A visit to an Israeli boneyard

Nice pics and a geeky question. I notice on most pictures there's a short Hebrew script on the lower left or lower right, appears to be the same on all the pictures, so what is it please?
It's the name of the guy who uploaded the pics to the forum, Jonathan Thal.
 
Before you ask, it's a nice sunny afternoon and nowhere to go thanks to Corona and very dry woods which are now verboten. Arrse to the rescue.
You may have come across this first pic - it's all over the web.
On an Israeli forum someone asked about it and a couple of people who were involved responded.
The Merk belonged to 126 Batt. 211 Bde. The accident occurred in 1987 during night movement with poor visibility in the Mishur Adumim area (a training area in the Judean desert). The gunner sensed what was happening and had the presence of mind to elevate the main armament, which saved the tank from ending up upside down. The gunner sustained a non serious injury to his eye socket and the rest of the crew sustained only bruises.
The tank was pulled up and out by an M88 vehicle and driven back to base under its own power. it was returned to service after repairs.


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You may have come across this first pic - it's all over the web.
On an Israeli forum someone asked about it and a couple of people who were involved responded.
The Merk belonged to 126 Batt. 211 Bde. The accident occurred in 1987 during night movement with poor visibility in the Mishur Adumim area (a training area in the Judean desert). The gunner sensed what was happening and had the presence of mind to elevate the main armament, which saved the tank from ending up upside down. The gunner sustained a non serious injury to his eye socket and the rest of the crew sustained only bruises.
The tank was pulled up and out by an M88 vehicle and driven back to base under its own power. it was returned to service after repairs.


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Have seen it somewhere before. Nice to see that the IDF has re-invented the Krummlauf.
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I'm surprised there isn't a fully erect piston sticking out the tube.
 
I'm surprised there isn't a fully erect piston sticking out the tube.
...with a little bit snipped off the end of course. It is Israel remember...
 
Bloke I know cut one down to pistol size for Nick Cage for some gun runner movie. I fired it a few times and it had an impressive muzzle blast, particuarly at night. Apparently Cage loved the thing.

The piston bit was cut off and filed down, pretty much at the attachment to the carrier and a fair bit of the muzzle blast came out of the ejection port. Not good for the eyebrows or your night vision.
 
Bloke I know cut one down to pistol size for Nick Cage for some gun runner movie. I fired it a few times and it had an impressive muzzle blast, particuarly at night. Apparently Cage loved the thing.

The piston bit was cut off and filed down, pretty much at the attachment to the carrier and a fair bit of the muzzle blast came out of the ejection port. Not good for the eyebrows or your night vision.
I tried out the micro-galil and it wasn't great shakes. In the days around when I joined (1980) I thought the ultra short versions were the dogs danglies for allyness. In practice I found them to have far too many drawbacks, like for example, the ones you mention. The M4 type seems to be the best tradeoff. Galil SAR was great but over-heavy. perhaps if IMI had had the means to produce it using a lighter alloy.........
 
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The G'lilon is ok for working indoors but anything shorter than that is taking the piss, I reckon. As it was, the shorter forestock meant my hand was quite far back when I gripped it, as I'd already had to make a conscious decision to use a shorter grip than my normal one to avoid getting a finger in front of the muzzle. The short grip meant my little finger was getting hammered by the cocking lever.

Chimp arms and banana paws will do that.
 
As I understand it, you not only store gash aircraft in your boneyard, it appears all the gash totty is also stored there as well.
Whereabouts is this place? Just asking out of idle curiosity.
It looks a bit like someone's garden path, I dunno....
 
The bent barrel attachments had very short lifespans – approx. 300 rounds for the 30° version, and 160 rounds for the 45° variant–as the barrel and bullets fired were put under great stress.

Wonder what lifespan the tit-shaped barrel had? :? :razz: :razz:
 
IDF half-track mine clearer variant (taken on Golan Heights, 1971)
When not needed the mine clearer attachment could be towed as in the pic.
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Were there many mines up there and how effective was the mine clearer?
The Golan heights are chocka with mines, pre-'67 Syrian as well as IDF. Minefields are clearly marked but there is an issue with winter weather dislodging and washing mines into unmarked areas.

I have no idea regarding the effectiveness of the half-track, I never knew of its existence until someone posted these pics on an Israeli forum today. I joined in 1980 and the only mine clearing gear reminiscent of this that I saw was on tanks. One commenter on the post said he worked on one of these on the Golan and in the Jordan Valley - he didn't mention anything about them not being effective.
 

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