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Builds A-1 AD-6 Douglas Skyraider in 1/32nd scale

Gloss or not, they were minging

IMG_8089.jpg


Question I've got is what to do about the weathering?
 

aardvark64

War Hero
Factory fresh, normal wear and tear, or hard usage?
 

aardvark64

War Hero

aardvark64

War Hero
Have a look at the Spad in the piccie above - you can see what I need to do
Yes, I was wondering if there was a white wisp equivalent to the rainbow effect? Just a thought.
 
Challenge is the grey/white oil stains - not worked out how to do them yet
I'd go light weathering, enough to show it's cared for by the maintenance crew, but still showing signs of long flights in harsh conditions of the Pacific, salt staining, ground in oil stains, paint fade due to UV. Weathering adds so much character to a static model, shows the viewer what it was used for. And it's our art form. Gun smoke, firearms discharge residue as if it's been on the firing range. Of course it's your model, you must do what you feel is right.
 
I'd go light weathering, enough to show it's cared for by the maintenance crew, but still showing signs of long flights in harsh conditions of the Pacific, salt staining, ground in oil stains, paint fade due to UV. Weathering adds so much character to a static model, shows the viewer what it was used for. And it's our art form. Gun smoke, firearms discharge residue as if it's been on the firing range. Of course it's your model, you must do what you feel is right.
I’ve looked at a lot (and I mean a lot) of photos of Spads - as you’d expect there are not tons of colour photos from the 50s but you get enough of a feel from the b&w ones. They didn’t seem to have had the hammering that that WW2 planes had with the salt. I’ve seen some worn, but not anything like the dauntless I did last year. The majority of it is from oil that got everywhere
 
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NSP

LE
I’ve looked at a lot (and I mean a lot) of photos of Spads - as you’d expect there are not tons of colour photos from the 50s but you get enough of a feel from the b&w ones. They didn’t seem to have had the hammering that that WW2 planes had with the salt. I’ve seen some worn, but not anything like the dauntless I did last year. The majority of it is from oil that got everywhere
During Global Unpleasantness Part Deux weren't carriers smaller, lower to the water and narrower than Korean War and Vietnam era flattops - i.e. during weather there'd be more water reaching the flight deck over the bow on WWII carriers)?

Also, looking at photos during WWII operations the aircraft seem to be stored on deck (tempo of operations, need to scramble, etc...??) more than down below whereas Korea/Vietnam not so much - experience indicating low chance of air attack?? Also, after the war carrier tactics seem to have developed into dedicated fighter and attack aircraft, rather than using a jack-of-all-trades such as the Corsair as a fighter and a ground support aircraft. Thus, no need to have types like the Skyraider on deck until it was time to launch on a planned sortie as you'd never scramble them for air defence/interception.
 

ABNredleg

War Hero
During Global Unpleasantness Part Deux weren't carriers smaller, lower to the water and narrower than Korean War and Vietnam era flattops - i.e. during weather there'd be more water reaching the flight deck over the bow on WWII carriers)?

Also, looking at photos during WWII operations the aircraft seem to be stored on deck (tempo of operations, need to scramble, etc...??) more than down below whereas Korea/Vietnam not so much - experience indicating low chance of air attack?? Also, after the war carrier tactics seem to have developed into dedicated fighter and attack aircraft, rather than using a jack-of-all-trades such as the Corsair as a fighter and a ground support aircraft. Thus, no need to have types like the Skyraider on deck until it was time to launch on a planned sortie as you'd never scramble them for air defence/interception.
All Korean War carriers were Essex class so same as WWII. Vietnam was a mix of modified Essex and the new super carriers.
 
During Global Unpleasantness Part Deux weren't carriers smaller, lower to the water and narrower than Korean War and Vietnam era flattops - i.e. during weather there'd be more water reaching the flight deck over the bow on WWII carriers)?

Also, looking at photos during WWII operations the aircraft seem to be stored on deck (tempo of operations, need to scramble, etc...??) more than down below whereas Korea/Vietnam not so much - experience indicating low chance of air attack?? Also, after the war carrier tactics seem to have developed into dedicated fighter and attack aircraft, rather than using a jack-of-all-trades such as the Corsair as a fighter and a ground support aircraft. Thus, no need to have types like the Skyraider on deck until it was time to launch on a planned sortie as you'd never scramble them for air defence/interception.
All Korean War carriers were Essex class so same as WWII. Vietnam was a mix of modified Essex and the new super carriers.
@ABNredleg is quite correct.

Maybe the paint was different? Who knows - they just didnt get the hammer the WW2 planes seemed to have got.
 
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