A Guitar owner's thread

I used to get Bassist Magazine but way back in 1999.
I loved it, and still have some tabs and articles I took from it.
Problem today is it's so easy just to go online.
 
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Carbon 6

Old-Salt
Guitar magazines - are they worth it?

I’m thinking of getting one for my 18 year old. WH Smith has “Guitarist” and “Total Guitar”. Are they an interesting read or is all I get for the cover price a load of adverts?
Any thoughts?
I would recommend Guitar Player if it's still being published. I was an avid reader of the magazine in the 70's and 80's and one of my favourite articles was 'Tommy Tedesco's Studio Log'. It was very informative and fascinating insight into the career of one of the greatest studio musicians. He even listed his pay and expenses for each session.

After emigrating to Canada in 1989 we became regular visitors to the Artpark Theatre in Lewiston, New York, which is just across the Canadian/US border at Niagara Falls. I always had a look into the orchestra pit when we arrived and one Sunday afternoon I was thrilled to see Tommy Tedesco setting up his music. I can't remember which show was being presented, but I do remember the interval.

During the interval, we had taken a walk outside the theatre and there was Tommy, sitting on a little brick wall eating his lunch. I apologised for interrupting his break and told him how much I had enjoyed his session articles through the years. He was astonished that anyone would recognise him, especially someone from the UK. He was a delight to talk to and our chat only ended when the bell rang to signify the end of the interval.

I'm sorry to ramble on, but it was a highlight in my musical life, due to a subscription to a guitar magazine.


 
Found this from October:

Gibson Loses Its Firebird Guitar Body Shape Trademark in The EU


I've never been fond of Firebirds, Explorers, Flying Vs etc. I'm not fond of anything pointy or asymmetrical. They're too 'Spinal Tap' for my tastes.

Strangely, the Flying V was not intended for thrashers and metalheads (they didn't exist back then). It was conceived for good ol' country boys with the player's picking arm going between the two wings. I don't think that country players ever adopted the guitar in the numbers hoped for by Gibson. It was a bit of a flop to begin with.

I think Dave Davies of the Kinks was the first person I ever saw playing one.
 
I wouldn't have had one given in the 80's or 90's I really couldn't abide the whole pointy guitar thing.

I now have three pointy V's, Dean, Gibson, Jackson and really dig the look of them, maybe it's a retro thing for me.

I find the V the most comfortable shape ever for sitting down with and really like not having all that body to to throw my arm over.

Plus...if you are a lady you don't have to worry about getting your boobies squished with a V while sitting.

That's a bonus I'm told. :)
 
One of the few weirdly shaped guitars that I ever had much time for was the Danelectro Guitarlin.

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They did a baritone and a bass version as well, I think.

I've never owned one, although one of my Strats has lipstick tube pickups.
 




The finished product. Sounds great, plays great and I'm still quite amazed that it does as it's the first one that I have ever put together.

I intended to relic the body but so far I haven't bothered as I know how much work has gone into it.
 
I just put out this new song "Mister Atkins" on Spotify. The lyrics aren't hugely sophisticated but I managed to squeeze in the classic Kipling line about "it's Tommy this and Tommy that..."
 
Cheers Tommy. Been playing for over forty years and have now pretty much got all that I need for my tastes in sound and playability. I got a bit bored a few years ago so I decided to teach myself to play left handed (hence the lefty Strat and LPJ). It's a hell of a challenge and frusrtating but worth the effort. Makes one revisit techniques usually taken for granted.
Hope you enjoy the Behringer MS-101. I know nothing about keyboards so I'll have to have a snoop on Youtube.
I look at the thread off and on as the daughter plays guitar and piano forte and I enjoy listening to her play - she is self taught on both.

