999 stuff

Mrs Slocombe

Old-Salt
When you call 999/112, the operator you get through to works for BT. They ask you which service you require.
Assuming you say police, they'll try and put you through to your local force. If there's no answer, they'll keep trying for (IIRC) 20 seconds, which feels like a long time. At that point, if the pigs haven't answered, there's only one thing they can do, and that's put you through to a neighbouring force.

When that force hears the story and realise it's not on their patch, they'll log an incident but they won't bother sending one of their own panda cars.

Now this should practically never happen.

I used to maintain the telephony software in control rooms. One day I was at a certain force, and the control room supervisor came up to me and said the neighbouring force had contacted her (via a dedicated phone line) to say they were getting calls passed to them from BT, and was there something going on? She had enough people on shift, and wondered whether our software had screwed up.
Since I hadn't a clue, I grabbed my colleague, who immediately checked everything and could find nothing wrong.
We found out the reason a few days later. They simply hadn't got enough bums on seats - too many people were logged out of the system - i.e. gone for a fag, making a cup of tea and so on.
 
When you call 999/112, the operator you get through to works for BT. They ask you which service you require.
Assuming you say police, they'll try and put you through to your local force. If there's no answer, they'll keep trying for (IIRC) 20 seconds, which feels like a long time. At that point, if the pigs haven't answered, there's only one thing they can do, and that's put you through to a neighbouring force.

When that force hears the story and realise it's not on their patch, they'll log an incident but they won't bother sending one of their own panda cars.

Now this should practically never happen.

I used to maintain the telephony software in control rooms. One day I was at a certain force, and the control room supervisor came up to me and said the neighbouring force had contacted her (via a dedicated phone line) to say they were getting calls passed to them from BT, and was there something going on? She had enough people on shift, and wondered whether our software had screwed up.
Since I hadn't a clue, I grabbed my colleague, who immediately checked everything and could find nothing wrong.
We found out the reason a few days later. They simply hadn't got enough bums on seats - too many people were logged out of the system - i.e. gone for a fag, making a cup of tea and so on.
Which force?
 
I think he’s saying it’s a major flaw in YOUR command and briefing structure. Summat like this:

a) Kid finds mortar round in the woods. Tells Dad.
b) Dad goes and looks at it and goes “fcuk, that’s a bomb”.
c) Dad calls 999. Plod sent to look at it.
d) “Fcuk, that’s a bomb”.
e) Plod call EOD out.
f) Happens to be @dingerr on the bomb truck.
g) Dingerr wants to know what the script is, and to get the place cordoned off before he gets there.
h) Unless the initial report to EOD tasking has the right number to call for the bloke on the ground with shiny epaulettes, who does he speak to while en-route? Provision of that number must be with Plod.
A mortar round in the woods, would be dealt with by the PC that attends the incident. A quick phot of the item sent to the control room and onto EOD, and then step back. The shift Sgt might attend, if you needed more staff for a cordon.

Obviously different if a suspected IED in a shopping centre etc, then it would still be commanded by an Insp. If an explosion, then a Force command structure.
 
In that scenario the JSEODOC would not deal with HMCG alone, they do not have the legal authority to effect cordon & evacuation.

There are specific instruction for dealing with explosive incidents, some police forces are very good, some are bloody awful and through incompetence put the public at risk.
Stop being a knob dingerr.
This thread is not about proving points.
Or trying to.
You are being deliberatly obtuse and it is not becoming of you.
 
One of the things they will want to know is a contact number for the copper in charge of the site. Dingerr gets to put his newspaper down, and crashes out. On the way there, Dingerr wants to get informed of WTFIGO, so calls the contact number.
..only to phone the PC's mobile number, hence triggering the device :) ;)
 
When you call 999/112, the operator you get through to works for BT. They ask you which service you require.
Assuming you say police, they'll try and put you through to your local force. If there's no answer, they'll keep trying for (IIRC) 20 seconds, which feels like a long time. At that point, if the pigs haven't answered, there's only one thing they can do, and that's put you through to a neighbouring force.

When that force hears the story and realise it's not on their patch, they'll log an incident but they won't bother sending one of their own panda cars.

Now this should practically never happen.

