A levels at 16

#1
Hey all,

I'm in year 10 of my secondary school education and i've been wanting to join the RoyalMarines for quite some time now. I want to join at 16 as i can't bear waiting another second however i want to be an officer and as your all aware you need to hold at least your A levels to do so. I've looked into joining the Royal Marines Regulars whilst studying for my A levels however i was informed this wouldnt be possible as too much effort is required into training. I then thought it may be possible to join the army at 16, get basic training out the way with and then study my A levels and then leave the army and join the marines or possibly transfer over.

Any information or feedback is greatly appreciated thanks!

-Chocks
 
#3
Looking at the marines' standards and my current level of fitness i think it would be a great oppurtinity to join the army and do my a levels so it would give me a feel of military life and a boost into the marines and possibly if i want to just stay in the army as it is my second choice failing that im not good enough for the marines
 
#4
At 16 your body is still growing and you would not be able to cope with the physical requirements of the Marines for at least another year. Far better to stay in school and work hard for A levels. Joining one of the Cadet forces would give you some insight to aspects of the military and hopefully teach you about it.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#5
Any information or feedback is greatly appreciated thanks!

-Chocks
That's a bit of a jack attitude, join the Army and get them to pay for your further education and then fuck them over at 18 to join the Booties, do you understand the meaning of the words "loyalty" and "integrity"?
 
#6
Have you considered completing your education to degree level, joining the Army as an Officer then doing the Commando Course and serving with an Army Unit in support of the Marines?
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#8
they wouldnt be paying for my further education as the government pay for my A levels until 18
Not once you join up, it then comes out of the MoD budget. If you join at 16, you end up going to an AFC where education and military training take place.
 
#9
Your best bet is to stay in school, smash the A Levels, do loads of sport and fitness-type activities and get yourself as prepared as possible. Go and do some things. Challenge yourself. Prove you've got some 'life experience' when it comes to joining. It takes a lot more than just A Levels to get into the armed forces as an officer, especially the Royal Marines, who have the toughest officer training of all. The selection will be equally challenging, and one of the main things they'll be looking at is whether or not you'll be suitable to lead a load of blokes who will mostly be older than you, joining so young. If you've gone from school straight into officer selection at 17 odd I'd go so far as to say you may struggle to convince them you're an ideal candidate with no other experience to bring to the party.

The army option is also one you can take, though depending what trade you join will determine how viable the A Level plan is. The government will most likely pay for it, but you won't have a lot of time to study whilst you go through Phase 1 and Phase 2 training, so you may find it won't be until you're 18/19 that you actually finish the qualifications. Additionally, it's fairly difficult to get 'released' from the army to transfer service prior to your return of service being completed. It was hard for me to transfer service even when mine had well passed. You would, however, have a bit more experience when and if you go for the selection.

Best advice, stay in school, do loads of stuff the military like to see and prepare yourself as best as possible. Go on unit visits all over the place, not just to the Marines. Show you're a versatile individual and all that good stuff. Then join when you've sorted your quals out.
 
#10
Do your A Levels, then worry about your career*. You might also consider uni, if you really want to be an officer. Both the Army and RM are highly competitive; A Levels are the bare minimum.


(* Take it from someone who dropped out of A Levels to join up early)

Sent from my G8441 using Tapatalk
 
#11
Even *if* you make to Lympstone or Sandhurst with just A Levels, you're effectively setting yourself up for a major career foul downstream as you'll be a degree behind the bulk of your peers as a Lieutenant and probably two degrees behind as a Major.

Never mind that, though - if you want to be an officer, to lead soldiers, you owe it to them to ensure you're in the best possible state to do so - mature, well-trained and well-educated. I'd submit that an 18-year old with A Levels isn't going to impress too many squaddies nowadays - in fact, in some cap badges, the 18-year-old'd find he was commanding folk older and better-qualified than they were.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#12
Understand that you are most likely to spend far more of your working life as a civilian than you will in uniform. Concentrate on getting a good clutch of useful qualifications - before, during and after your service.
 
#13
At 16 your body is still growing and you would not be able to cope with the physical requirements of the Marines for at least another year. Far better to stay in school and work hard for A levels. Joining one of the Cadet forces would give you some insight to aspects of the military and hopefully teach you about it.
Don't wish to be provocative but your first sentence is a crock.

My son joined at 16. He coped.
 
#14
"OK son, why do you want to join the Army?"

"Well Sgt, I'd like to get my shit in one sock before I join the Marines".

"The Navy recruiting bloke is at that desk over there. Don't waste my time, or yours."
 
#15
At 16 your body is still growing and you would not be able to cope with the physical requirements of the Marines for at least another year. Far better to stay in school and work hard for A levels. Joining one of the Cadet forces would give you some insight to aspects of the military and hopefully teach you about it.
Not strictly true, I passed P Coy at 17, the youngest on the course. For me it was a natural progression from juniors; being beasted daily there made P Coy far easier than for someone 10 years older for example who'd done the normal 8-5 army.
 
#16
Looking at the marines' standards and my current level of fitness i think it would be a great oppurtinity to join the army and do my a levels so it would give me a feel of military life and a boost into the marines and possibly if i want to just stay in the army as it is my second choice failing that im not good enough for the marines
As a general rule, joining the army to improve your fitness to allow you to join the marines isn't a particularly good way to go.

The forces aren't going anywhere. Get your education sorted and take your time.
 
#17
Don't be a t***. Do your A-levels first. You have no guarantee that you will even complete phase one training.
As others have already told you. The forces will still be there in two years time.
 
#18
Why not try Wellbeck Military College? You will continue your education and still be able to join up. Do not squander the time you have to learn now, yes you could do your A levels while you serve, easier said than done. Also you have to sign for a minimum of 4 years. Believe me if I could have my time again I’d stay on in school and even look at University. If you want to be and have the aptitude to be an officer, put the hard work in now.

Also what sort of trade do you want in the Marines or Army for that matter?

Check out this link for Wellbeck.

Home | Welbeck The Defence 6th Form College
 
#19
In my experience as a recruiter, those Joining the Army in preparation for later joining the Royal Marines, very seldom do.

Reason? Things like minimum return of service, being four years older, having acquired promotional seniority & a higher rate of pay make the prospect of starting again from scratch, on the new entry rate of pay, far from appealing - especially with as much as a 50% attrition rate.

Many students aspiring to become RM Officers, join the RMR. The RMR is intended to flexibly augment the trained strength rather than provide work experience but they tend to be more accepting of those joining short term.

Only about one in four RMR recruits who pass selection and start RMR recruit training actually finish it. Those that do either find they prefer to be a reservist and earn a higher civilian wage in the private sector or take the plunge and start RM Officer training from scratch, older, wiser & better prepared.

By the way, there's a handy little RM forum here which you may find useful, if you haven't seen it already: Royal Marines - Join the Regular and RMR Commandos
 
#20
Every time something like this comes up, I say the same thing. Spend as long in education as possible. Definitely get your A-levels. Whilst I don't think degrees get you extra seniority now, if you are academically capable, do it first. For 2 reasons - one it is really hard to get back to and two, it will benefit you when you come out of the military. This whole idea of joining one service to tide over until another, is not a good example of officer thinking. Be patient, do the preparation, it is more mature and probably more honest.

If you can't take the numerous examples of good advice given here, you are extremely unlikely to pass AIB and be offered the attempt to commission..
 

Latest Threads

Top