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A Turning

Toland

Old-Salt
@Legs Thanks for the compliment. Started turning 10 years ago, kept me in the shed away from the wife.
It helps my mental wellbeing.
19221694_10155726169958268_5051268310945075318_o.jpg
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
@Legs Thanks for the compliment. Started turning 10 years ago, kept me in the shed away from the wife.
It helps my mental wellbeing.

Yep, that's what I got into it for. My workshop (a 16x10ft 'shed') is my dusty sanctuary. In there there is just me, some random bits of wood, a load of tools and some music or an audiobook. The outside world ceases to exist and all the stresses of life fade away for a few hours.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
I was asked by the Rector at my church if I would make a small tealight holder for our Curate (a Rector in training) for when he was frocked as a qualified Rector. So I had a dig through my wood drying store and found a random piece of an unknown species. And... Wow!

20201001_124415.jpg


It turned out to be Spalted Birch. The features and colours are amazing. To me, the endgrain looks like a Cheetah's markings. As with any spalted wood*, it was a little punky which was solved with the method above, but the finish of a Chestnut Products Hard Wax Oil really made it pop.

The newly frocked Rector was very happy to receive them.


*Spalted wood is actually formed by a fungus in wet but dead wood. This can make it hard to get a polish on it as the fungus can 'smear' and look grotty. That's why I use a Hard Wax Oil as a finish on most spalted woods.
 
I was asked by the Rector at my church if I would make a small tealight holder for our Curate (a Rector in training) for when he was frocked as a qualified Rector. So I had a dig through my wood drying store and found a random piece of an unknown species. And... Wow!

View attachment 513075

It turned out to be Spalted Birch. The features and colours are amazing. To me, the endgrain looks like a Cheetah's markings. As with any spalted wood*, it was a little punky which was solved with the method above, but the finish of a Chestnut Products Hard Wax Oil really made it pop.

The newly frocked Rector was very happy to receive them.


*Spalted wood is actually formed by a fungus in wet but dead wood. This can make it hard to get a polish on it as the fungus can 'smear' and look grotty. That's why I use a Hard Wax Oil as a finish on most spalted woods.
Legs That looks amazing
 
I was asked by the Rector at my church if I would make a small tealight holder for our Curate (a Rector in training) for when he was frocked as a qualified Rector. So I had a dig through my wood drying store and found a random piece of an unknown species. And... Wow!

View attachment 513075

It turned out to be Spalted Birch. The features and colours are amazing. To me, the endgrain looks like a Cheetah's markings. As with any spalted wood*, it was a little punky which was solved with the method above, but the finish of a Chestnut Products Hard Wax Oil really made it pop.

The newly frocked Rector was very happy to receive them.


*Spalted wood is actually formed by a fungus in wet but dead wood. This can make it hard to get a polish on it as the fungus can 'smear' and look grotty. That's why I use a Hard Wax Oil as a finish on most spalted woods.
Good grief Lass. What incredible skills. If only......:rolleyes:
 
Central Belt here too BTW.
I must think up some sort of worthwhile ( for me) useable "commission" piece I can have.
I have something in mind,
A base for a large & tall glass Caithness Glass stag...I'll give it a bit of thought.
Probably best you got the stag tbh to trace and work the bottom of it to sit in.
You best judge that idea.

It's not at all stable...we got it years back as a factory reject in Perth.

SWMBO's ears perked up.....she'd happily commission a solid base for this....thing. :rolleyes:


Totally no hurry incidentally.
Just PM us with your thoughts when it suits you.
 
Last edited:

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
As you are obviously not a million miles away from me (I'm not far from Livingston) I'd love to help you out. I'd really need the two pieces to makes something that fits perfectly.

With the stag, I'd think a piece of some gorgeous, reclaimed (from old church pews) Pitch Pine. Not the easiest stuff to turn (it needs a really gentle hand and the sharpest tools) but I think it would set the stag off beautifully with it's striking amber colours. I would then carve a recess for the base to fit snugly into. The ball light (Himalayan Rock Salt perchance?) would suit a much more plain wood. Maybe Ash. A highly figured wood would detract from the colours of the lamp. Simple to turn with a concave recess to hold the lamp.

Let me know.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I was asked by the Rector at my church if I would make a small tealight holder for our Curate (a Rector in training) for when he was frocked as a qualified Rector. So I had a dig through my wood drying store and found a random piece of an unknown species. And... Wow!

View attachment 513075

It turned out to be Spalted Birch. The features and colours are amazing. To me, the endgrain looks like a Cheetah's markings. As with any spalted wood*, it was a little punky which was solved with the method above, but the finish of a Chestnut Products Hard Wax Oil really made it pop.

The newly frocked Rector was very happy to receive them.


*Spalted wood is actually formed by a fungus in wet but dead wood. This can make it hard to get a polish on it as the fungus can 'smear' and look grotty. That's why I use a Hard Wax Oil as a finish on most spalted woods.
If I take a photo of myself in a frock can I have one:???::omfg:
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
As you are obviously not a million miles away from me (I'm not far from Livingston) I'd love to help you out. I'd really need the two pieces to makes something that fits perfectly.

With the stag, I'd think a piece of some gorgeous, reclaimed (from old church pews) Pitch Pine. Not the easiest stuff to turn (it needs a really gentle hand and the sharpest tools) but I think it would set the stag off beautifully with it's striking amber colours. I would then carve a recess for the base to fit snugly into. The ball light (Himalayan Rock Salt perchance?) would suit a much more plain wood. Maybe Ash. A highly figured wood would detract from the colours of the lamp. Simple to turn with a concave recess to hold the lamp.

Let me know.
Perfect. We want to leave the wood to you. Rock salt...correct!
Clearly you know best. ;)
SWMBO & I will swing by with both artefacts when the current restrictions ease a wee bit and let you get on with it at your convenience, and as time dictates.
However long it's fine.
Many thanks from us both.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
Keep on Turning with the Blind Woodturner 7/07/20
 

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