A HAPPY VALLEY (Valley of Tears) (Not to be confused with a Police TV Series).

I'd always thought that getting Irish troops to man a tank named after Cromwell was a bit blinkered, even by WW2 standards. What could possibly go wrong?

We were never very tactful when it came to naming military hardware and places.

I went to Lancaster and Wellington schools in Osnabruck.
 
The IDF never got it's head around the concept of IFVs.

I heard horror stories from 67 of mechanised infantry riding into battle against the Jordanians in open topped WW2 half tracks.

My Company on the border with Lebanon in 1981 had two half tracks. We used one for the daytime border patrol and the other for the company QRF - Half tracks were still in widespread use with IDF reserve units in the Lebanon war in 1982, usually for specialist units, such as the infantry combat engineers in this pic.

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prior to the M113 we had half tracks and the IDF applied the same AFV concept to them.
All the deficiencies were taken into consideration and now we have the Na-mer, but they cost about $3 million each.

Cracking bit of kit though, is Na-mer.
MHO is that that level of protection will soon become the norm. If you really want infantry to go into the jaws of the maelstrom riding right behind the tanks you'll need all the armour plate you can get. Furthermore, Israel and the west really don't do football game attendance levels of casualties any more. TBF, neither do the Russians.
With approx 3K dead, 8k wounded ( nearly 4k cas a week ) and 1K tanks destroyed or damaged during Yom-Kippur -with our current levels off manning and gear, we'd be knackered after week 1.
 
Cracking bit of kit though, is Na-mer.
MHO is that that level of protection will soon become the norm. If you really want infantry to go into the jaws of the maelstrom riding right behind the tanks you'll need all the armour plate you can get. Furthermore, Israel and the west really don't do football game attendance levels of casualties any more. TBF, neither do the Russians.
With approx 3K dead, 8k wounded ( nearly 4k cas a week ) and 1K tanks destroyed or damaged during Yom-Kippur -with our current levels off manning and gear, we'd be knackered after week 1.

BAOR was expected to take 10% casualties per day making a fighting retreat on the North German Plain. A divisional counterstroke would simply have been fatal for most soldiers involved. That's a carpet of mass graves from the IGB to the Weser.

The government was reportedly ready to accept 1,000 dead in the Falklands - that's a big bite out of the Task Force.

People don't realise that a major peer to peer war is a runaway meatgrinder. If you're in the thick of it, the best kit in the world might extend your life by another day. Maybe.
 

Londo

LE
Came up on my FB feed
A rare picture of an Israeli Centurion in deep snow at the Golan Heights, 1974.
Photo by Rony Aharonov
rare pic.jpg
 
At the end of Winter of 1991-92 my reserves company manned the 3 highest IDF positions on Mt Hermon. The altitude of my platoon's position was 2024 metres. The winter had been the worst for 80 years, causing serious flooding, snow in the Jerusalem hills that caused thousands of trees to collapse under its weight and general discomfort.
The positions we took over had been cut off for weeks and replenished using Sikorsky helicopters (because they were capable of hauling a load in that altitude and those conditions). The position's M60 (Magach 7) tank (used at night for TOGS ambushes) had been completely buried under the snow.
I spent several month-long reserve duty periods up there - the weather could get really extreme.
 
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First glimpse of the sun after a week long ice storm. The higher peak is Syrian but supposedly demilitarized, with only a UN OP there.
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BAOR was expected to take 10% casualties per day making a fighting retreat on the North German Plain. A divisional counterstroke would simply have been fatal for most soldiers involved. That's a carpet of mass graves from the IGB to the Weser.

The government was reportedly ready to accept 1,000 dead in the Falklands - that's a big bite out of the Task Force.

People don't realise that a major peer to peer war is a runaway meatgrinder. If you're in the thick of it, the best kit in the world might extend your life by another day. Maybe.
I believe that 600 collapsible coffins went down with the Atlantic Conveyor (amongst more vital equipment).
 
prior to the M113 we had half tracks and the IDF applied the same AFV concept to them.
All the deficiencies were taken into consideration and now we have the Na-mer, but they cost about $3 million each.
Aren’t there also still Centurions converted to APCs and AEVs?
 

NSP

LE
Having seen this thread I've DL'd the series. Just starting episode two. Episode one ends with a Cent' troop blatting a couple of columns of Syrian T-55s. Commanders all call for a loading of HESH ("squash head") and the loaders all reach for, lift and load what looks distinctly like APDS...
 
I've only watched 2 episodes so far, seems OK to me.

It reminded me of a Mark Felton video on YT about Panzers, I've just checked and it related to the '67 war, not Yom Kippur. It's interesting nonetheless.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Having seen this thread I've DL'd the series. Just starting episode two. Episode one ends with a Cent' troop blatting a couple of columns of Syrian T-55s. Commanders all call for a loading of HESH ("squash head") and the loaders all reach for, lift and load what looks distinctly like APDS...
Correct. See a good few pages back.
 
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