A Way out of Ganistan ? ?

#5
I think the whole 'Pashtunistan' thing would stand or fall on whether Pakistan bought into the idea. Given the blood and treasure they've spent in the Tribal Areas ensuring Pak integrity, I wonder how willing they'd be, especially if they couldn't guarantee a friendly state on their northern border.
 

Travelgall

MIA
Kit Reviewer
#6
Not a bad idea as a threat.
Might be worth using this as a motivational tool on the Pakistan Government - so they have to reign in the Pakistan SIS. Stop hiding and funding these nobs or we'll partition. Didn't go too well for them last time if history is anything to go by.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#7
I think the whole 'Pashtunistan' thing would stand or fall on whether Pakistan bought into the idea. Given the blood and treasure they've spent in the Tribal Areas ensuring Pak integrity, I wonder how willing they'd be, especially if they couldn't guarantee a friendly state on their northern border.
Not to mention India as well, the issue of Kashmir, and the percieved threat to Pakistani interests from India, are half the reason that Pakistan invest so much in irregular proxies, and have done since partition, when they first shipped Pathans into Kashmir before the Maharajah had time to decide which way he wanted to jump (if anything this action pushed him into the arms of India). If an agreement regarding Kashmir can be established and Pakistan can be assured that India is not a threat (wisdom of Solomon x9,000 to solve that one) it nullifies the main reason for the SIS to support such groups.
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#8
Totally agree with Rampant - the problem is not so much Afghanistan - it is, and always has been, Pakistan. They worth through proxies in their eternal power struggle with India. At least that's how they look at it. India probably couldn't give a flying cow about Pakistan.

Partitioning incidentally will not work - if Afghans are tribal/regional/local in outlook - which most are - the one thing that unites them is that they are Afghans, and if they hate each other, they hate furriners ten times more. There is a special section in the (old) Afghan Constitution which forbids exile from the Country - it was considered a punishment far worse than mere death, and therefore unconstitutional. They really do love their Country, but may not particularly like the people to the North/West/etc.

A bit like us and the sweaties, but with Afghans there are physical differences between many groups, unlike here, where fine upstanding Southerners are indistinguishable from feckless, ginger-haired, haggis-munchers.
 
#9
It's ISI for Inter Service Intelligence, not SIS. Ah, if it were that simple up in good ol' beautiful Pashtoo country... check out the locals nose, broken and then broken again... I am the well fed tourist btw... Do you really want to start this debate, this could be a loooong day/night...
 
#10
Oi mate, I am a sweaty, but I have brown hair, blue eyes and nary a freckle. In other words, I may look like one of your neighbours,
:cool:

Tam
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#11
It's ISI for Inter Service Intelligence, not SIS. Ah, if it were that simple up in good ol' beautiful Pashtoo country... check out the locals nose, broken and then broken again... I am the well fed tourist btw... Do you really want to start this debate, this could be a loooong day/night...
My bad, slip of the finger..... or am I getting my threads confused.

Second point - you're underestimating slightly there m'thinks.
 
#12
Well, for starters I would maintain that there is probably no one in ISB (Islamabad) these days that has control of the rouge cells that are loosely affiliated with the ISI, but in no formal chain of command. These outfits started a long time ago, they were most active between the seventies and the late 90's, when they were probably part of the overall strategy to de-stabilise the region when it suited the government. They were built up whenever Pak was under military rule and not to be touched during civilian rule. You would find them allover the region, within Pak and the disputed territories of Kashmir and and all over India and Afganistan, especially in the border region. It would also not surprise me to learn that the funding for these cells comes directly from sources in Saudi, hence again, making it difficult for Pak to control, influence or disrupt them.

I doubt whether General Kiyani has the capacity to influence their activities and I am certain that neither President Zardari or PM Gilani have any influence over what is going on in those cells.

Dont even get me started on the ethnic divisions of the Afghan, it is tough enough to deal with today, I dont dare imagine what it would be like if it was broken up in 3 or 4 bits...
 

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