A Guitar owner's thread

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
View attachment 444395

I was after a BB King Lucille but they seemed like they were out of stock at most of the usual online guitar shops until March.
I decided I'd go for a baritone guitar instead.
This is a PRS 227 Baritone in night fire. It's a beautiful looking and sounding thing and the first new guitar that hasn't needed any setting up or sorting out.
The humbuckers are coil tapped so you can get this strange sensation of sounding bright like a Telecaster but several notes further down the scale. It also does dark and dirty nicely.

Now the endless quest to figure out which amp and pedals to match with it starts. I currently have it running through a Park bass amp and a Vox Ac 4 valve amp via a DI signal switcher or splitter.
Beautiful guitar, I love PRSs.
 

Carbon 6

Old-Salt
Interesting article from 'Reverb'

The article was spot on about Gibson's quality control in the late sixties. My first 'good' guitar was a 1969 SG Standard which I ordered out of their catalogue. As a young lad, I thought it was wonderful, until I got it home and started finding loose frets, dead spots all over the fretboard and the bridge saddles not even close to where they should've been. It took me a while to figure out how to dress the frets and set the action and intonation properly.
 
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I saw this at the weekend, 1954 Strat, I was quite taken with the aging process, makes a change to see the real thing rather than the usual relic stuff.

 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
As an aside, a couple of months ago, I took my Gretsch to Joe White Guitars in Ash to have it serviced, the first setup it's had, apart from me fannying about with it.

I have to say, it feels like a new guitar. The action is perfect, it's had a fret dress and the intonation is spot on. It positively resonates when played acoustically. The whole service cost around £90 with a new set of premium D'addarios.

I was umming and ahhing about it, after all, the whole guitar only cost me £350 to begin with. However, I can say with confidence that it was money well spent and I'd highly recommend anyone on the fence to have a pro setup on their guitars.
 
+1 Joe White makes a fantastic job.
Last time he helped us a great deal when out local music shop (support your local business and all that bollocks) did a less than satisfactory job on a new(ish) Gibson Explorer and told us there was a problem with the truss rod.

Sent it to Joe White and it came back like new with a full set up report and there was nothing wrong at all with the truss rod.

Can't recommend him highly enough.
 
+1 Joe White makes a fantastic job.
Last time he helped us a great deal when out local music shop (support your local business and all that bollocks) did a less than satisfactory job on a new(ish) Gibson Explorer and told us there was a problem with the truss rod.

Sent it to Joe White and it came back like new with a full set up report and there was nothing wrong at all with the truss rod.

Can't recommend him highly enough.
My local guitar shop that I've mostly used since I was a kid shut down a few weeks ago. Wavelength in Sheffield. Great people and a massive help over the years.

 
As I'm a bit bored and there's no proper work for a while I've spent the last few days going through everything in my studio looking at what I want and what can go. The last 24 hours has been my stomp boxes and the chain and they are all securely in place with zip ties.

First pedal is the EHX Freeze. I love what it does for drones when I'm playing with synths and stuff like that.

Next is a Donner Looper. It's really simple and no effing around.

Next is a TC Electronic Mojo Mojo Overdrive. These things are dirt cheap. £40 or so but it's probably my favourite overdrive pedal because of it's flexibility and it sounds great.

I've left a blank space next because I've got a few delay pedals I like using. Moog Delay is dark and analogue, El Capistan is a tape delay with a few tricks and I have a TC Electronics Flashbakk for digital. I can swap those in and out however I please.

Reverb is a TC electronic Trinity Verb (are you starting to see a pattern here?) I also have the Hall of Fame 2 but I prefer the Trinity on guitars.

All of that goes into a DI and splitter box so the amps get a mono signal into a bass amp and small valve amp and the mixing desk gets either mono or stereo depending on what I fancy.

And that's what I did on Good Friday.
 

Hippohunter

Old-Salt
Having pork sausage chipolatos for fingers my guitar playing is not spectacular. However I do enjoy playing and find it relaxing. During this lock down I am trying to master Wicked Game by Chris Isaac. Some good tutorials on YouTube you just need to trawl through them all until you find one that suits you.
 
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Has anyone ever mentioned this chap?


If you needed to design the ultimate a nerdy looking geek, then Adrian is probaly what you'd come up with.

However, he's actually one of the best of the YouTube channel guitar tutors. He's very skilled, easy to follow and his enthusiasm is infectious. He's right up there with Justin Sandercoe and Tim Pierce.
 
A few years ago when my left wrist seemed like it was made out of weetabix I got a lap steel and this woman taught me more about the technique and the idea than anybody else.
 
The mission today was sorting out the compressor and EQ chain. I've got a DBX 266 which is a pile of crap but I used DBX a lot when I was doing live sound years ago and always managed to get a decent sound out of them.
EQs are Klark Technic EDQ KTs. I have two of them for a stereo output. Great value for the price and they really tighten up the sound.
I've reinstalled a Saffire Pro 40 audio interface because I like the preamps and general size of the thing.
The entire chain looks like madness but it make sense for work flow. A 24 channel mixer feeds into an 18 channel digital rack mount mixer. From there into the comp and then the EQs before hitting the Saffire which then controls the audio on my PC.

Obviously I will be taking it all apart again next week because there is nothing else to do.
 
Fender are stopping the use of ash in their guitars as so many tree are dying in the US so if you have ever fancied an ash bodied strat or tele now would be a good time to buy.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
We watched School of Rock last night and now both the sprogs are interested in getting guitars.

I started them off a few years back with a cheapo half size acoustic but as with most of these things it’s barely playable due to the strings being about 4 inches away from the fingerboard.

Having said that they have both shown some early promise with it.

So time to upgrade.

Looking for 3/4 size electric guitars. Problem is the boy is a lefty so I need to get two. One for him, one for the girl.

There doesn’t seem to be much choice at all for southpaws. The obvious choice when it comes to 3/4 electrics for the small lady is the Squier mini strat, but they don’t do lefty ones

I could go full Jimmy Hendrix and string one upside down but I don’t think it’d make life that easy for him.

Other option is to go full size but he’s only 9.

Any experience of starting kids out on full size guitars?
 

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