A Little more help this time different

#1
I recently asked for help with a regiment ID.
This time however its for someone we know and have a lot of details on.
However me being an old Matelot sailor, do not understand how you guys would notate your battalions and units etc. so Can anyone help me with the answers to this?

It states on the Roll of individuals for the British war medal.
upload_2015-5-9_14-34-29.png



And on my grand dads Row.....

upload_2015-5-9_14-35-14.png

We know he was in the Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex) Regiment as a Machine Gunner.


So if anyone can help me decipher what that means , we are attempting to trace his history a little more in depth. What he did, where he went etc.
Seems they were a courageous lot !!
Thanks in advance
 
#2
It denotes that his was a Territorial Force Battalion.

A potted history of the Bn:

1/9th Battalion August 1914 : in Willesden Green. Part of Middlesex Brigade in Home Counties Division. Moved on mobilisation to Sheerness and then to Sittingbourne.
30 October 1914 : sailed from Southampton for India, arriving Bombay on 2 December 1914. The Bn eventually moved to Mesopotamia, arriving Basra on 24 November 1917, and joined the 53rd Brigade of the 18th Indian Division. It remained in that theatre until the end of the war.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
#3
I recently asked for help with a regiment ID.
This time however its for someone we know and have a lot of details on.
However me being an old Matelot sailor, do not understand how you guys would notate your battalions and units etc. so Can anyone help me with the answers to this?

It states on the Roll of individuals for the British war medal.
View attachment 201601


And on my grand dads Row.....

View attachment 201602
We know he was in the Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex) Regiment as a Machine Gunner.


So if anyone can help me decipher what that means , we are attempting to trace his history a little more in depth. What he did, where he went etc.
Seems they were a courageous lot !!
Thanks in advance
The 9th Bn was a Territorial unit of the First Line. I assume the 1325 is his Regtl number. Have you seen this titbit, up to 1916?

http://archive.org/stream/storyofdukeofcam00king#page/210/mode/2up

and a photo in India:


More:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/58031268@N03
 
#4
Thanks so much this has given us great insight.

A few questions
You say regimental number. He has a service number also . so what is a regimental number?
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
#5
Thanks so much this has given us great insight.

A few questions
You say regimental number. He has a service number also . so what is a regimental number?
I'm not an expert on WW1 but understand each Regt issued a soldier a number. If that soldier was posted to another unit he would get a new Regtl number. Eventually, don't know when, the system was standardised across the Army and you took your Service number with you.

Even so, people today still tend to say 'Regtl number'.
 
#6
I'm not an expert on WW1 but understand each Regt issued a soldier a number. If that soldier was posted to another unit he would get a new Regtl number. Eventually, don't know when, the system was standardised across the Army and you took your Service number with you.

Even so, people today still tend to say 'Regtl number'.
Up to 1920, when a common Army-wide system was introduced: see here http://www.1914-1918.net/prefixes.html
 
#7
Wow ...thanks
Great help for us as we are cross researching another family member...

but...
NCB Northern Cyclist Battalion

Really...they had someone for this?

o_O
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
#8
Wow ...thanks
Great help for us as we are cross researching another family member...

but...
NCB Northern Cyclist Battalion

Really...they had someone for this?

o_O
Of course, beats walking and is quicker:





Though, it's teethist not to allow the dentally challenged a cross-bar.
 
#12
I love that...bad teeth ...no bar ....like it made you a better cyclist....

would have though it would be better to trap the bugs hehe
Two decades ago, working in a training regiment in Scotland, one of the major dramas with many new recruits was the state of their teeth.
 

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