89 Military Intelligence Section

#1
Does anyone here know if it's pronounced 'eight-nine' MI Section or 'eighty-nine/ninth' MI section. It's one of those things you need to have heard to know a bit like in the Marines where it's pronounced 'Forty' Commando and 'Four-Five' Commando.

Do all members of 89 have to complete P-Coy? and also, what sort of strength is the section, are we talking about twelve?, i think that's the number that jumped into Arnhem in '44 attached to the Division, not sure if the old Field Security Sections operate the same way as the current sections...at Arnhem the section had to fight as infantry with 2 Para at the bridge, so didn't have time to arrest and interrogate the Dutch SS!!

Operator Military Intelligence is my main job choice, just awaiting a second go at selection. The first time they found a heart murmur but after having it checked by a consultant i have been given the all clear.

Thanks in advance for any help.
 
#2
Dixie,

Known as eighty nine and all volunteers were/are expected to complete P Coy, although several who have tried have failed.

Glad to see your arrythmia wasn't something to worry about.

Good luck with selection.

Be nice you lot, he might deliver your mail.
 
#3
Minnesota_Viking said:
Dixie,

Known as eighty nine and all volunteers were/are expected to complete P Coy, although several who have tried have failed.
Unless you were already there when 81 (or was it 82? - I forget) and 89 swapped over in 1981 (Hi Paul, Spike and Rich!), in which case you simply carried on as normal - new arrivals could try for P coy but those of who were there prior to the changeover simply continued to waer the green berets - which were far more exclusive in Aldershot in any case...

Years later I met an ex-para in a pub in wales who remembered me because of the green beret.

Mind you I did enjoy watching the troops during P coy - most mornings the road through the barracks resembled Napoleon's retreat from Moscow with the casualties limping up to the med centre...

Happy days...

:D :D :D

Rodney2q
 
#4
Dixie

Whilst all are encouraged to attempt P-Coy, you do not have to pass to serve in the section.

MV is correct, the name is pronounced as single digits (Eight Nine) not as a number (Eighty nine), as are pretty much all section number/names throughout the corps.

Good luck with joining, looks like you enjoy your research so should stand you in good stead for the course.
 
#5
Must admit, I've always called it eight-nine.
 
#6
eye_spy said:
Dixie

Whilst all are encouraged to attempt P-Coy, you do not have to pass to serve in the section. .
But even fewer pass the course to serve with four nine.
 
#7
Well, there you go. In my day (harumph) the sections in 8 Intelligence Company were always pronounced "Eighty..."

Or was everyone laughing at me behind my back ?
 
#8
Dubb_al_Ibn said:
Well, there you go. In my day (harumph) the sections in 8 Intelligence Company were always pronounced "Eighty..."

Or was everyone laughing at me behind my back ?
Indeed - 83 Int Sect at 24 Airportable Bde was always 'eighty three'.

And a fine lot we were ...
 
#10
Was there a certain time when this fundamental change took place. It was definitely "eighty-whatever" in the early 1980s ? I think we should be told.

Eighty-one - Tidworth
Eighty-two - Colchester
Eighty-four - Bulford (wasn't HQ 8 Int Coy there as well?)
Eighty-nine - Aldershot

Er... I'll have to get my collection of R&Ls out of the loft to remember the rest.
 
#12
eye_spy said:
Dixie

Whilst all are encouraged to attempt P-Coy, you do not have to pass to serve in the section.

MV is correct, the name is pronounced as single digits (Eight Nine) not as a number (Eighty nine), as are pretty much all section number/names throughout the corps.

Good luck with joining, looks like you enjoy your research so should stand you in good stead for the course.
No, I said eighty nine - its nomenclature during the seventies and eighties. My remaining memory chip remembers all sections were pronounced as such e.g. Fifty Three Security Section, Seventy Four Intelligence Section and Ninety Six Security Section.

However, these days, because the size of the Corps has increased exponentially there are such organisations as Two Four Three MI Section and they have even given a number to AISU - takes your breath away.....
 
