A400M

Has the A400 taken the place of the Herc in FI yet. The A400 DT we’re making some pretty bold demands for infrastructure from DIO when I was there, then not following them up. It struck me as the usual DE&S business of moving and effective project manager onto something else after 10 minutes on task. It’s a bit like there approach to ensuring there’s enough toilets by closing them all and sending you to another building to find all the toilets full or being cleaned as the cleaners have to keep their quota up.
 
Low slung jet engines and rough field ops still worry me a tad however.
On a more serious note, I seem to remember that the Jaguar had no FOD problems on its trials on grass strips. Still some might say that the Adour was not that powerful, therefore no suction.
The Harrier on the othe hand operated in the field no problems, on exersize I saw dozens of take offs and landing from tin strips and pads, plus one exersize on German public roads. I seem to remember that the biggest problem from unprepared strips for the Harrier was the jet in front blowing up stuff because of the slightly lowered nozzles, and the rear jetsucking it up. Singletons obviously had no problem.
 
Has the A400 taken the place of the Herc in FI yet. The A400 DT we’re making some pretty bold demands for infrastructure from DIO when I was there, then not following them up. It struck me as the usual DE&S business of moving and effective project manager onto something else after 10 minutes on task. It’s a bit like there approach to ensuring there’s enough toilets by closing them all and sending you to another building to find all the toilets full or being cleaned as the cleaners have to keep their quota up.
Yes, it took over this month, I think.
 
On a more serious note, I seem to remember that the Jaguar had no FOD problems on its trials on grass strips. Still some might say that the Adour was not that powerful, therefore no suction.
The Harrier on the othe hand operated in the field no problems, on exersize I saw dozens of take offs and landing from tin strips and pads, plus one exersize on German public roads. I seem to remember that the biggest problem from unprepared strips for the Harrier was the jet in front blowing up stuff because of the slightly lowered nozzles, and the rear jetsucking it up. Singletons obviously had no problem.
Not quite sure about your last statement there, as the rear nozzles had high energy jet efflux coming out of them. The 'beauty' of the Pegasus design was that the big front fan was pretty robust and anything that went through it got thrown out through the front 'cold' nozzles rather than going rearwards to the more delicate parts of the engine.

ETA - RTFQ, orgASMic! I see what you mean - pairs of aircraft operating in close proximity, hence your point about singletons. Doh!!
 
I think it's a tad on the larger size for special ops. Could be wrong. The C130Js are probably still more suited to those kind of ops. I quite like the new C-130J-SOF.
A tricked out C27 can do wonders too. Quite a bit smaller and more "discreet", yet useful for getting the odd hooligan or four into garden sunspots.
That said, no good to us. Last thing we need is yet another aircraft type.
 
"However, in June of this year Jane’s reported that one of these C-130J-30s was recently abandoned in Iraq following HEAVY LANDING, leaving just 13 in the inventory".

How subtle . . . ;) !
 
"However, in June of this year Jane’s reported that one of these C-130J-30s was recently abandoned in Iraq following HEAVY LANDING, leaving just 13 in the inventory".

How subtle . . . ;) !
The C-130 crews do some very crunchy flying into some very challenging locations. Unfortunately, this time the 'crunchy' element was taken literally!

Regards,
MM
 
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