I used to maintain the telephony software in control rooms. One day I was at a certain force, and the control room supervisor came up to me and said the neighbouring force had contacted her (via a dedicated phone line) to say they were getting calls passed to them from BT, and was there something going on? She had enough people on shift, and wondered whether our software had screwed up.
Since I hadn't a clue, I grabbed my colleague, who immediately checked everything and could find nothing wrong.
We found out the reason a few days later. They simply hadn't got enough bums on seats - too many people were logged out of the system - i.e. gone for a fag, making a cup of tea and so on.
We get notified if neighbouring forces are high on 9s and some will be diverted.

They are dealt with exactly as any other 9s.. Our neighbouring force uses same software so its a simple transaction. Were I to get a misdirected 9s call from ...wherever...I'd take the initaildetails and phone it hrough myself.
 
We get notified if neighbouring forces are high on 9s and some will be diverted.

They are dealt with exactly as any other 9s.. Our neighbouring force uses same software so its a simple transaction. Were I to get a misdirected 9s call from ...wherever...I'd take the initaildetails and phone it hrough myself.
If its a 101 type call/enquiry and it does not relate to our force...they wil be punted back toi 101 and select correct force.
If its an emergency..and I deem it such.. I will take details and call relevent force by emergency line if its not one I can directly rtransfer log to.
The general public do not realise different forces cannot see each other's info.
It is ridiculous in this day and age. It is how it is though.
 
Best way to describe this is to post your scenario - and I will try and say how I / my force would deal with it, and what would be happening in the background.
Do you have a 'triage' type system for a scenario where there are a lot of incidents in your area. And, do you have a system for if/when you are fully committed to hand over incidents to a neighbouring force?
 
Do you have a 'triage' type system for a scenario where there are a lot of incidents in your area. And, do you have a system for if/when you are fully committed to hand over incidents to a neighbouring force?
If there is an incident that escalates - t will be passed up the line Silver-Gold command etc.
Same as in the mob. Any incidents that are "linked" will be linked as such on the log.

If a bomb goes off..there will be mul;tiple calls initially, one will be selected ast master log and all stuff done off that.
If you phone me and say "bloke just fired a gun on my street"...If I get your location...I will see all recent logged activities within half mile of there .
Neighbouring force often has to handover 9's when they cant cope. I'll take a 999 call for somewhere in neighbouring force. If it is one I can direct transfer to all is well but...Bloke on bridge about to jump / and im the only person on phone to him...it gets complicated.

Yes..I've had that situation.
 
..only to phone the PC's mobile number, hence triggering the device :) ;)
You know full well that PCs wont answer their work mobile or airwave..
I dont blame them either. Often have to contact their supervising PS in lieu.
WHich is a bit shit and sounds jack as **** but...if a safeguarging officer has nt made contact, and I can see repeated requests....
Do you use niche?
 
In that scenario the JSEODOC would not deal with HMCG alone, they do not have the legal authority to effect cordon & evacuation.

There are specific instruction for dealing with explosive incidents, some police forces are very good, some are bloody awful and through incompetence put the public at risk.
I’m sure all correct protocols were followed. I was only listening to it with half an ear while dealing with my own share of sh1te
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
So with your inside knowledge and power, have you thought about how we could put this to proper use?

Let’s say an acquaintance of mine wanted to do over a bank, could you make it so all the local plod were busy dealing with a pretend incident on the other side of the county?

Just a thought.
 

TamH70

MIA
In that scenario the JSEODOC would not deal with HMCG alone, they do not have the legal authority to effect cordon & evacuation.

There are specific instruction for dealing with explosive incidents, some police forces are very good, some are bloody awful and through incompetence put the public at risk.
I saw an episode of Police Interceptors based in Cumbria, where Joe Public, Member of, Thick as Pigshit Variety, had brought in a tin containing a mortar bomb. All proceeded down the line, steady escalation of evacuation and running about as the perceived threat mounted up - having a BFO British Oxygen (or some other company that deals with bulk explodey gases, it's been a while since I've seen the episode) next to the police station was a bit of a bummer, considering their massive tanks of explodey gases couldn't be removed - and setting up an exclusion zone as per procedure - until the EOD guys got there in their big heavy wagon, and park it up. The EOD guys go into the police station, assess the situation to their usual professional standard (not piss-taking - yet. That comes soon enough and it's nothing to do with how well they performed their task) and find out that the mortar bomb is in fact a wooden training mock-up and things return to normal. Well, almost.

