82nd Airborne Legend

Ouch......... a few technical points here. It's the navigator with all his learning of things compass, aircraft speed, ground wind speed, adds it all up on a piece of paper aided by a n HB pencil, who decides which colour to press the button on. Pilot merely turns the steering wheel en route and puts his foot on the brakes when told.

Us Brits and our Cousins have a different red / green light routine. Our Cousines have an inordinately lengthy 'red light (standby)' time frame while ours change within 10/15 secs as a rule. Can be longer on lengthy cross country runs to the DZ, but not usually.

So still a dude up front yeah? So jumping on red say 2 minutes early would put them miles away from the objective...
Wonder if his plan was to avoid the fight.
 
So still a dude up front yeah? So jumping on red say 2 minutes early would put them miles away from the objective...
Wonder if his plan was to avoid the fight.
Well a crew up front if only to ensure the 4* is still open at endex.

So, to your point, 2mins = 120 secs at 240kts approach speed throttling back to 120/130kts , flap settings (depending on how current Nav last did his catagorisation check :)) I'm being really flippant there, slip stream deflector plates in position.

2mins early American rules style, would put them in Cuba...... errrrrrr.... not for the first time, but that's for another time.
 
Well a crew up front if only to ensure the 4* is still open at endex.

So, to your point, 2mins = 120 secs at 240kts approach speed throttling back to 120/130kts , flap settings (depending on how current Nav last did his catagorisation check :)) I'm being really flippant there, slip stream deflector plates in position.

2mins early American rules style, would put them in Cuba...... errrrrrr.... not for the first time, but that's for another time.
At Normandy when the Rangers came ashore at Pointe du Hoc, a Paratrooper from the 101st was at the cliff base. His stick was dropped over the channel and he was closest to shore and lived. He had to climb with the Rangers and fight alongside them for several days
https://armyhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/7.jpg
 
At Normandy when the Rangers came ashore at Pointe du Hoc, a Paratrooper from the 101st was at the cliff base. His stick was dropped over the channel and he was closest to shore and lived. He had to climb with the Rangers and fight alongside them for several days
https://armyhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/7.jpg
In all, I was commentating on post war stuff and the lessons learned from all of those 'moments'.
David Stirling had his 'moment' on his very first para. delivery operation, but it didn't inhibit the ethos.

Parachuting evolved beyond the imaginations of those who considered it's use and technical development restricted to some sort of leap out of a C-130.
BASE jumping suggested some options. In 1979 I was para 'gliding' onto to tall buildings from helios airborne parked some 15 klicks upwind of a major city, weather conditions permitting. The skill factor was being put in place, despite how the easiness current movies portray it. It's very technical stuff, especially on the operators.
 

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Well a crew up front if only to ensure the 4* is still open at endex.

So, to your point, 2mins = 120 secs at 240kts approach speed throttling back to 120/130kts , flap settings (depending on how current Nav last did his catagorisation check :)) I'm being really flippant there, slip stream deflector plates in position.

2mins early American rules style, would put them in Cuba...... errrrrrr.... not for the first time, but that's for another time.
That last paragraph is one the best I have seen on here. Hilarious.
 
So still a dude up front yeah? So jumping on red say 2 minutes early would put them miles away from the objective...
Wonder if his plan was to avoid the fight.
The light sequence is red-green-red. He didn’t jump early - he jumped late. Since he was following the stick out the door he would be relatively close to the rally point.
 
The light sequence is red-green-red. He didn’t jump early - he jumped late. Since he was following the stick out the door he would be relatively close to the rally point.
So do you jump on red or green?
 
So do you jump on red or green?
In training you jump on green. In combat the entire stick goes out the door. You might end up with jumpers in trees but that’s an acceptable risk. Of course, if you are close to water or other known danger then you don’t go on red.
 
The light sequence is red-green-red. He didn’t jump early - he jumped late. Since he was following the stick out the door he would be relatively close to the rally point.
Makes sense now---Delay due to first guy hesitating/refusing.

A "Combat" jump---- something to be proud about. Bet he felt a right twat.
Can't have been that many in recent years.
 
Makes sense now---Delay due to first guy hesitating/refusing.

