Paint & Tools A decent glue

#1
don't normally do a plug for a particular brand, but I've just discovered this glue, I went into B&Q for some Serious glue, but they don't stock it anymore, so I took a chance on this unibond 100% power glue. This was all about bonding the glass panels together that make up the display cases I'm always banging on about. Tried Gorilla, and it foams out of the join and looks rubbish. ok for unseen joins, but this unibond, what a find!
 

smeg-head

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#2
don't normally do a plug for a particular brand, but I've just discovered this glue, I went into B&Q for some Serious glue, but they don't stock it anymore, so I took a chance on this unibond 100% power glue. This was all about bonding the glass panels together that make up the display cases I'm always banging on about. Tried Gorilla, and it foams out of the join and looks rubbish. ok for unseen joins, but this unibond, what a find!
Good work that man. I agree with everything you say. Gorilla has it's uses but when it comes to a clear-drying glue, I always go for Unibond. There used to be a superglue version for glass but it didn't dry clear and finally disappeared from the market. Being a chippy by trade, I tend to use a lot of Unibond's products and have not found them wanting.
 
#3
look at that for a invisible glue join.



The main points of this glue are.
a. long dry/harden off time, max harden off after 24 hrs
b. needs half hour to set, so lots of time to check angles ect
c. give a clear finish
d. needs a initial pressure join with tape or weight.

Soon have a cover over my WW1 Mk4.

edit to add, forgot, you lightly moisten the join before applying the glue.
 
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#4
Good work that man. I agree with everything you say. Gorilla has it's uses but when it comes to a clear-drying glue, I always go for Unibond. There used to be a superglue version for glass but it didn't dry clear and finally disappeared from the market. Being a chippy by trade, I tend to use a lot of Unibond's products and have not found them wanting.
a Chippy! well I never, you learn a little more about each other bit by bit. So how are you finding grain these days, Met a Chippy the other week who was telling me how terrible it is in the trade because the modern timbers are all terrible bad grain.
 

smeg-head

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#7
a Chippy! well I never, you learn a little more about each other bit by bit. So how are you finding grain these days, Met a Chippy the other week who was telling me how terrible it is in the trade because the modern timbers are all terrible bad grain.
Modern timber is rubbish because nine times out of ten, the timber is not seasoned despite any label that may be attached to it. To be properly seasoned, the water content of any timber should be below 12%. The reason chippies wear safety glasses is to stop high pressure liquid hitting them in the eyes from nailing timber! As for timber lengths, if you find a straight piece of timber, take a photo of it!
 

Joshua Slocum

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#8
Modern timber is rubbish because nine times out of ten, the timber is not seasoned despite any label that may be attached to it. To be properly seasoned, the water content of any timber should be below 12%. The reason chippies wear safety glasses is to stop high pressure liquid hitting them in the eyes from nailing timber! As for timber lengths, if you find a straight piece of timber, take a photo of it!
if you ever find a length without splits and knots let me know !!
 
#9
Meh !! That's not a glass display case.. :)

THIS IS A GLASS DISPLAY CASE..

Note the weight 550lb's (less the crate weight).
1544034813240.png

Off the truck, out of the crate onto a 4 wheel dolly, across 100' feet of parking lot, through 2 sets of glass doors, thru the lobby, tilted to get into a 'small' elevator, out of that then laid down until we got this ready and fitted onto the base: A Porsche sculpted entirely out of tires.
1544035149823.png

Took 6 of us to lift the Glass cover gently, gingerly, crap pantingly, over the model and onto the cabinet.
1544034944115.png

An install we did for Taylor Group at the main Porsche Dealer in Toronto.


(PS: The BASE wasn't fffffffffing light either :) )

BTW @SPROCKET321 The case was glued using Loctite UV adhesive: Loctite UK
Nice job on your display as well.
 
#10
Modern timber is rubbish because nine times out of ten, the timber is not seasoned despite any label that may be attached to it. To be properly seasoned, the water content of any timber should be below 12%. The reason chippies wear safety glasses is to stop high pressure liquid hitting them in the eyes from nailing timber! As for timber lengths, if you find a straight piece of timber, take a photo of it!
in George Sturts old book the wheelwright shop, he writes about the forward planning involved in storing enough wood to let it season over years not months, they would find limbs of trees the right shape to suit part of a cart or wagon, proper craftsmen.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
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#11
its all kiln dried rubbish
my old employer had a joiners shop, one of the chippies asked me to have a look at an old building firm near me that was closing down and ask if I could buy any timber
did a deal with the labourers beer money
ended up with a flatbed load of ancient dust covered timber for him
turned out they used to make coffins, as did most small builders and this stuff had been there for at least 60 years
he banged it through the planer in the mill and lovely it was too
all used for furniture restoration
 
#12
Has to be Amazonian hardwood..... after two months of being dragged out of the jungle by mules, two months at the dockside in tropical heat and six months on a freighter, it's lovely*.



*Not too lovely for the rainforest though....
 
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Joshua Slocum

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#13
Has to be Amazonian hardwood..... after two months of being dragged out of the jungle by mules, two months at the dockside in tropical heat and six months on a freighter, it's lovely*.



Not too lovely for the rainforest though....
there was a lot of Ash, some lovely Elm planking, some mahogony
and 10 planks of Iroko which is very very heavy ( i lifted it in the truck)
I used the cast off elm to clad my shed
 

smeg-head

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#14
its all kiln dried rubbish
my old employer had a joiners shop, one of the chippies asked me to have a look at an old building firm near me that was closing down and ask if I could buy any timber
did a deal with the labourers beer money
ended up with a flatbed load of ancient dust covered timber for him
turned out they used to make coffins, as did most small builders and this stuff had been there for at least 60 years
he banged it through the planer in the mill and lovely it was too
all used for furniture restoration
Kiln dried timber is ok if you want timber for turning or decorative inlay and veneering. It is of no use whatsoever for construction work as it generally cause the wood to shake (split) or bend. An example of this can be found in any store where staff wear orange aprons (no names). Their timber would be perfect for making bi-plane propellers out of as it already has a minimum of two lateral twists! The problem most timber suppliers face is one of storage. Once the timber has been seasoned, the worst thing to do with it is store it outside, exposed to the elements or stored under a plastic sheet/tarp. All that happens then is the wood cells which have been flattened during drying, absorb the moisture in the atmosphere and swell, crack and warp.
 
#15
I learnt a tip on a youtube modelling channel called MARTIES MATCHBOX MAKOVERS, an Aussie guy who makes a series of very watchable 20 minute videos, his tip was to sprinkle baking soda over wet superglue join. The fine white powder soaks up the excess superglue and forms an instant strong bond. Particularly for PE to PE or cast metal to resin. Here I'm using it to bond a cast metal torpedo nose onto a resin Torpedo body, made a very strong and tidy joint.
 
#16
Good work that man. I agree with everything you say. Gorilla has it's uses but when it comes to a clear-drying glue, I always go for Unibond. There used to be a superglue version for glass but it didn't dry clear and finally disappeared from the market. Being a chippy by trade, I tend to use a lot of Unibond's products and have not found them wanting.
Have you tried No More Nails?
 

smeg-head

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#17

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