A visit to an Israeli boneyard

A kid who was out with his family enjoying the snow a few years ago lost a leg that way.
Going slightly off thread, around 1989 near Stanley Airfield I was with a group of people stood next to a marked minefield. Now because of the nature of the ground some of these mines migrate. Beyond the fence were sheep who were safe because they don't exert enough ground pressure to initiate the mine. So the theory.
Then there was a loud bang from around the corner. Faaaaaaaark! Who's trodden on a mine? Er we are safe here aren't we asked somebody. No panic, EOD had just disposed of a slack handfull of stuff that had been found, typically arty ammo and mines. Caused a few moments of mild concern though.

If you look at my avatar you'll see a fence in the background. It's mined, each mine around 100gms HE and shrapnel alined along the fence. Nice.
 
Going slightly off thread, around 1989 near Stanley Airfield I was with a group of people stood next to a marked minefield. Now because of the nature of the ground some of these mines migrate. Beyond the fence were sheep who were safe because they don't exert enough ground pressure to initiate the mine. So the theory.
Then there was a loud bang from around the corner. Faaaaaaaark! Who's trodden on a mine? Er we are safe here aren't we asked somebody. No panic, EOD had just disposed of a slack handfull of stuff that had been found, typically arty ammo and mines. Caused a few moments of mild concern though.
When I was stationed on the border with Lebanon in 1980 we would sometimes patrol the Lebanese side of the fence, particularly if something had gone bump in the night. On one occasion we found the remains of two goats that had wondered onto the strip that contained anti personnel mines. On another I remember that as we approached the suspect area, I was fascinated to see a little heart, just lying there on a rock. As we reached the mined strip, which was quite a few yards away, we saw the remains of a porcupine lying on it.
 
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Macron and Netanyahu's planes equipped with Elbit SkyShield defence against AA missiles:

Couldn't find an article in English yet.


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I've just seen this.

The last time I travelled somewhere dodgy with a PM was to Basrah. They didn't trust the Voyager A332 in Iraqi airspace so we flew to Jordan and piled onto a Herc. I assume it was because the defence kit on board the latter was better, rather than runway size.

Here's the Voyager at Jordan on the return leg:

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_62a.jpg
 
**SNIP**

If you look at my avatar you'll see a fence in the background. It's mined, each mine around 100gms HE and shrapnel alined along the fence. Nice.
Yup, the SM-70

dd_border_sm-70_0001.jpg

Apparently designed in occupied Czechoslovakia for the SS in order to improve concentration camp security. The Soviets captured the blueprints and passed them to the DDR in the 50s. The SM-70 then went into series production in the VEB Sprengstoffwerk Schönebeck an der Elbe in 1969.

The cone is filled with TNT and paraffin which has 92 splinters embedded in it. When activated, these are spat out to a range of 50m. The devices are mounted 30m apart.
 
Yup, the SM-70

View attachment 476872
Apparently designed in occupied Czechoslovakia for the SS in order to improve concentration camp security. The Soviets captured the blueprints and passed them to the DDR in the 50s. The SM-70 then went into series production in the VEB Sprengstoffwerk Schönebeck an der Elbe in 1969.

The cone is filled with TNT and paraffin which has 92 splinters embedded in it. When activated, these are spat out to a range of 50m. The devices are mounted 30m apart.
Thanks for that. Sometime in the 70s(?) some clown climbed over the fence from the West and removed an SM-70 and showed it to his mates in a bar. The GCP got to hear about it and said clown was "visited" by the GCP who were rather interested in his souvenir, as up till then nobody in the West really knew much about it. Apparently he got off with a severe warning. Meanwhile in the East the Grenztruppe had thrown a wobbly, but they eventually got their mine back.
Incidentally the VEB Sprengstoffwerk Schönebeck an der Elbe is still in business, but now as a private company.
 
What is or was the attraction with halftracks? They seem to be neither fish nor fowl, yet loads of armies had them at one time.
 
What is or was the attraction with halftracks? They seem to be neither fish nor fowl, yet loads of armies had them at one time.
The original M2 was a bit of an orphan's bastard (as I was brutally informed at great length by an over-weight re-enactor who was blessed with both an encyclopedic knowledge of the beast and nuclear grade halitosis) in that it was the mating of the forward half of the M3 (?) scout car and an existing half-track, the T9.

It was, by all accounts, a bit of a dog's breakfast until they uprated the power pack.
 
The original M2 was a bit of an orphan's bastard (as I was brutally informed at great length by an over-weight re-enactor who was blessed with both an encyclopedic knowledge of the beast and nuclear grade halitosis) in that it was the mating of the forward half of the M3 (?) scout car and an existing half-track, the T9.

It was, by all accounts, a bit of a dog's breakfast until they uprated the power pack.
Thanks.
 
What is or was the attraction with halftracks? They seem to be neither fish nor fowl, yet loads of armies had them at one time.
For their time, they were pretty useful since they were relatively inexpensive, versatile and easy to maintain too - their steel-reinforced rubber tracks were far more economical than full steel tracks.
Their downside was generally poor protection and an insanely big turning circle for a tactical vehicle. Our IDF ones had powerful but noisy diesel engines.
 
For their time, they were pretty useful since they were relatively inexpensive, versatile and easy to maintain too - their steel-reinforced rubber tracks were far more economical than full steel tracks.
Their downside was generally poor protection and an insanely big turning circle for a tactical vehicle. Our IDF ones had powerful but noisy diesel engines.
תודה
In those days power and noise went hand in hand.
 
תודה
In those days power and noise went hand in hand.
The post I was stationed at for a while used a half track for the daytime patrol and for the nighttime QRF. Unlike on the M113, there was no internal intercom system or VRC helmets. I remember sitting by the nearside MG position seeing my mukker opposite me playing his harmonica and everything completely whited out by the wild, dry, scowling roar of the engine.
 
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