#15
Thanks everyone for the feedback, so i'm taking it i would get away with calling it 'eight-nine'.

I know it's all cloud talk at the moment but i would love to serve in 16 Air Assault in some capacity, i have always held the British Airborne units that served during the second world war and there after in such high regard. One of the first proper books i read growing up was ' A Bridge Too Far' by Cornelius Ryan so that might explain a few things about my interest. I am hoping to visit Arnhem for the 65th Anni. this September (depending on selection/training), it's a shame because the whole thing could have been avoided if they just listened to the Intelligence Officer, Major Brian Urquhart...he did his job.

Anyway first things first, must pass selection and get recommended for the Int Corps, pass the Chicksands selection process and then complete basic. It's a challenge but that's why i'm doing it!
 
#16
Instead of starting up a new thread i might as well ask now...do OPMI's get recommended for the linguist course through a test, maybe something like the MLAT or can anyone attempt it?

I speak a small amount of Russian, i studied it for a year at College many years ago now and have started it up again. The linguist course is something i would consider if all goes well. On completing the course, do linguists mainly work in HUMINT or are their skills used across the board?

Apologies for the plethora of questions, i am very inquisitive and researching the INT Corps only goes so far....it's all very hush hush, well naturally 'loose lips sink ships' and all that :D
 
#17
If it helps when CI Det Taunton moved to Bulford for the first time, they were called Nintey One section, Brecon Det Nintey Two,

Bad enough to be called "Maj Cardwell's Crack Nintey Section Section" who interviewed many of Callan's mercs that came back from Angola.

"Crack Nine Zero" would have been way, way over the top.

Could a number of OC's of 9 Coy who had come from the reptile house been responsible for a move to nine-one, nine-two etc?
 
#18
Bag of worms there Dixie66, and don't expect to get recommended for a linguist course on the basis of your MLAT: most in the Corps will do their best to persuade you that it isn't the way to go, and they seem to succeed. And Russian is definitely staraya shapka these days. Double dutch is the language of choice throughout the Army - and beyond.

If you want to know more about linguist employment, ask quietly or alternatively PM me for an unbiased view of all things gobbledygook.
 
#19
'Staraya Shapka'.... shapka i'm sure is one of those typical Russian winter hats, (or more apt for them all year round hats :D ) so i'm guessing the phrase is 'old hat'. very good :D...i'm afraid my double dutch isn't much better though :(

Russian is still one of the six languages of the United Nations, spoken by many potential enemies and fellow NATO allies along with i'm sure some older Afghan natives after the Russian occupation in the late 70's and into the 80's. I know since the end of the Soviet Union it's not been quite so in vogue and god knows James Bond films have not been the same since Communism collapsed there, saying that Goldeneye was a good one!

PM imbound.

Thanks
 
#20
Eighty One went to the Falklands in 1982. On return to the 'shot (after the departure of a well known 'ice cream' OC and re-org became Eighty Nine along with all the other Eighties in 8 Int Coy, complete with HQ in Bulford (and along with all the other Nineties in 9 Sy Coy - HQ in Wilton). Having been a member of both in some shape or form at the time, that is how it was. And my memory ain't that bad (yet!).

P Coy was not compulsory but 'expected'. Many tried and many failed but that did not preclude service with Eighty Nine (many passed too to be fair - despite the efforts of the HQ and Sig Sqn - 9 (Para) Sqn RE consistently ran the best 'pre-para'). Some did the jumps course and wore wings instead of the 'lightbulb'. One memorable case didn't bother with either but still pitched up with his maroon beret and wings (after having changed his equally unearned 'sandy beret' at the QM's en route).

I also remember a subsequent RSM of 2MI who was one of the first 'badged' Int Corps soldiers to pass P Coy for a number of years then (he was, admittedly, a transferee but passed P Coy as an Int Corps soldier). Most other 'winged' members of 81/89 til then were transferees who had become illustrious prior to transfer to our Corps.
 

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