A Falkland Islander’s Wartime Journal - Surviving the Siege By Graham Bound

Grownup_Rafbrat

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Graham was born in the Falklands and in 1982 was living in Port Stanley, working as Editor, Journalist and Publisher of the Penguin News, the local newspaper. As talks between Argentina and Great Britain deteriorated, he started to keep a journal of events, and his feelings about them. He included the feelings of the friends and officials with whom he discussed these matters at the time. He continued keeping the journal through the invasion, the further negotiations at the UN and elsewhere, and the re-taking of the islands. This book is that journal, reproduced without updates for hindsight, and makes interesting and informative reading.


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The language is very simple and direct, and the opinions those you would expect from a young man of 25, but with some insights that one would expect from a more mature person with more life experience. Maybe living as an inhabitant of a somewhat unwanted and neglected Crown Colony made people mature more quickly. He was (and remains) very interested in the politics of his birthplace, and shares the point of view of the Islanders. I hadn’t understood how keen the Thatcher Government had been to hand over the Falklands to Argentina, and how if Argentina had played the long game, the Islands would have transferred peacefully to them, regardless of the opinions of the Islanders.



This is a really good book, an interesting read, and the day-by-day descriptions of events large and small. From the sinking of ships, the shooting down of aeroplanes, to the arrival of a refugee cat and a chicken with chicks at his house, all of life is here, along with sadness at the loss of life and homes, sorrow for the hungry, cold Argentinian conscripts, and fear at the deportations to Argentina of Falklanders considered to be a threat to the new regime. I’d have liked to have seen more about the rebuilding and political changes that happened afterwards but this section seems a little rushed, hence my award of only 4.5 mushroom heads.



The author made his living as a reporter, moving to London and working for the BBC World Service, on which he and his fellow citizens had relied for unbiased news during the period of occupation and relief. A success story and a life so different from what he might have expected had none of it happened.


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I’ve known Graham for a number of years from his time working in London at the Falkland Islands office near New Scotland Yard. A good bloke.
In the back of my mind something is telling me he took over from Sukey Cameron, an old family friend, when she left her post as the FI Govt rep in London.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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He comes across as a genuine chap, someone you'd like to invite to a dinner party!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
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I’ve known Graham for a number of years from his time working in London at the Falkland Islands office near New Scotland Yard. A good bloke.
In the back of my mind something is telling me he took over from Sukey Cameron, an old family friend, when she left her post as the FI Govt rep in London.
The exhibition of his is collection of photos from the time has just finished
FB_IMG_1653746106808.jpg
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Graham was born in the Falklands and in 1982 was living in Port Stanley, working as Editor, Journalist and Publisher of the Penguin News, the local newspaper. As talks between Argentina and Great Britain deteriorated, he started to keep a journal of events, and his feelings about them. He included the feelings of the friends and officials with whom he discussed these matters at the time. He continued keeping the journal through the invasion, the further negotiations at the UN and elsewhere, and the re-taking of the islands. This book is that journal, reproduced without updates for hindsight, and makes interesting and informative reading.


View attachment 665014

The language is very simple and direct, and the opinions those you would expect from a young man of 25, but with some insights that one would expect from a more mature person with more life experience. Maybe living as an inhabitant of a somewhat unwanted and neglected Crown Colony made people mature more quickly. He was (and remains) very interested in the politics of his birthplace, and shares the point of view of the Islanders. I hadn’t understood how keen the Thatcher Government had been to hand over the Falklands to Argentina, and how if Argentina had played the long game, the Islands would have transferred peacefully to them, regardless of the opinions of the Islanders.



This is a really good book, an interesting read, and the day-by-day descriptions of events large and small. From the sinking of ships, the shooting down of aeroplanes, to the arrival of a refugee cat and a chicken with chicks at his house, all of life is here, along with sadness at the loss of life and homes, sorrow for the hungry, cold Argentinian conscripts, and fear at the deportations to Argentina of Falklanders considered to be a threat to the new regime. I’d have liked to have seen more about the rebuilding and political changes that happened afterwards but this section seems a little rushed, hence my award of only 4.5 mushroom heads.



The author made his living as a reporter, moving to London and working for the BBC World Service, on which he and his fellow citizens had relied for unbiased news during the period of occupation and relief. A success story and a life so different from what he might have expected had none of it happened.


Amazon product



His Invasion 1982 is very good.
 

rmn

LE
Graham was born in the Falklands and in 1982 was living in Port Stanley, working as Editor, Journalist and Publisher of the Penguin News, the local newspaper. As talks between Argentina and Great Britain deteriorated, he started to keep a journal of events, and his feelings about them. He included the feelings of the friends and officials with whom he discussed these matters at the time. He continued keeping the journal through the invasion, the further negotiations at the UN and elsewhere, and the re-taking of the islands. This book is that journal, reproduced without updates for hindsight, and makes interesting and informative reading.


View attachment 665014

The language is very simple and direct, and the opinions those you would expect from a young man of 25, but with some insights that one would expect from a more mature person with more life experience. Maybe living as an inhabitant of a somewhat unwanted and neglected Crown Colony made people mature more quickly. He was (and remains) very interested in the politics of his birthplace, and shares the point of view of the Islanders. I hadn’t understood how keen the Thatcher Government had been to hand over the Falklands to Argentina, and how if Argentina had played the long game, the Islands would have transferred peacefully to them, regardless of the opinions of the Islanders.



This is a really good book, an interesting read, and the day-by-day descriptions of events large and small. From the sinking of ships, the shooting down of aeroplanes, to the arrival of a refugee cat and a chicken with chicks at his house, all of life is here, along with sadness at the loss of life and homes, sorrow for the hungry, cold Argentinian conscripts, and fear at the deportations to Argentina of Falklanders considered to be a threat to the new regime. I’d have liked to have seen more about the rebuilding and political changes that happened afterwards but this section seems a little rushed, hence my award of only 4.5 mushroom heads.



The author made his living as a reporter, moving to London and working for the BBC World Service, on which he and his fellow citizens had relied for unbiased news during the period of occupation and relief. A success story and a life so different from what he might have expected had none of it happened.


Amazon product

For an account of the first year following liberation then "Falklands Aftermath " is a good read. Also, Graham Bound wrote a book outline the state of play 30 years post conflict including changes which occurred during that time called "Fortress Falklands ".
 
Graham worked for years in the MOD media and comms branch, doing internal comms - the most unloved function in an unloved directorate :)

Very quiet and modest chap, who put up with a lot of condescending shit from know-it-all children in the press office who had no idea of his background. If I recall correctly, had to give up the job due to a bout of very bad health but subsequently made a good recovery. If he did indeed take over from Sukey, then wonderful news.
 
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