7th Armoured Division January - May 1945

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by quiet_teuchter, Feb 23, 2009.

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  1. I am trying to track down some detail on the operations of 7th Armoured Division January - May 1945. The Division ended up clearing through Bergen-Hohne on the way to Hamburg and I have in mind to organise some very local (for me) battlefield tours.

    I have tried Google and wikipedia, but to no great success. Has anyone got any good suggestions, preferably a book with maps and unit dispositions? From that I can go about getting hold of regimental histories etc.

  2. Doh! :x :x

    Checked Paterson's site but didn't think to check bibliography... :)

  3. QT - check PMs...
  4. From my bookshelf:

    George Forty "Desert Rats At War" Part 2 Europe, large illustrated book.
    Robin Neilands "The Desert Rats - 7th Armoured Division 1940-1945.
    John Parker "Desert Rats" has one summary chapter on this phase of the war.

    Late 1944 mopping up ops in Holland, Short of manpower then:
    January 1945 "Operation Blackcock" the drive into Germany.
    4th July 1945 7 Armd Div entered Berlin.
    21 July 1945 7 Armd Div represented British Army in Victory Parade in Berlin

    Attached Files:

  5. And another thing.

    Wikipedia has an item Operation Blackcock that is OK, and if you then click on the link 7th Armoured Division it will go to 7th Armoured Division (United Kingdom). This gives the Divisional Order of Battle for the Normandy Landings, but very little on the campaign in Europe. You have to go to 2nd Army Group for more.
  6. Thanks for all the help. :thumleft:

    A copy of 'No Triumphant Procession: Forgotten Battles of April 1945' by John Russell has been ordered as well as sundry books on ops PLUNDER and BLACKCOCK. Additionally I am booked into the Imperial War Museum at Easter to view some of the documents that they have covering the period. For those who have not used the IWM before, they are, like the National Army Museum, exceptionally courteous, knowledgeable and helpful people and come highly recommended.