"A Reserve Force..." - Good Wavellroom.com article

conjurer

Old-Salt
Bit of a late post to the thread but once again someone at Land doesn't have a single clue how the real world works.

I've seen and had confirmed that a lot of units, including the OTC, are having a rigidly imposed ban on ALL extensions for personnel reaching the age of 55. Which has included chiefs. From experience, and I suspect other posters will confirm this, units only put requests for extensions in for people who benefit the unit. Those people tend to have qualifications and experience that is difficult to acquire for the average reservist so the policy will have a negative impact on the ability of units to function.
How many chiefs does the army need? :eek:
 
Not sure about CBRN but Phase 1 for an ARes soldier or officer does not qualify them as a trained shot. Note that an ARes infantry 2Lt post PCBC has still not qualified as a trained shot.
Probably hasn't qualified. 2Lt Gravelbelly might have disagreed with you...

Remember, by their nature the Reserves aren't as consistent as the Regulars; training doesn't (or rather, didn't) happen in a completely separate bubble, in a completely predictable sequence; the vagaries of course places and unit training have a significant effect. For instance, Reserves PCBC doesn't contain range management training - what happens if the unit does a complete range package, up to LFTT at Company level, before the course place for PCBC comes through? What happens if 2Lt Smith is qualified in range management before they head off to PCBC?
 
In this context, passed annual combat marksmanship test (ETR shoot) required for progression to individual and team field firing.
But by definition, the ACMT is a test (of what you've presumably been trained to do), not 'training' so how does that work?
 
A soldier who can not handle and fire competently is like a chef without a potato peeler.
 
More Reg/Reserve interface stuff.

I would gently suggest -

1/ This won't solve the network/hardware issues of defence (tbf, it is not supposed to - but coming into defence from private sector could a bit of a culture shock).
2/ Such skills tend to be in high demand in civillian life (I have lost count of the "there's x number of shortages in Cyber" studies I have seen) too. You're competing for talet.

How to retain that which you have trained within the organisation, whilst encouraging in the "immediate patch" of it specialists to bridge gaps?

