Builds A-1 AD-6 Douglas Skyraider in 1/32nd scale

I expect they are to do with carrier ops, perhaps a visual indication of something (full revs? Pilot ready?) to the catapult operator.
ive now found orange and silver as well as red and green. that said it could be orange and green.............
 

Boxy

GCM
ive now found orange and silver as well as red and green. that said it could be orange and green.............
So this will never be finished until you find a definitive answer?
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
Another picture because I want to see the wokka.


Position/Navigation/Running Lights

These are the standard red (left wingtip), green (right wingtip), white (tail) lights. On some late 1940s and 1950s Navy airplanes, there is a separate orange tail light. This appears to be a holdover from a pre-World War II CAA (the forerunner of the FAA) requirement for separate orange and white tail lights that would flash alternately (white-orange-white- orange) to improve visibility at night. Those on the AD Skyraider were on both sides of the fin and viewable from the rear.

 
Si, I’m sorry if this is causing you grief but given your quest for accuracy I thought it was worth a mention.

“Nav” lights have nothing to do with navigating but are actually an “aid to navigation” and are a direct hand-over from the early days of aviation when all things nautical were adopted - like port and starboard I suppose.

To gain a commercial licence pilots have to take a “Lights” exam - pass rate 100% - something along the lines of “You are heading 340 degree, you observe a red and white light in your two o’clock position moving left to right. Will that aircraft pass in front or behind you?”

Of cours, the one to really avoid is a red and green in your twelve o’clock!


83124B39-5B98-4EBB-83D5-14FF49A34D19.png
 
Hmm. Mine is from 1964. I’ve posted on the Spad forum. I suspect we may be orange and white
 
Another picture because I want to see the wokka.


Position/Navigation/Running Lights

These are the standard red (left wingtip), green (right wingtip), white (tail) lights. On some late 1940s and 1950s Navy airplanes, there is a separate orange tail light. This appears to be a holdover from a pre-World War II CAA (the forerunner of the FAA) requirement for separate orange and white tail lights that would flash alternately (white-orange-white- orange) to improve visibility at night. Those on the AD Skyraider were on both sides of the fin and viewable from the rear.

still got the Korean one to finish yet... I think that may be wings down

C5D46FF1-63B4-46E9-92C7-CEF47BC9C5AE.jpeg
 

aardvark64

War Hero
Couple of nice shots of the Korean livery Spad and one or two for @NSP to colour?

8A626E09-7E2E-402F-A78E-F46B122B1169.jpeg

C658C8F3-9CE5-4A86-88E7-322FD4FB5C03.jpeg

EB738C1C-BD29-4D7C-8C91-B94B7FC431E9.jpeg

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D3C67476-48F5-4BF6-B777-3C5BFB4B41EE.jpeg
 

4(T)

LE
Si, I’m sorry if this is causing you grief but given your quest for accuracy I thought it was worth a mention.

“Nav” lights have nothing to do with navigating but are actually an “aid to navigation” and are a direct hand-over from the early days of aviation when all things nautical were adopted - like port and starboard I suppose.

To gain a commercial licence pilots have to take a “Lights” exam - pass rate 100% - something along the lines of “You are heading 340 degree, you observe a red and white light in your two o’clock position moving left to right. Will that aircraft pass in front or behind you?”

Of cours, the one to really avoid is a red and green in your twelve o’clock!


View attachment 495646

Apparently the ones in question aren't navigation lights.

They are IFF identification lights. WW2 and 50s US aircraft had coloured lights located at various positions on the wings, fuselage and tail, and these were used in various combinations and modes in order to ID the aircraft at night.
 
Apparently the ones in question aren't navigation lights.

They are IFF identification lights. WW2 and 50s US aircraft had coloured lights located at various positions on the wings, fuselage and tail, and these were used in various combinations and modes in order to ID the aircraft at night.
so red/orange and green, which I’ve seen on a number of Spads is correct
 
Well I’m committed now........

ACD087C9-11E3-4B73-BFBF-B65D07EE1EEA.jpeg


happy days

F8703B2A-2203-4131-B65A-8CB930A10C0A.jpeg
 
Now it’s really funny but if you look at the one above and look at this one you probably cant see much difference

A3C6C047-08C7-46AF-85E1-D21CAC78514A.jpeg

but there is probably three hours work gone in separating the two models. It’s one of the reasons modelling is so good for people with daemons - it’s the escape from them for three hours and the time is gone in a second.

Anyway. Air brakes open or closed? Expose the guns and ammo boxes? Some decisions to make right about now
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Now it’s really funny but if you look at the one above and look at this one you probably cant see much difference

View attachment 495786
but there is probably three hours work gone in separating the two models. It’s one of the reasons modelling is so good for people with daemons - it’s the escape from them for three hours and the time is gone in a second.

Anyway. Air brakes open or closed? Expose the guns and ammo boxes? Some decisions to make right about now
Would the airbrakes naturally be open on the ground? Guns and ammo boxes, yes.
 
Would the airbrakes naturally be open on the ground? Guns and ammo boxes, yes.
No they’d be closed. Ammo boxes open yes but probably only when the guns are being loaded with link
 
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