A "Combat" jump---- something to be proud about. Bet he felt a right twat.
Can't have been that many in recent years.
Since 2001 US jumps only

Afghanistan
19-20 October 2001- Det, HHC, 75th Ranger Regiment; HHC, A, and C Companies, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
DZ- Obj Rhino at Dry Lake Airstrip

13 November 2001- Det, B Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
DZ- Vicinity of Alimarden Kan-E-Bagat

25 February 2003- HHC, A, and C Companies, 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; Det, B/3-504th Infantry
DZ- Chahar Borjak, Nimruz Province

3 July 2004 - Team 3, Regimental Reconnaissance Detachment, HHC, 75th Ranger Regiment
DZ- Southeastern region (HALO insertion)


Iraq
24 March 2003- Det, HHC, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; C Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; Det, 24th Special Tactics Squadron
DZ- Al Qaim, near the Syrian border

26 March 2003- Task Force Viking / Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force - North: Det, 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group; HHC, 173rd Airborne Brigade; Det, 74th Infantry Platoon; 173rd Support Company, 250th Medical Detachment, D-319th Field Artillery; 501st Support Company; 2-503rd Infantry; 1-508th Infantry; 4th Air Support Operations Squadron; 86th Contingency Response Group
DZ- Bashur Drop zone

28-29 March 2003- Det, HHC, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; A Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; Det, 27th Engineer Battalion; Det, 24th Special Tactics Squadron
DZ- West of the Haditha Dam and the town of Haditha
 
Makes sense now---Delay due to first guy hesitating/refusing.

A "Combat" jump---- something to be proud about. Bet he felt a right twat.
Can't have been that many in recent years.
It would do if that's what the OP once stated. But it wasn't. He told us the aircraft was taking rounds so he, and others purposely jumped on a red light.

The aircraft made it home in one piece and the men who didn't jump were incessantly bullied back at base. From memory I believe they even made up a vicious cadence song to march to whenever the non jumpers were around.

He was quite proud of that.
 
Since 2001 US jumps only

Afghanistan
19-20 October 2001- Det, HHC, 75th Ranger Regiment; HHC, A, and C Companies, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
DZ- Obj Rhino at Dry Lake Airstrip

13 November 2001- Det, B Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
DZ- Vicinity of Alimarden Kan-E-Bagat

25 February 2003- HHC, A, and C Companies, 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; Det, B/3-504th Infantry
DZ- Chahar Borjak, Nimruz Province

3 July 2004 - Team 3, Regimental Reconnaissance Detachment, HHC, 75th Ranger Regiment
DZ- Southeastern region (HALO insertion)


Iraq
24 March 2003- Det, HHC, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; C Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; Det, 24th Special Tactics Squadron
DZ- Al Qaim, near the Syrian border

26 March 2003- Task Force Viking / Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force - North: Det, 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group; HHC, 173rd Airborne Brigade; Det, 74th Infantry Platoon; 173rd Support Company, 250th Medical Detachment, D-319th Field Artillery; 501st Support Company; 2-503rd Infantry; 1-508th Infantry; 4th Air Support Operations Squadron; 86th Contingency Response Group
DZ- Bashur Drop zone

28-29 March 2003- Det, HHC, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; A Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment; Det, 27th Engineer Battalion; Det, 24th Special Tactics Squadron
DZ- West of the Haditha Dam and the town of Haditha
I'd think our Paras and others would be well happy to do that------- one of the reasons they exist(may have occurred.) Was called up for possible drop in 1980--
It would do if that's what the OP once stated. But it wasn't. He told us the aircraft was taking rounds so he, and others purposely jumped on a red light.

The aircraft made it home in one piece and the men who didn't jump were incessantly bullied back at base. From memory I believe they even made up a vicious cadence song to march to whenever the non jumpers were around.

He was quite proud of that.
It would do if that's what the OP once stated. But it wasn't. He told us the aircraft was taking rounds so he, and others purposely jumped on a red light.

The aircraft made it home in one piece and the men who didn't jump were incessantly bullied back at base. From memory I believe they even made up a vicious cadence song to march to whenever the non jumpers were around.

He was quite proud of that.
OK-- sorry.
 
I'd think our Paras and others would be well happy to do that------- one of the reasons they exist(may have occurred.) Was called up for possible drop in 1980--



OK-- sorry.

His thread is still there. Search Cowardice in thread titles.
 

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