A land unfit for heroes

#1
This week, Falklands war veterans commemorate their victory 25 years ago. About 300 men who came home will be missing from the parades. They have killed themselves. Many more are battling suicide, and veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan are swelling their ranks. This is their story — and they’re angry

in Full

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article1899458.ece
 
#2
Just goes to show, 25yrs later and the powers that be still don't give a s##t. How many more have to die before they do something?
 
#3
Shocking, and if the quacks know their stuff, about 10 years from now we will see a lot of "late onset PTSD" from the lads on Herrick/Telic now.

I would suggest MoD and NHS get together and sort their sh1t out, STAT!
 
#4
As a young soldier going through Catterick at the time, I find this Shocking.
 
#5
It makes me both sad and bitter to witness the incompetence and multiple pathetic attempts of the government to try and rationalise their woeful lack of action for ex soldiers.
This problem could and should have by now been given the highest priority due to it's profile in the media. Dedicated teams analysing and sugesting relevant courses of action........But no!

I don't regret a single moment in uniform, however this horrendous treatment of our colleagues proves for me that I left at the right time.


fastmedic
 
#6
I have also being fighting PTSD for the last thirty-five years since N.I. in the early 70´s, I have over the last seventeen years spent months in a Civilian Hospital undergoing therapy for PTSD, At one of the sessions I was one of about ten people who were to talk openly about their feelings and experiences, after about ten minutes of me opening up, I was told to leave the room as, It was thought that, “Civilians should not be exposed to such stories “ I spent the next ten or so sessions with my mouth shut,
There is no way a civy could understand what we went through...
 
#7
This was just unbelievable reading, saddening that young lives then have been blighted for so many years. What a country, how do we allow this to happen and to continue to happen? The least I can do now is to make a contribution to combat stress. Civilian hospitals could not deal with these kind of problems, so as we see they are just left to fend for themselves. Truly disturbing.
 
#9
ex-gunner wrote
There is no way a civy could understand what we went through...
seconded, they live on another planet and most just dont care

WW
 
#10
ex-gunner said:
I have also being fighting PTSD for the last thirty-five years since N.I. in the early 70´s, I have over the last seventeen years spent months in a Civilian Hospital undergoing therapy for PTSD, At one of the sessions I was one of about ten people who were to talk openly about their feelings and experiences, after about ten minutes of me opening up, I was told to leave the room as, It was thought that, “Civilians should not be exposed to such stories “ I spent the next ten or so sessions with my mouth shut,
There is no way a civy could understand what we went through...
This is true, but many civvy's are becoming more aware of the trauma and abandonment suffered by you all. Positive campaigning and articles through the better media helps, but sometimes this, "us and them" attitude can be unhelpful. The British people do care.

It's unbelievable how the British Armed Forces are treated by the Government, during and after their service to this country.

I am trying to understand more about where you are all coming from. If I was to rely on the British press like other civilians, it's no wonder the associated problems and lives of our military are forgotten. A few lines on an inside page about our fallen war heros is a disgrace. The front pages are given over to druggy supermodels and spoilt little rich girls.
 
#11
Fair play to Micheal Bilton and his researchers in producing such an informing piece.

I so hope that over the tea and toast this morning, that those who can do something about this awful state of affairs in Whitehall and the shires, actually take onboard the information and take action. NOW

My heartfelt feelings for all of the former soldiers who contributed to a very powerful article, and Les Standish in particular - wherever you all are now guys, know that there are some, who really do care.

Absolute respect for every last one them, and the families of those killed as a result of The Falklands War.

Yet again, the sheer incompetence of successive governments, that have failed to look after our armed forces is put into sharp focus. It is a disgrace that shames our nation and in particular the men and women, that we send into battle.
 
#12
In May l sent a letter to Derek Tw*T (twigg) our dear leader of Veterans, about the Non -Treatment that I was not getting at my local NHS Trust (Surrey).

This is what, I was sent back.

Ministry of Defence
Dr. ***. CBE, Director Service Personnel Policy(medical adviser)
Whitehall, London


Dear Mr Monsstar,

I have been asked to reply to your letter of 1st May 2007 to Mr Derek Tw*t(twigg), Minister for Veterans.

Thank you for raising these issues. As you know, since the setting up of the NHS it has been the view of successive governments that the main route for healthcare for veterans and war pensioners should be the NHS. In addition, for accepted conditions, war pensioners are entitled to priority NHS treatment. Priority is decided by the clinician in charge of the case and it not an absolute priority linked to war pensioner status but depends on the clinician's judgement of the person's clinical need.

Regular reminders are sent out by the Health Departments to Chief Executives of Trusts and Health Authorities requiring them to ensure that GPs and hospital clinical staff are aware of the provision. As you will understand, I am not able to comment on the specifics of your case but problems related to Priority Treatment or other aspects of care should be raised by patients through the NHS Complaints System. Details of that should be available locally.

You speak also of Combat Stress. Combat Stress is indeed a charity. However about £3 million of public funds are allocated annually to qualifying war pensioners to undergo treatment at the Society's homes.

Combat Stress is, of course, not intended to be a replacement for the NHS. Indeed the treatment funded under the War Pensions scheme is not provided under the NHS. I note your suggestion that because your war pension is assessed at 20% funded treatment at Combat Stress is precluded. That is not my understanding. It is open to you to apply to the SPVA for remedial treatment at Combat Stress. Each case is considered on its merits and clinical appropriateness.