Forces chief issues rallying cry to UK’s part-time tech warriors

Gen Sir Nick Carter says cyber experts could ‘move seamlessly’ between civilian and defence roles General Sir Nick Carter stands down as the UK’s chief of the defence staff in November Gen Sir Nick Carter stands down as the UK’s chief of the defence staff in November © Andrew Matthews/PA Share on Twitter (opens new window) Share on Facebook (opens new window) Share on LinkedIn (opens new window) Helen Warrell in London yesterday 57 Print this page The head of the UK’s armed forces has urged private sector cyber specialists and data engineers to sign up as reservists to help fill gaps in the military’s tech capabilities. General Sir Nick Carter, chief of the defence staff, is preparing for an era of stealthier, tech-enabled warfare as set out in Downing Street’s defence, security and foreign policy strategy for post-Brexit Britain. But the new plans have also prompted personnel cuts to help invest in new digital capabilities such as artificial intelligence and cyber. As the regular force is pared back and the demand for tech expertise rises, skilled reservists will be increasingly needed. “I think where we would like to get to is that we no longer distinguish between regulars and reservists particularly . . . that we have a spectrum of commitment from full to part-time service,” he told the FT, arguing that skilled personnel should be able to “move seamlessly” between civilian jobs and short-term defence deployments. Britain launches new global strategy Carter, 62, has spent four years leading the armed forces and undertook tours in Northern Ireland, Germany, Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq and Afghanistan during a career spanning more than four decades. He now has the task of implementing a demanding new strategy that promises to deploy “more forces overseas more often and for longer periods of time”. The departure last month of the HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier on a seven-month voyage to the Indo- Pacific — where the UK will increase its military presence to help counter China’s growing navy — has put British defence in the spotlight. Back at home, the “massive pace” of technological development is driving changes in the military that Carter admitted he did not see coming. Both China and Russia have potent cyber capabilities, while Beijing is investing heavily in military applications of AI. But the cutting-edge skills needed to compete are often found in the private sector rather than the military’s own ranks. “If you’d asked me five years ago how many data scientists and data engineers we wanted, I probably would have thought you were teasing me,” Carter said, adding this is now something he is “focused on”. Soldiers constructing a Nightingale hospital Soldiers constructing a Nightingale hospital in ExCel Centre in London during the Covid pandemic © Dave Jenkins/MoD/PA Military reservists from the private sector have been deployed widely during the Covid-19 pandemic, helping to build the Nightingale hospitals and organise the distribution of PPE. More recently, he said, data analysts from industry worked together with a team from the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory to help map a network of Isis fighters in the Middle East and “hone in” on a particular individual. ‘Call of Duty’ for real The Ministry of Defence might not need niche tech experts full time, or be able to afford them on permanent contracts, and Carter insisted there are mutual benefits from private sector employers releasing staff for deployments of three to six months. “We can provide that individual with opportunities that they might not get in the private sector,” he said, suggesting it would offer people the chance to move beyond gaming and “do ‘Call of Duty’ for real”. Column chart of Full-time UK army numbers ('000) showing The slow decline in size of the UK armed forces Reservists are paid by the MoD while on loan, and civilian salaries are matched in some cases, subject to a cap. Carter would not say how many private sector specialists he wants to recruit, and since the announcement in March that the Army will be cut from a target force of 82,000 to 72,500 by 2025, numbers have been a sore point for Britain’s defence chiefs. “I always have been frustrated by the fact that ill-informed people think you can measure the capability of the Army . . . on the basis of the total number of regular headcount in it,” he said, arguing that this ignores the additional impact of the reserve force. The Army currently has a reserve force of around 30,000, which includes former military personnel. Soldiers from the Duke of Lancaster Regiment take part in trialling virtual reality equipment at their home base in Chester, England. Soldiers from the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment take part in trials of virtual reality equipment at their home base in Chester, England. © Cpl Adam Wakefield/MoD “I’d rather talk about the Army [having] 100,000 human beings available at three months’ notice to move, but they also have 15,000 robots who are able to complement their activities,” Carter said. A key difficulty is finding the right balance between new kit such as robotics and traditional symbols of hard power. The defence review trumpeted flagship assets such as Britain’s nuclear capability — announcing a 40 per cent increase in the warhead stockpile — and the country’s two aircraft carriers, but also promised investments in space technology and high-speed missiles. Recommended The Big Read Challenging China: Brexit Britain experiments with battleship diplomacy Even with a surprise defence spending boost last autumn of £16.5bn, money will be tight: critics have suggested the strategy set out several options, but left many of the hard decisions unresolved. Carter disagreed. “For the first time in my memory, we’ve got the ends, the ways and the means, in balance,” he said. “There are not many militaries in Nato who are able to be as clear about that as we are.” Russian aggression risks escalation Rising threats have given urgency to the need to upgrade and reform. The armed forces chief revealed that Russia sent 11 warships, including a submarine, into British waters last November. Russian jets are “regularly” seen in UK airspace. The sightings in November were, he said, “more ostentatious than anything we’ve seen since the end of the cold war”, adding that this gave rise to the risk of “unwarranted escalation” and miscalculation, which could lead to conflict. Further east, Britain and its allies are grappling with China’s rapid military expansion. Last week Nato allies warned that Beijing poses “systemic challenges” to the rules-based international order, and Carter said the alliance had been “entirely right” to highlight China’s growing global ambition. Chinese military on exercise © Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images Through the Belt and Road Initiative, Beijing is “increasingly appearing in parts of the world which it didn’t used to be in”, Carter said. “Whether that’s parts of Africa that we used to hold dear, whether it’s a huge embassy that they’ve built in Antigua, a Commonwealth country, whether it’s conversations they’re having in Argentina, they are spreading their wings,” he said. The armed forces chief is due to step down from that role in late November, but first he must secure the withdrawal of British troops from Afghanistan, in line with the US decision to leave by the 20th anniversary of 9/11. Carter — who was deputy commander of Nato troops during his final Afghanistan tour — has already expressed regret at this move, saying it was “not a decision we had hoped for”. He admitted his fears that the withdrawal could spark instability, and said he is in regular dialogue with Afghan contacts about the country’s future. As for his own future, the general refuses to be drawn on who his successor might be (the leading candidates are the First Sea Lord Admiral Tony Radakin and head of strategic command General Sir Patrick Sanders). Instead, Carter retorts that he still has six months left in post, and there is plenty to be done. “We are not in a position that the king is dead yet,” he said.

 
More Reg/Reserve interface stuff.

“I think where we would like to get to is that we no longer distinguish between regulars and reservists particularly . . . that we have a spectrum of commitment from full to part-time service,” he told the FT, arguing that skilled personnel should be able to “move seamlessly” between civilian jobs and short-term defence deployments.