Remember the EOD guys' big heavy wagon? Guess where they parked it? On hard standing? Nope. On a car park?
Nope. On the road? MMnope.

On what looked like a football pitch? A grass football pitch, read as muddy field with some grass on top of it?

Yep.

Shifting an EOD guys' big heavy wagon when it's up to its oxters in a football pitch while a Landaner voice over artist is taking the Michael out of you isn't an easy job. No wonder that later repeats of the episode cut that bit out.
 
Is there a polite way of saying "I want to nail your wife" on arse?!!

Gen question.
 
As a HM Prison Service Control Room/Radio Operator and Prison Fire Officer at a CAT C Training Establishment in deepest rural East Anglia, my favorite (or not) 999 call to the Fire Service was FIRE 'MAKE PUMPS SIX'. (Numerous times for real and the odd exercises). That message used to make my counterpart in the Fire Service Control Room sit up, take notice & sweat a bit especially on nights.

6 X PUMPS i.e 30 plus Firefighters plus an Assistant Divisional Officer and maybe an Divisional Officer in attendance, then there was the Ambulance Service and Police in attendance and the HMP Tornado Teams following on.

I used to sweat a bit (until relieved to go and do my Trumpton Duties) as I used to be nominated Duty Tea Boy!!!! Try finding around 50 mugs, tea bags, milk etc at zero early hours to make the brews with only a few minutes notice. The sound of sirens in the background with the Emergency Services arriving and banging on the gate and the kettle is still not boiled, man you had to be there.
 
Stop being a knob dingerr.
This thread is not about proving points.
Or trying to.
You are being deliberatly obtuse and it is not becoming of you.
Im not proving points, I’m providing information. You said yourself you haven’t dealt with an EOD incident, so how can you say otherwise?
 
So with your inside knowledge and power, have you thought about how we could put this to proper use?

Let’s say an acquaintance of mine wanted to do over a bank, could you make it so all the local plod were busy dealing with a pretend incident on the other side of the county?

Just a thought.
As PIRA have done many times, they also used a similar tactic if they wanted to move kit across Belfast, they would call in vehicles as suspect, some would be hoax calls, some would be real devices. This required remote rapid disruption, in the early days this was done by smashing a window and dropping a maxi candle into the car.

1585867717395.png

the maxi candle was explosive surrounded by fire suppressant powder, upon detonation a overpressure is caused in the confines of the vehicle (hopefully) disrupting any TPUs and/or links to the main charge.
 
As a HM Prison Service Control Room/Radio Operator and Prison Fire Officer at a CAT C Training Establishment in deepest rural East Anglia, my favorite (or not) 999 call to the Fire Service was FIRE 'MAKE PUMPS SIX'. (Numerous times for real and the odd exercises). That message used to make my counterpart in the Fire Service Control Room sit up, take notice & sweat a bit especially on nights.

6 X PUMPS i.e 30 plus Firefighters plus an Assistant Divisional Officer and maybe an Divisional Officer in attendance, then there was the Ambulance Service and Police in attendance and the HMP Tornado Teams following on.

I used to sweat a bit (until relieved to go and do my Trumpton Duties) as I used to be nominated Duty Tea Boy!!!! Try finding around 50 mugs, tea bags, milk etc at zero early hours to make the brews with only a few minutes notice. The sound of sirens in the background with the Emergency Services arriving and banging on the gate and the kettle is still not boiled, man you had to be there.
We have a gennie, kettle, brew kit and 1600 litres on my pump for occasions like this!
 
Remember the EOD guys' big heavy wagon? Guess where they parked it? On hard standing? Nope. On a car park?
Nope. On the road? MMnope.

On what looked like a football pitch? A grass football pitch, read as muddy field with some grass on top of it?

Yep.

Shifting an EOD guys' big heavy wagon when it's up to its oxters in a football pitch while a Landaner voice over artist is taking the Michael out of you isn't an easy job. No wonder that later repeats of the episode cut that bit out.
I don’t get it, it’s clearly an off road vehicle :grin:

1585868287327.jpeg
 

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