A400M Crashes in Spain (09/05/15)

#21
RIP to the crew that died.


But it's a turboprop. The Hercules is not a jet and neither is the Tucano, it's the big propellers on the outside of the jet engine that give it away.
 
#23
And yet if you work with them, they get called jets? And what's that... They have jet engines....
Its almost like as if helicopters arnt actually cabs and you'll be called a twat if you refer to voyager as a "the high bypass turbofan" instead of just "the jet".

:rolleyes: seriously. Can't actually believe I'm being picked up on common usage. Are you spotters or just twats?


Let's hope the investigation sorts it all out quickly. The Spanish seem to be a bit of a magnet for issues recently :sad:
Couple of mates work for Airbus in Engineering and refer to the A400 as a turboprop aircraft rather than calling the powerplant jets. However, other areas of the aviation industry might call such engines jets I suppose, I wouldn't know.

Just thought I'd throw it in there anyhow.

Be interesting to see what the accident's cause turns out to be.
 
#24
#26
That's a surprise as a turboprop doesn't even function like a jet with most of the power directed to drive the props. Sure you aren't confusing turboprop with turbojet? Not that it matters but it's good to get these things squared away. :cool:
 
#27
Probably just "plane" but that's kind of like the public calling anything with metal plates and tracks, tanks and anything that floats, boats.

That's a surprise as a turboprop doesn't even function like a jet with most of the power directed to drive the props. Sure you aren't confusing turboprop with turbojet? Not that it matters but it's good to get these things squared away
Yes I'm sure. Its a convenience, none spotty reference, not a 100% accurate description of the working of the whole thing. The main difference to most actual jets is its called a flight deck not a cockpit. But that's a size thing.

Again, reference "cabs". Call it a tandom rotor lift helicopter and all you will get is funny looks.
 
#29
Working on them? In the RAF?


Well yes they are. But if you actually work on them they are just jets. I've worked on hercs and have mates on the a400m. Whilst technically turboprop they are just referred to in everyday talk as "the jet". " go out to the jet" "did you hear about the jet that piled in?" "The jets fucked, can you go out and sort it out"
Must be a crab air thing, possibly as a quirk from the fast jet sqns, civil usually just referred to them by last 2 of the Reg in my experience Or all 4 if not a sequenced fleet ID) ie some stupid cleaner has left a light on and ZT has a flat, crews on board get it sorted so we can embark. Engine change required for ET, Lindermyer sort the Genny cables for the riggers.


Edit ah I see Im late to the party and its been done to deathed already.
 
#30
"Jet" is a crabair thing, it's one of their little foibles which makes us love them, like calling the Crew Room a "T" Bar and shooting their own osprey.

Makes my teeth itch, and I have even heard folk call their helicopters "Jets" sometimes.

I wouldn't call an A400 a jet, I'd call it an aircraft.
 
#32
According to different websites, the location of the A400M in Spain was not a popular idea with several nations participating in the program and this crash could lead to a more public voicing of their concern on the ability of Spain to host the final assembly line.

As for the results of the enquiry on this crash, some have already underlined that France is still waiting for the first results of the Spanish investigation on the Albacete crash of 28 January 2015. So far, nothing has been communicated.
 
#34
Well, it looks as if the reverso-cycle has been brought to full power once more!
;)
 
#35
The two survivors are a flight engineer and a mechanic; the three killed were the two pilots and another flight engineer. They all were spaniards.

According to the ABC spanish paper, the crew reported an incident w/o giving more explanation within one minute of take off; within three, it asked to land but w/o starting an emergency procedure. Then it reported it would not be able to land on the assigned runway. Then two minutes of radio silence. It then hit power cables bordering the airport and crashed.

http://sevilla.abc.es/sevilla/20150510/sevi-cronica-vuelo-a400m-201505092143.html

More info on the deceased, with pics:

http://sevilla.abc.es/sevilla/20150510/sevi-fallecidos-accidente-avion-201505100019.html
 
#36
If flight engineer survived, with a bit of luck he'll be able to shed light on it. RIP to the deceased and condolences to the rellies, an awful thing .
 
#37
RIP chaps.

Regards,
MM
 
#39
Insufficient power is tending to be the opinion. The flight recorders and survival of the Flight Engineer may well give some quick answers.

It is a new extremely computerised and complex flight system but then again it could be something as simple, though unlikely, as fuel contamination.

Should be some answers coming in soon.

Commiserations to all family and friends concerned.
 
#40
Cross-posted from PPRuNe:
German newspaper "Die Welt" reports three engines failed right after takeoff. Problems likely not related to engine hardware but to fuel control system.

(german language)

http://www.welt.de/wirtschaft/article140777948/Drei-von-vier-Triebwerken-des-A400M-ausgefallen.html
Insufficient power is tending to be the opinion. The flight recorders and survival of the Flight Engineer may well give some quick answers.

It is a new extremely computerised and complex flight system but then again it could be something as simple, though unlikely, as fuel contamination.

Should be some answers coming in soon.

Commiserations to all family and friends concerned.
A plane I worked on lost both engines on final approach due to flying into a massive flock of starlings (several 10.000 of them acc. to the captain, to whom I talked afterwards). The captain still managed to smash it onto the runway (instead of crashing it into a town behind), but he drove both main gears through the wings. Everybody walked away with light injuries. After the crash they counted more than 200 bird impacts on the fuselage and the wings, and both engines were clogged up with birds.
 

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