999 stuff

A.N.Other

Old-Salt
What about reports of say a stranded/injured mountain climber? Who calls out the MRT or SAR Helo? Indeed who makes the call whether it’s a helo from the off, or send the MRT first? I know the crabs used to run a national rescue control center in Kinloss, but I assume that went away with the Nimrods, or even before.
MR can be called out by the Police or Ambulance. They open a log in a system called SARCALL, and a SMS is sent to the MR coordinators in the MRT covering the location of the the incident. The coordinator calls the contact number in the SMS for further information (ambulance control, police search manager/POLSA or control room). From there they decide the appropriate response.

Casualty at a known location:
The team is called out and directed to an RV, which is chosen by the MR coordinator. This may be an "immediate" response (blue lights) if paramedics are not with the casualty, or standard (no blue lights) if the casualty is not critical or paramedics are with the casualty.

What resources are sent is dependent on what's available, any other ongoing incident and the particulars of the casualty and location. The casualty location would be confirmed using PhoneFinder (a message is sent to a mobile phone at the casualty site. Opening a link in the message sends the grid figures to SARCALL and is pinpointed in a map in SARCALL.). Information is handed over to the MR on scene commander and they run the incident with the coordinator is support.

If there is an immediate risk to life or the casualty is in a very remote location we may request a helicopter through the police control room. This can be NPAS (police), air ambulance or coastguard. This is to get aid to the casualty ASAP or to assist in transporting MR members to the cas location.

MR is often stood down enroute to the RV if the heli gets there first and has collected the casualty. We do not stand down if the heli is enroute to the casualty. The heli may be retasked, run it to bad weather, have mechanical issues or decided the casualty is not a priority for heli evacuation. MR would still be needed to transport the casualty to the road and hand over to a land ambulance. We do not transport the casualty to hospital.

Ambulance control sometimes call MR when the casualty could be handled by a land ambulance but we push back as that's not our role.

Casualty location unknown / missing person:
Similar to a known casualty location callout. Information requested from the calling authority and a response decided on. Major difference is a more complex/considered plan for the response. The POLSA will have information on the MISPER (age, clothing, physical & mental health, police markers for violence/weapons, etc), terrain/area (open ground, urban, water hazards, mountainous, mine shafts - well, I am in Wales!), reason for going missing (do they want to be found, are they hiding, dementia, lost child, suicidal), locations in the area important to them (favourite camping spot, parents graves, past residencies), what they were doing when they went missing (Hill walking with a route card, absconded from a mental health unit, playing with friends, caught fiddling with his daughter and off to top himself) and so on.

The plan will include initial search areas, one or more RVs, initial tasking of resources, request for NPAS heli and thermal imaging, additional bodies from other teams, MR search dogs, police enquiries at addresses, etc. The MR coordinator issues taskings to resources as needed. As team members are volunteers with day jobs there can be a lot of juggling of individuals and timing. Response vehicles need to be picked up, along with specialise equipment, such as SRT/water search gear. Control is passed over to an MR search manager when control is set up at the RV.

All callouts where the location is not known should come via the police. If the casualty location is not known then we should be called out by the police.

There is still a national coastguard heli coordination centre. I think the ARCC is in Kinloss, as Bristow took over the heli service after RAF and navy helis were stood down a few years ago.
 

A.N.Other

Old-Salt
@supermatelot
Does your force use the "What Three Word" location system? Do your officers or other emergency workers you come across understand it/use it?
W3 is used by MR as well as a growing number of police forces. Its included in the callout and search management systems we use. Its OK but we have had a few issues. Sometimes similar sounding words get confused or words can be misspelt. We still prefer OS grid coordinates as we have been sent to the wrong places on a couple of occasions. It causes delay and confusion.
 
Always remember one call over the radio from Scotland Yard Information Room.
Fortunately not to our RT car.

"Male berserk with a hammer, sounds of women and children screaming"
I once heard the call to town officers

"Reports of a man with a sword - description 6 foot tall, naked except for a Viking helmet - No further description"
The reply came in measured tones "That's probably enough to be going on with"
 
I drive for NHS Blood and Transplant Service, we have three sirens plus the Bullhorn, there is a particular siren for long range(to give people the heads up that somethings afoot), a siren that we use approaching/going through traffic and a continental type one(which I've no idea what it's used for), I especially like using the bullhorn when I'm about 10 yards away from somebody's arse and they are ignoring you/haven't seen you.