He is completely out of touch with the private sector economy if he thinks this is even remotely possible without some enabling primary legislation, and even then civvy employers will not be happy about it.
 
He is completely out of touch with the private sector economy if he thinks this is even remotely possible without some enabling primary legislation, and even then civvy employers will not be happy about it.

You're saying a man who has literally never had a private sector job is out of touch with the private sector? And he's being advised by those who are so successful running county shows in the "real world" that are also (full time) part time reservists also don't understand it?

Say it isn't so...
 
He is completely out of touch with the private sector economy if he thinks this is even remotely possible without some enabling primary legislation, and even then civvy employers will not be happy about it.

you too, @alfred_the_great

truth.jpg
 
He is completely out of touch with the private sector economy if he thinks this is even remotely possible without some enabling primary legislation, and even then civvy employers will not be happy about it.

the HSE (Irish NHS) was subject to a ransomware attack recently (not completely back yet) and apparently there has been a lot of good will shown by businesses to giving the HSE whatever it needs (probably due to covid as well in fairness).

it includes some reservists but it is mainly civilians
 
the HSE (Irish NHS) was subject to a ransomware attack recently (not completely back yet) and apparently there has been a lot of good will shown by businesses to giving the HSE whatever it needs (probably due to covid as well in fairness).

it includes some reservists but it is mainly civilians

Responding to an occasional crisis is one thing, especially one with overwhelming public support, but working part-time for another organisation, during normal working hours, where that other organisation may unpredictably decide it needs more of your time, as normal jogging, is something completely different. Given two equally qualified candidates why would a civvy employer ever hire a reservist in that situation? That's why it would need legislation to make reservists a protected class and also to provide some sweeteners for the employer so they're not out of pocket, or even that there are tangible advantages to having reservists on the books. It would be interesting to see how CDS thinks this would actually work and what he thinks employers motivations would be.
 

giatttt

War Hero
He is completely out of touch with the private sector economy if he thinks this is even remotely possible without some enabling primary legislation, and even then civvy employers will not be happy about it.

The private sector economy and it's employers are undoubtedly important things, but without understanding the motivation of the reservist then any cogitation is a waste of time.

The fringe benefits for a Cyber (other l33t skills are also in demand) specialist used to include playing with guns, driving trucks/tanks, jumping out of aircraft, and the chance for some underwater knife fighting. How many of those things are still on offer, when was the last time Cat C licenses were on offer?

I would suggest Gen Carter start with the question "what's in it for the reservist", and then move on to the loftier things.
 
It would be interesting to see how CDS thinks this would actually work and what he thinks employers motivations would be.


Obviously to get the gold award in the Defence Employer Recognition Scheme.



Most organisations who currently have that award are either state owned or heavily involved with the MOD.
 
The private sector economy and it's employers are undoubtedly important things, but without understanding the motivation of the reservist then any cogitation is a waste of time.

The fringe benefits for a Cyber (other l33t skills are also in demand) specialist used to include playing with guns, driving trucks/tanks, jumping out of aircraft, and the chance for some underwater knife fighting. How many of those things are still on offer, when was the last time Cat C licenses were on offer?

I would suggest Gen Carter start with the question "what's in it for the reservist", and then move on to the loftier things.

That's true, but very few reservists are in a position where they can simply chin off civvy employers. If the latter are not on board then any reservist who doesn't want to make the reserves their primary employer will be forced to choose, and the Army won't win that choice.
 
That's true, but very few reservists are in a position where they can simply chin off civvy employers. If the latter are not on board then any reservist who doesn't want to make the reserves their primary employer will be forced to choose, and the Army won't win that choice.

The Army does not and will not pay my mortgage.

Unless in a war of national survival, I think the Army has to understand the priority order.
 

Hopkins

Old-Salt
That's true, but very few reservists are in a position where they can simply chin off civvy employers. If the latter are not on board then any reservist who doesn't want to make the reserves their primary employer will be forced to choose, and the Army won't win that choice.

Many civi employers who have in the past been more than happy to support their staff being in the reserves (really support rather than just having the CEO wheeled out for a photo op signing a meaningless charter) are rather less prepared to support their staff working on open ended zero hours contracts for the MoD. Intellectually challenged army 'leadership':) seems to have forgotten the meaning of the term reserve.
 
The Army does not and will not pay my mortgage.

Unless in a war of national survival, I think the Army has to understand the priority order.

I think part of the problem in the Reserves atm is the fact there are "reservists" whose mortgages are absolutely paid for by the Army (and RN and RAF).
 
Top