The left handed thing is a must for anyone who does something right handed ordinarily (and I do not mean self abuse). I shoot pistol right handed ordinarily and about 10 years ago I was forced to shoot left handed on an advanced course. I was like a spastic on crack. So more or less ever since then I have devoted around a quarter of my range time to shooting left handed - it certainly makes you think, and as you rightly say it makes you revisit techniques that you take for granted and helps sharpen up your ordinary right hand technique.
 

dlrg

LE
I look at the thread off and on as the daughter plays guitar and piano forte and I enjoy listening to her play - she is self taught on both.

The left handed thing is a must for anyone who does something right handed ordinarily (and I do not mean self abuse). I shoot pistol right handed ordinarily and about 10 years ago I was forced to shoot left handed on an advanced course. I was like a spastic on crack. So more or less ever since then I have devoted around a quarter of my range time to shooting left handed - it certainly makes you think, and as you rightly say it makes you revisit techniques that you take for granted and helps sharpen up your ordinary right hand technique.
an excellent example and I couldn't agree more. Like you, I tend to spend about 25% of my time 'left handed'. However much I practice though, the process still does not feel natural. More forced and deliberate than fluid! But I enjoy the challenge,
 
PRS.JPG


I was after a BB King Lucille but they seemed like they were out of stock at most of the usual online guitar shops until March.
I decided I'd go for a baritone guitar instead.
This is a PRS 227 Baritone in night fire. It's a beautiful looking and sounding thing and the first new guitar that hasn't needed any setting up or sorting out.
The humbuckers are coil tapped so you can get this strange sensation of sounding bright like a Telecaster but several notes further down the scale. It also does dark and dirty nicely.

Now the endless quest to figure out which amp and pedals to match with it starts. I currently have it running through a Park bass amp and a Vox Ac 4 valve amp via a DI signal switcher or splitter.
 

Carbon 6

Old-Salt
View attachment 444395

I was after a BB King Lucille but they seemed like they were out of stock at most of the usual online guitar shops until March.
I decided I'd go for a baritone guitar instead.
This is a PRS 227 Baritone in night fire. It's a beautiful looking and sounding thing and the first new guitar that hasn't needed any setting up or sorting out.
The humbuckers are coil tapped so you can get this strange sensation of sounding bright like a Telecaster but several notes further down the scale. It also does dark and dirty nicely.

Now the endless quest to figure out which amp and pedals to match with it starts. I currently have it running through a Park bass amp and a Vox Ac 4 valve amp via a DI signal switcher or splitter.
That's an interesting and well designed guitar; pickup selector and push/pull volume and tone coil taps, I assume. All that's needed. What's the scale length?
 
That's an interesting and well designed guitar; pickup selector and push/pull volume and tone coil taps, I assume. All that's needed. What's the scale length?
27.7” scale length so it's not a massive difference between a normal guitar. The string gauge is a fair bit heavier and I tend to use mediums on all my other guitars. I deffo felt the difference after the first day in my forearms and fingers. It's also my own fault because I've not played that much guitar recently.

I've left it in a B to B tuning but I may drop it down to A to A.

This is a good demo of one of the earlier models.
 

Carbon 6

Old-Salt
27.7” scale length so it's not a massive difference between a normal guitar. The string gauge is a fair bit heavier and I tend to use mediums on all my other guitars. I deffo felt the difference after the first day in my forearms and fingers. It's also my own fault because I've not played that much guitar recently.

I've left it in a B to B tuning but I may drop it down to A to A.

This is a good demo of one of the earlier models.
That sounds great, there's so much more warmth from the lower tuning. I use dropped D or DADGAD most of the time on my acoustics for that reason, but 27.7" would cripple me. Arthritis is a bitch!
 
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That sound sounds great, there's so much more warmth from the lower tuning. I use dropped D or DADGAD most of the time on my acoustics for that reason, but 27.7" would cripple me. Arthritis is a bitch!
My electric lap steel and acoustic that I use for slide are in DADGAD. Once these strings on the baritone start showing their age I'll have a play with some tunings.
 

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