A litre of water's a pint and three quarters.

I just don't have a feel for what "hot" is in the other system. 12C. Is that warm? I *think* that's mid 50s, so I'd say "no, put a jumper on". But it might be coat weather. Just don't have a feel for it.
Me likewise, but in reverse. Fahrenheit temperatures are just noise, with no meaning for me.
 
Me likewise, but in reverse. Fahrenheit temperatures are just noise, with no meaning for me.

Which is fine, but seems odd to me, as you're a bit older than me. Have you always "thought" in C, or were you an "F" chap that converted? Did you do both at school, or was there a bias toward one or the other?
 
Which is fine, but seems odd to me, as you're a bit older than me. Have you always "thought" in C, or were you an "F" chap that converted? Did you do both at school, or was there a bias toward one or the other?
A bit older? Close to a decade and a half, young man!!

I can't really answer the question: I (kinda) know I was taught F and C at skule, but I was never cut out for science so post O-Levels it wasn't of much interest. It may be something as simple as having mostly driven VWs since my 20s, I was never faced with a choice on the temp gauge,

Whatever the explanation, I know 12C is not warm enough for shirtsleeves rolled up, but 20C is.
 
Type dependent. Some in kg, some in lbs and others show litres or just have a pointer with markings like your car fuel gauge.
Operator dependent at least for Boeing. Systems Manuals that are Boeing generic still quote both, Performance Manuals that are part of the operator’s Ops Manuals are (in our case) kg.
 

TheSockPuppet

On ROPS
On ROPs
I may be mistaken about the sizes theses days but last time I went to buy some wood for a diy job I went in with metric sizes of requirements and came out with 4x2 in 3m lengths and several sheets of 6’x4’ ply having been told by the wood yard guy that they don’t do metric. This would have been about 10 years ago.
Last week I looked around for some replacement fence panels which seem to be sold everywhere in 6’ widths and varying heights from 2’ to 6’.
Sheds also still seem to be sold in feet and inches.
As others have said, a persons
height and weight are still referenced in ft and inches and don’t the police still record suspect heights that way?
I couldn’t tell you what height I am in m but I know I’m 5’11” with a 9 in cock(give or take);) and I’d never dream of calculating my appendage in cm.

I’m absolutely no fan of the old imperial system of money, weights, length etc and I’m comfortable with the bits we’ve kept.

The only people getting teary eyed about this seem to be remain voters who like to shout about Brexiteers being dumb and wanting to return to Imperial.

FFS, stop reading and believing this shite for your own mental health.
I voted leave. It is possible to be rational and reasonable about units of measurement AND Brexit at the same time.
 
I voted leave. It is possible to be rational and reasonable about units of measurement AND Brexit at the same time.
I said as much and I agree whole heartedly.
Only a moron would want to return to fully imperial........the articles posted are just a rallying flag for remainers to sob about their beloved EU and to point and laugh at those wailing for a return to Imperial measures. I don't think they exist.
The remainers think they do, hence the article in the "Indy" lol.
 

Eyes_Right

Old-Salt
Is there a reason you've omitted the global superpower that is the USA when discussing the prospects of joining the powerhouses of Liberia and Myanmar in using imperial measurements?

I mean, I'm no fan of the imperial system, nor any sort of US fanboi, but a casual reader could conclude from your post that there are only 2 'powerhouses' using imperial.

Only to reinforce the joke from Black Adder, when they are looking for the German spy and the suspected nurse fails to recognize that out of "Oxford, Cambridge, and Hull", only two are great universities, to which Melchett replies "That's right. Oxford's a complete dump". Insert Liberia, Myanmar and the US as appropriate, rinse and repeat...
 

Troy

LE
A couple of thoughts not covered above:

What the yanks call a quart, is half a pint short...

Vehicle cab height displayed in feet and inches, but garage forecourts show height in Metres...
 
I was implying in my post cans of beer were initially sold as 550 ml / pint hence the use of the " ~ " sign ... I cannot recall seeing canned beer marked as 1 Pint .... another example of an opportunity seen by suppliers to gain an extra margin o fprofit by saving 18 ml per can .
Some brands do, Stella and Kronenbourg definitely do. It's actually more than you would get in a pub pint as they are legally allowed to include a certain percentage as 'head' (less than 10% sounds about right from memory). A 500ml can is pretty close to a pub 'pint'.

A pint glass holds 568ml but if you've got an inch of foam on top you're getting less than a pint of beer. The exception being the glasses with a 'pint to line' marking and space above for froth.

300x300.jpg
 
1976 the really hot summer....I was working as a petrol pump attendant. The pumps had a clock type display in gallons and 20ths of a gallon, and no price display.

Mental arithmetic to calculate the volume when people asked for £5 worth or rounding errors on partial gallons usually meant there was a gallon or two "free" to stick in my tank at the end of the shift
 
A couple of thoughts not covered above:

What the yanks call a quart, is half a pint short...

Vehicle cab height displayed in feet and inches, but garage forecourts show height in Metres...

How so? If an American describes something as a quart, obviously his reference is US units. If he'd said "an Imperial quart", but delivered a US quart, yes, it would be short. But that's not what's meant, obviously.
 
Which is fine, but seems odd to me, as you're a bit older than me. Have you always "thought" in C, or were you an "F" chap that converted? Did you do both at school, or was there a bias toward one or the other?
I’m a few years older than you (59 this year) and thought of weather temperature in Fahrenheit until I moved to Australia 11 years ago. Temperatures here are never quoted in F, so I’ve kind of got used to it slowly. Same with kilometres for road distances; I no longer mentally convert to miles.

Back to temperatures; I never had a concept of temperature in Fahrenheit for anything other than the weather. Cooking; has always been Celsius and anything engineering or science based, always C.
 
I’m a few years older than you (59 this year) and thought of weather temperature in Fahrenheit until I moved to Australia 11 years ago. Temperatures here are never quoted in F, so I’ve kind of got used to it slowly. Same with kilometres for road distances; I no longer mentally convert to miles.

Back to temperatures; I never had a concept of temperature in Fahrenheit for anything other than the weather. Cooking; has always been Celsius and anything engineering or science based, always C.

Similar to you, I've been immersed in US units and F for coming up on 17 years, and the stove means nothing to me in C units. I will admit the US is pretty steadfast in not using metric, outside of, as you say, engineering/physics/medical disciplines. I have plenty of rulers and tape measures that are only graduated in ft & inches, my BBQ thermometers have no C scale etc. Just no need, when you can't buy metric-sized building materials etc.
 

Troy

LE
How so? If an American describes something as a quart, obviously his reference is US units. If he'd said "an Imperial quart", but delivered a US quart, yes, it would be short. But that's not what's meant, obviously.
Because it's a "short-quart", like their ton is a short-ton. Short of a full measure. And it rhymes; "What the yanks call a quart is half a pint short." Along with "a pint of water weighs a pound and a quarter". A handy ditty to remind folk that US measures are shorter than the real thing.
 
All that blah blah was for commercial condition (packing)
Lost the source but it existes
England / Portugal had to revise their transport for wine...kegs became, what ever
Before USA existed
 
How come the USA stuff is 'short'?
Measures as they were on the Mayflower?
Inadequate measurement equipment? Inadequate maths?
Like Webster's Dictionary. Rationalising stuff.

Pint of water weighs 1 pound.

That 16oz to a pound is about as random as it gets, is not allowed to impinge, so you have rationalising perched on the arbitrary.
 
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