Finally, you make reference to recent statements by Mr Tw*t's(twigg) concerning the importance he attaches to delivery of excellent health services for veterans.

At present, officials from MoD-the four UK health departments and Combat Stress, advised by national clinical experts, are working together to implement a new community based mental health service for veterans. This is to be piloted across the country hopefully beginning this summer. We are very anxious to improve understanding of military and veterans' matters amongst civilian health professionals and hope this new model, which involves military and civilian specialists working together, will help to achieve this. Six pilots located across the UK will run for 2 years. After that there will be national roll-out.

I hope you find this helpful and thank you for raising these matters.


All I can say to your recent correspondence is, 'having read the letter of your views, on matter's of policy'. Can you please inform me, why you feel yourself to have the necessary qualities to legislate for me?
 
#13
wheelchairwarrier said:
ex-gunner wrote
There is no way a civy could understand what we went through...
seconded, they live on another planet and most just dont care

WW
some care ww - it is the government who don't seem to

edited to add: £3 million per year to combat stress for war pensioners? Is that all? unbelievable
 
#14
ex-gunner said:
I have also being fighting PTSD for the last thirty-five years since N.I. in the early 70´s, I have over the last seventeen years spent months in a Civilian Hospital undergoing therapy for PTSD, At one of the sessions I was one of about ten people who were to talk openly about their feelings and experiences, after about ten minutes of me opening up, I was told to leave the room as, It was thought that, “Civilians should not be exposed to such stories “ I spent the next ten or so sessions with my mouth shut,
There is no way a civy could understand what we went through...
Funny you should mention that. I was diagnosed PTSD in 1995 by a civilian doctor and referred to West Paddock in Leyland. Psychiatrist there would not allow group therapy which would not have helped at all with civilians. Was sent away with the anti-depressant drug 'Seroxtat', which did not help at all, in fact, it made me even more depressed than I already was at that time so I stopped taking it. Years later, Seroxtat was found to be a contributory cause of suicides among the young!

PTSD cost me my wife and children, my home and permanant alianation from my parents and siblings while the major beneficiaries of it were the shareholders of a variety of UK-based breweries!

It took a long time to build a life from rock-bottom with help from complete strangers!

Ever been presented with the 'kiss of death' job application form which asks "have you ever been diagnosed as suffering from a mental illness or disorder.?

Not on my pre-release medical I wasnt, I was 222221122 FE!
 
#15
wheelchairwarrier wrote:
ex-gunner wrote
Quote::
There is no way a civy could understand what we went through...
seconded, they live on another planet and most just dont care

WW
some care ww - it is the government who don't seem to
Problem is that some of the population believe what the government say ,some think life is one continual television reality program and the remainder seem to be ARRSE members , the only group I have respect for. Poppy, I know some care it's the rest that grip my stuff.
WW
 
#16
Not only is 'Peter' pontificating about things that he has no understanding of, I wonder how he thinks that
pilots who are killed or injured in aircraft accidents
are going to claim compensation? Moron.

When you consider that the government spends £200+ Billion on quangos promoting stuff such as creating better communities through the language of dance, £3m for combatting stress amongst war pensioners is utterly shameful. However, since the govt apparently has no shame, this is going to pass them by.
 
#17
ex-gunner said:
I have also being fighting PTSD for the last thirty-five years since N.I. in the early 70´s, I have over the last seventeen years spent months in a Civilian Hospital undergoing therapy for PTSD, At one of the sessions I was one of about ten people who were to talk openly about their feelings and experiences, after about ten minutes of me opening up, I was told to leave the room as, It was thought that, “Civilians should not be exposed to such stories “ I spent the next ten or so sessions with my mouth shut,
There is no way a civy could understand what we went through...
Such a sad state of affairs. Civilians should be aware of the FULL story of soldiers once the glory and victory of battele/war is over and soldiers stories should not be hidden away like some sort of guilty secret.

I watched a Zulu documentary the other night and some of the survivors from Rorke's Drift has serious PTSD (of course it wasn't called that back then) and one shot himself in his backyard in Manchester screaming that the 'Zulus were coming' and another sold his VC to make ends meet and spent his final days in a workhouse. The point is that things haven't changed much today even though combat stress is now a recognisable disorder.
 
#18
I have little time for this government but reading the reply I took it to mean that 3 million was allocated to "Combat Stress" (The organisation) not to the treatment of combat stress. It would appear that some people Aat MOD do actually care and are trying but knowing the way bureaucracy works it will be an uphill struggle.
 
#19
ex-gunner said:
“Civilians should not be exposed to such stories “
Quite right too, the weak individuals that they are.

A service life would kill 10 civvies, just reading about it.

There should be proper care set up for old and not so old soldiers returning to the more delicate way of life that is civvie street.
 
#20
Unfortunately it seems the vast majority of the Govt./MOD hold your average serviceman on a par with something that they have stepped on in the street, once that person no longer even serves they cease to exist. It's high time that people realised the full extend of the damage caused to the average human body both physically and mentally by service in the military, after all where would they be without the forces to backup their 'well though out' policies. A good start would be a dedicated support agency for those who need it, run and staffed by people who can understand the conditions affecting ex-servicemen.
 

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