ETA The very first thing you/I do before putting the siren on is make sure the windows are up because those fookers are very, very loud.
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Not if you’ve tasked me, I need to speak to the incident commander.
So initially then you would have phoned 999. You woudn't have been provided a list of quick dial numbers for the on shift ACC or Superintendent.
 
@supermatelot
Does your force use the "What Three Word" location system? Do your officers or other emergency workers you come across understand it/use it?
Yes we do, as mentioned up thread. We can also text it to people whilst on phone to them.
Not ideal but useful as last resort...middle of nowhere scenario. If I know a general area I can send to relevent district and officers will know where it is at, usually.

Example..look on google Earth for RAF Harrowbeer. (Not my force area anyway). If you got mugged up there it probably would not show on mapping system. I'd just put nearest known place into a certain box and from that - I know which district deals with that area. In that situation I'd put some pub at Yelverton as Locus and annotate "airfield near locus"
 
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So initially then you would have phoned 999. You woudn't have been provided a list of quick dial numbers for the on shift ACC or Superintendent.
No. I’m the EOD operator. You would task me through the Joint Service EOD operations centre on 01235 513360 / 1 / 2.

As the responding operator I need someone to speak to whilst I’m on route.
 
Every day a school day, even when I'm working from home apparently. Very informative gents, thanks :)
 
No. I’m the EOD operator. You would task me through the Joint Service EOD operations centre on 01235 513360 / 1 / 2.

As the responding operator I need someone to speak to whilst I’m on route.
And someone far higher up than I, at Gold command would have already established lines of comms or designated them.
I've never actually dealt with an EOD incident so I acnnot honestly state what I know/think would happen. I do however know the various levels things get progressed to and things escalate accordingly.

If you, as a responding operator, found yourself having to diall 999 for info on whatever you were responding to then that is a major flaw in your command and briefing structure.

Further example though"Major incident at X location"
If multiple calls were expected, log woud be broadcast and, considering people have different perceptions of location..can take the call and know shit is going down at wherever.
Often, multiple logs are created as different people phone in and report same thing from their point of view.
These are quickly identified and the "duplicates" linked into and then binned.
 
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And someone far higher up than I, at Gold command would have already established lines of comms or designated them.
I've never actually dealt with an EOD incident so I acnnot honestly state what I know/think would happen. I do however know the various levels things get progressed to and things escalate accordingly.

If you, as a responding operator, found yourself having to diall 999 for info on whatever you were responding to then that is a major flaw in your command and briefing structure.
I think he’s saying it’s a major flaw in YOUR command and briefing structure. Summat like this:

a) Kid finds mortar round in the woods. Tells Dad.
b) Dad goes and looks at it and goes “fcuk, that’s a bomb”.
c) Dad calls 999. Plod sent to look at it.
d) “Fcuk, that’s a bomb”.
e) Plod call EOD out.
f) Happens to be @dingerr on the bomb truck.
g) Dingerr wants to know what the script is, and to get the place cordoned off before he gets there.
h) Unless the initial report to EOD tasking has the right number to call for the bloke on the ground with shiny epaulettes, who does he speak to while en-route? Provision of that number must be with Plod.
 
I drive for NHS Blood and Transplant Service, we have three sirens plus the Bullhorn, there is a particular siren for long range(to give people the heads up that somethings afoot), a siren that we use approaching/going through traffic and a continental type one(which I've no idea what it's used for), I especially like using the bullhorn when I'm about 10 yards away from somebody's arse and they are ignoring you/haven't seen you.

ETA The very first thing you/I do before putting the siren on is make sure the windows are up because those fookers are very, very loud.
I don’t know if they still do, but I was in an Avon and Somerset Constabulary vehicle once (don’t ask), and saw the light/siren control panel had buttons marked Day Woo Woo, Night Woo Woo, Day Wail and Night Wail.
 

potter

Old-Salt
Example..look on google Earth for RAF Harrowbeer. (Not my force area anyway). If you got mugged up there it probably would not show on mapping system. I'd just put nearest known place into a certain box and from that - I know which district deals with that area. In that situation I'd put some pub at Yelverton as Locus and annotate "airfield near locus"
What, "Near the big rock on the Tavistock road" not refined enough?

