A visit to an Israeli boneyard

The post I was stationed at for a while used a half track for the daytime patrol and for the nighttime QRF. Unlike on the M113, there was no internal intercom system or VRC helmets. I remember sitting by the nearside MG position seeing my mukker opposite me playing his harmonica and everything completely whited out by the wild, dry, scowling roar of the engine.
Do you still have them in storage?
 
I ask because I know you lads don't like to throw anything away. The M113's must be about forty years old by now.
"The U.S. Army planned to retire the M113 family of vehicles by 2018, seeking replacement with the GCV Infantry Fighting Vehicle program, but now replacement of the M113 has fallen to the Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AMPV) program. Thousands of M113s continue to see combat service in the Israel Defense Forces, although as of 2014 the IDF was seeking to gradually replace many of its 6,000 M113s, with Namer APCs."
(wikipedia)

There are non-operational halftracks at various IDF war memorials, which as such are still the property of IDF. Word has it that half tracks are also used as targets in training areas.
 
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The post I was stationed at for a while used a half track for the daytime patrol and for the nighttime QRF. Unlike on the M113, there was no internal intercom system or VRC helmets. I remember sitting by the nearside MG position seeing my mukker opposite me playing his harmonica and everything completely whited out by the wild, dry, scowling roar of the engine.
You were lucky. Could've been a banjo.
 
As it's a Whites no surprise the front axle is missing ..... the reason why the REME used only IH Halftracks ;-)
Really? Be interested to know what the issues were/are with the front axle as I've not heard that before. Information will be gratefully received!
 
For their time, they were pretty useful since they were relatively inexpensive, versatile and easy to maintain too - their steel-reinforced rubber tracks were far more economical than full steel tracks.
Their downside was generally poor protection and an insanely big turning circle for a tactical vehicle. Our IDF ones had powerful but noisy diesel engines.
IDF put Detroit diesels in them and the air cleaner was by the passengers feet so loads of induction noise from an already noisy engine......but as you say better than the Whites or Inter petrol engine it replaced in terms of power
 
IDF put Detroit diesels in them and the air cleaner was by the passengers feet so loads of induction noise from an already noisy engine......but as you say better than the Whites or Inter petrol engine it replaced in terms of power
My regular position was on the left hand 30 Browning (a little further back behind the driver). Apart from the whiteout noise effect while onboard, I particular remember the invasive howling sounds of the engine as the vehicle climbed the hills around our patrol base. We worked with Cents, M60's, Merkavas, Caterpillar dozers, M113's (which I also drove), but in a way, the engine sounds that I remember partticularly were those of the diesel halftracks, Rio trucks and Mack tank transporters. Oh and and an indeterminate quantity of T60's or 72's that suddenly started up in the middle of the night less than a klick from us.
The civvie Leyland Tiger buses regularly chartered to transport us around also had sweet throaty engine music.
 
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Really? Be interested to know what the issues were/are with the front axle as I've not heard that before. Information will be gratefully received!
THB was a bit of a tongue in cheek comment but.......

As you know Whites , Auto Car and Diamond T Halftracks all used the split type axles where as the Inters used a very heavy duty banjo type axle . Nothing wrong with the Whites type when you use it as a Halftrack they are as you know very reliable and strong . Look under an Inter next time and see the difference in axle and diff size

Problem came post war when the REME put a crane jib on the front bumper of winch equipped Halftracks and started to lift Meteor tank engines with the weight being taken some 4 ft in front of the front axle...... it's become obvious during the restoration of mine this was not a good thing as the jib was anchored to brackets welded to the side armour and so every heavy lift tried to bend the vehicle in half ......we've found stress cracks in the rear armour caused by this , again maybe they used Inters because the one piece armour was stronger being stressed in a way it was never envisaged to be as a normal Halftrack .

Even the stronger Inter axle was prone to splits and cracks due to the excessive strain placed on it .......mine was still in service late 60's early 70's so probably spent nearly 20 years being stressed in all the wrong directions in a way the designer could never have taken into account after having already spent 10 years as a normal M5A1 having been built December 43
 
IDF put Detroit diesels in them and the air cleaner was by the passengers feet so loads of induction noise from an already noisy engine......but as you say better than the Whites or Inter petrol engine it replaced in terms of power
I just clicked, when you mentioned Rio and Mack trucks....No wonder they were noisy Detroit two strokes!!! They were without doubt the most mechanically noisy engine ever designed...
 
I just clicked, when you mentioned Rio and Mack trucks....No wonder they were noisy Detroit two strokes!!! They were without doubt the most mechanically noisy engine ever designed...
But also sound flippin awsome .......

A friend had an M10 Achillies and the sound that made on full song was music.......we left Mons Town square with it one night and the sound of twin Detroits on full song echoing off the buildings fair made the hairs on the back of the neck stand up but a bit like the sound of a merlin in a Spit ideally you want to be close too but not in the vehicle .
 
AFAIK the only aircraft we actually captured were an Egyptian Mi8 in 67 or 73 and a Syrian Gazelle in 1982. There were also an Iraqi Mig 21 and later a Syrian Mig 23 that defected to us.
What would have become of the defectors ?
Large financial reward and resettlement where ?
 
What types of snakes in your part of the world ? Do they tend to lurk in places like this ?
 
What types of snakes in your part of the world ? Do they tend to lurk in places like this ?
the most common poisonous snake is the Palestinian Viper. I haven't see or heard of them in such places. Regular scrub or undergrowth is their thing, a friend of mine once encountered one face to face while up a tree pruning in the kibbutz apple orchards. Scorpions, black and yellow are also to be found but rarely in vehicles.
I suspect that for these types of fauna, armoured vehicles are too hot in summer and too cold in winter.
1280px-ArbeLevy-Vipera_palaestinae_4.jpg
 
I just clicked, when you mentioned Rio and Mack trucks....No wonder they were noisy Detroit two strokes!!! They were without doubt the most mechanically noisy engine ever designed...
Their was nothing to be heard on an Israeli highway quite like the sound of those Macks changing down as they slowed for a stop light / junction. Unique and unforgettable - I can hear the sound of them ringing in my grizzled head now, along with sounds like Purple Haze and Hey Joe.
 
Their was nothing to be heard on an Israeli highway quite like the sound of those Macks changing down as they slowed for a stop light / junction. Unique and unforgettable - I can hear the sound of them ringing in my grizzled head now, along with sounds like Purple Haze and Hey Joe.
First timeI came across Yank tank and I heard the air start, I nearly jumped out of my skin!
 
various IDF supplied vehicles pictured in service with the South Lebanon Army militia.

IDF upgraded T55 - war booty (the blokes are Israeli squaddies serving alongside SLA militia)
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something on a Sherman chassis....
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99158407_10157123062110009_735403649248788480_n.jpg
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