A Guitar owner's thread

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I’m on a roll with the Facebook marketplace bargains today.

Now there’s a backstory here.

My step dad is a very proficient bassist. He was in a metal band in the 80s that was on the verge of making it big before they all did way too many drugs and it went to pot. They even performed live on Radio 1.

Anyway he’s pretty ******* good.

He’s always rated Warwick basses but could never really afford one.

About 20 years back I’m in a guitar shop in Milton Keynes and I spot an unbranded Warwick copy. Seemed to be very nicely made and to all intents and purposes appeared to be identical to a real Warwick, with the exception of the little Warwick “W” on the headstock.

It had a sticker on the back saying “Cort” who I knew to be a fairly middle of the road, but we’ll regarded Korean brand.

It was about 125 quid, so I phoned my mum, got her to transfer some dosh and I bought it. We gave it to him for Christmas.

He was well chuffed. Still has it to this day and rates it very highly. He’s even put a Warwick logo on the headstock so it looks like the real deal. He’s now got a couple of real Warwicks and this sits proudly along side them. You really can’t tell the difference at all. It actually looks nicer than one of the real ones he’s got.

He liked it so much he even contacted Cort wondering if he could buy another one, or if they made any in different colours etc.

Curiously they denied all knowledge, flat denying that they had ever built a Warwick copy or anything resembling a Warwick.

Lawsuit maybe?

It remains a mystery to this day as to what this bass really is. We have never seen another one.

And then this evening, this pops up on Facebook marketplace. Weirdly I wasn’t even looking at Facebook marketplace, I got a notification saying “there is an item you may be interested in.”

Weird, this has never happened before and I have my notification settings fairly well locked down.

I open it up and it’s the same guitar.

For 40 ******* quid.

40 quid.

2 hour round trip to go and get it, but 100% worth it. I think this one is even nicer than the other one. Nicer piece of wood on it.

It weighs a ton.

8E42A0CE-EE4E-4CCB-811D-1FE43BA6B618.jpeg
 
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I’m on a roll with the Facebook marketplace bargains today.

Now there’s a backstory here.

My step dad is a very proficient bassist. He was in a metal band in the 80s that was on the verge of making it big before they all did way too many drugs and it went to pot. They even performed live on Radio 1.

Anyway he’s pretty ******* good.

He’s always rated Warwick basses but could never really afford one.

About 20 years back I’m in a guitar shop in Milton Keynes and I spot an unbranded Warwick copy. Seemed to be very nicely made and to all intents and purposes appeared to be identical to a real Warwick, with the exception of the little Warwick “W” on the headstock.

It had a sticker on the back saying “Cort” who I knew to be a fairly middle of the road, but we’ll regarded Korean brand.

It was about 125 quid, so I phoned my mum, got her to transfer some dosh and I bought it. We gave it to him for Christmas.

He was well chuffed. Still has it to this day and rates it very highly. He’s even put a Warwick logo on the headstock so it looks like the real deal. He’s now got a couple of real Warwicks and this sits proudly along side them. You really can’t tell the difference at all. It actually looks nicer than one of the real ones he’s got.

He liked it so much he even contacted Cort wondering if he could buy another one, or if they made any in different colours etc.

Curiously they denied all knowledge, flat denying that they had ever built a Warwick copy or anything resembling a Warwick.

Lawsuit maybe?

It remains a mystery to this day as to what this bass really is. We have never seen another one.

And then this evening, this pops up on Facebook marketplace. Weirdly I wasn’t even looking at Facebook marketplace, I got a notification saying “there is an item you may be interested in.”

Weird, this has never happened before and I have my notification settings fairly well locked down.

I open it up and it’s the same guitar.

For 40 ******* quid.

40 quid.

2 hour round trip to go and get it, but 100% worth it. I think this one is even nicer than the other one. Nicer piece of wood on it.

It weighs a ton.

View attachment 485453
Great story.

I looked at that and thought 'now there's a Warwick Thumb NT?' I've never seen before...what wood is that?

Then I read the text.

I always loved them but only got to play them in a store when I was in my 20's and keen and in a metal band...I finally got a Thumb NT second hand about 5 years ago...it was worth the wait.

That looks as much like a Warwick as a Warwick...love it and the fact you got another for a snip of a price too.
 

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Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
We watched School of Rock last night and now both the sprogs are interested in getting guitars.

I started them off a few years back with a cheapo half size acoustic but as with most of these things it’s barely playable due to the strings being about 4 inches away from the fingerboard.

Having said that they have both shown some early promise with it.

So time to upgrade.

Looking for 3/4 size electric guitars. Problem is the boy is a lefty so I need to get two. One for him, one for the girl.

There doesn’t seem to be much choice at all for southpaws. The obvious choice when it comes to 3/4 electrics for the small lady is the Squier mini strat, but they don’t do lefty ones

I could go full Jimmy Hendrix and string one upside down but I don’t think it’d make life that easy for him.

Other option is to go full size but he’s only 9.