More seriously, do you have several address fields that can be entered? The only time I've had reason to phone 999 for the Police was when the house across the road was being broken in to. I didn't know their address, so gave my own (with the caveat "it's the house across the road"). Must have been a relatively quiet night as a car arrived really quickly. To my address. To try and arrest me as I came out the front door to meet them.
 
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I think he’s saying it’s a major flaw in YOUR command and briefing structure. Summat like this:

a) Kid finds mortar round in the woods. Tells Dad.
b) Dad goes and looks at it and goes “fcuk, that’s a bomb”.
c) Dad calls 999. Plod sent to look at it.
d) “Fcuk, that’s a bomb”.
e) Plod call EOD out.
f) Happens to be @dingerr on the bomb truck.
g) Dingerr wants to know what the script is, and to get the place cordoned off before he gets there.
h) Unless the initial report to EOD tasking has the right number to call for the bloke on the ground with shiny epaulettes, who does he speak to while en-route? Provision of that number must be with Plod.

That exact scenario would go like this:

Phonecall...Iffy looking thing in bush on street.
Looks like a bomb ...(all usual appearence/smells questions asked.
Looks like something he's seen on a game..possibly a bomb...

"Priority grade-suspicious circs"

Dingerr would not have been informed prior to the above. He'd be called when established EOD incident
Had officers attended and established explodey stuff was at play then Gold command would have been informed and I would be inconsequential. I could if I wanted open the log to see how it was progressing but...chances are..I'd already be knee-deep in Kaydon sending nasty mesaages to his ex on facebook by then.
Gold command would have alerted Dingeer and the chocks from his chariot removed as he launches himself at the situation :)

*I have never, as yet, dealt with what could be described as a "major incident". There will be people here who have though and can possibly answer better.
 
What, "Near the big rock on the Tavistock road" not refined enough?

More seriously, do you have several address fields that can be entered? The only time I've had reason to phone 999 for the Police was when the house across the road was being broken in to. I didn't know their address, so gave my own (with the caveat "it's the house across the road". Must have been a relatively quiet night as a car arrived really quickly. To my address. To try and arrest me as I came out the front door to meet them.
“No you fcuking retards, it’s the house across the street. I was the one that called you”.

”A likely story Sir, do you not think we’ve heard that one before? You can either get in the fcuking van, or we can do this the hard way”.

”FFS...” :)
 

potter

Old-Salt
“No you fcuking retards, it’s the house across the street. I was the one that called you”.

”A likely story Sir, do you not think we’ve heard that one before? You can either get in the fcuking van, or we can do this the hard way”.

”FFS...” :)
Thankfully it went more like:

PC Dave* : "Boss, good thing I know you, I was about to arrest you as this was the address I was given. You're not the burglar are you?"
Potter (under breath): "FFS".
Potter (out loud): "Dave, no, I'm not. You're right. I was the one who called you. It's the house across the street".
Potter (under breath): "FFS".

* - 18 months previously PC Dave was OCdt Dave at the OTC I was an instructor at.
 
My force are gently-gently and hoping peer pressure rules the way. God knows how Londist are doing/dealing/
We fill in for many of the other services. We get defibrillator & heart attack calls from the LAS these days, LFB will sometimes call us to fix a door that they've deleted and as for social services..... Well anyway, the Met needs to learn to say "no" again.

I get that but..yes..I deal with the shit aspects of the telephone side of a situation but - and based on former life as well..I'm well aware what shit situations smell/look like. Whatever shite I have to deal with..a frontline officer has to engage with / witness.
..

My "trigger" though is people who ought to know better and seek to try and argue the toss on 999 or other issues that are not actually life and death.

..

Gets galling though if we Xref a log to a neighbouring force...we tell them its our log 1234 of today's date, and they acknowledge and say "thats now our log 135 of today".
True about frontliners witnessing stuff, but I sometimes think leaving your mind to picture and dwell on stuff is even worse.

My trigger is kids. I helped raise my little sister (16 years younger) and seeing small people being hurt or worse, that I struggle with. Only time I've had a little cry at work.

As for incident logs. What sticks in my mind is having to call Kent Police as we'd lifted one of their wanted offenders, on a weekend. It would have been about 7pm. Our incident log in the Met was at 11 thousand something. Theirs was 165. I'm not for a moment suggesting theirs is any less challenging a job, but it made me think, it's a different world they face.
 

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