testing side to get onto the course in the first place.
 
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