Any experience of starting kids out on full size guitars?
What do Jimi Hendrix, George Harrison and Pete Townsend all have in common?

CLUE

Have a look at this -

.

Ukuleles come in all electric, acoustic-electric and left-handed versions.


It's a great Entry-level instrument for small people who (you hope) will move on to it's overgrown cousin when they are taller.

SOURCE

The story of the ukulele starts in Europe. By the 18th Century stringed, fretted instruments had a long history. Larger instruments such as guitars and lutes had developed smaller cousins of particular benefit for sea-faring musicians. In Portugal the guitar had shrunk down to became a machete – retaining the figure of 8 shape despite the size making it redundant.

In 1879 the SS Ravenscraig set off for Hawaii with four Portuguese cabinet makers on board. The market for large, ornate Portguese furniture amongst Hawaii’s largely poor and agrarian population presumably not being large enough to support them all, the four started to make instruments. The one that took hold was the machete in a new form.

The truth behind much ukulele mythology that surrounds the ukulele – where it got its name, the tuning and ‘my dog has fleas’ – is mostly lost to us. What is true is that the uke became a big hit with the Hawaiian Royal Family and the Hawaiians in general and had become firmly established as their instrument by the start of the 20th Century.

After the US’s annexation of Hawaii – or when the, “business men stole Hawaii from the Hawaiians” as Bob Brozman puts it – the new owners were keen to sell it on to mainland America as a dream tropical island. Their big push was the Panama Pacific international Exposition in 1915. Their show included plenty of ukulele music and featured the ukuleles of Jonnah Kumalae. It sparked the original ukulele boom in the 1920s amoungst people dreaming of a mythical island getaway.

The ukulele started to move away from purely a Hawaiian novelty and became such a part of music making that by the start of the 30s most piano scores featured ukulele chord diagrams. Thanks to Ukulele Ike, the uke’s image turned almost 180 degrees to become associated with smoky bars, trilbies and jazzy songs.

When Wall Street collapsed in 1928 the economy and the uke’s popularity in the US took a big dive.
However, the uke – in it’s louder, harsher banjolele form – started growing in popularity in music halls of the UK. The biggest star of the era was George Formby whose banjolele strumming was the sound of the Second World War.

WWII also provided an impetus for the revival of the ukulele in the US. Troops returned with souvenir ukuleles from Hawaii and the islands’ accession to offical US statehood proved the perfect occasion for a celebratory strumming.

The booming consumer economy of 1950′s US saw mass produced plastic goods flooding shops. The ukulele was a prime instrument for mass selling to kids and – jazz guitar manufacturer – Maccaferri jumped on the opportunity with their ranges of plastic ukes.

This was bolstered by the use of the ukulele by huge TV star Arthur Godfrey and the second ukulele boom came into being. The rather less aspirational figure of Tiny Tim was the soundtrack to the uke’s crashing popularity in the 60s and 70s.

For most of the 90s alternative music scene was dominated by traditional guitar bands and, as a reaction to this, the first decade of the 200s saw a growing acoustic alternative scene using more eclectic sounds and more unusual instrumentation. The ukulele found its place in this sound with bands like `The Magnetic Fields’.

Two huge trends that helped bring the ukulele back to popularity were the proliferation of the internet and the huge increase in imports from China and the East. The internet has put ukulele music in front of people and has created a groundswell growth of people being inspired to pick up the instrument by others like themselves who are playing for their own enjoyment rather than superstardom.


Lastly, for anyone who is unaware of these folk :
 
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My grandson is learning to play the guitar but he has outgrown the 2/3 nylon string accoustic I bought him some 18 months ago. Everytime he visits he likes tp play with my Yamaha electric/accoustic which he is fast growing into.

I used to play the Yamaha a lot but, with increasing problems with arthritis, I now find the fretboard too narrow for my clumsy fingers.

I have told grandson that he can "borrow" the Yamaha as long as he looks after it.

Naturally, I can't have a blank space on the wall where the Yamaha used to be so I called in at my local guitar shop this morning - we actually have two music shops in the town but the one I tend to use always has some nice stuff and the staff are very helpful. I know I could buy online for cheaper, but I always like to support small local companies and in any case they will let me sit for half an hour or more trying the various guitars. Plus they knockedsome cash off a gig bag and some spare strings as well.

I came home with this - Epiphone EJ-200SCE Southern Jumbo Acoustic/Electric

epiphone.jpg


I had tried several other guitars (in the other shop which is closer to home) on my way home from work on saturday - Fender accoustic, Ibanez and some other make suggested by the guitar bloke behind the counter but they didn't do anything for me.

I sat down with the Epiphone and just fell in love with the sound from the jumbo body. It is light enough for playing quiet songs but also has a depth of sound for bashing out Zeppelin's "when the levee breaks"...

With me, if the guitar doesn't grab me within five minutes I know there is no point in buying it, because I won't like it. This one felt perfect.

I am a very happy teddy today... :)
 

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