7 flight becomes 667 squadron

Cyberhacker

War Hero
Not seen this reported elsewhere...


The Army Air Corps' Brunei-based No 7 Flight - which operates the Bell 212 AH1/AH3 - has been re-designated as No 667 Squadron. The change became official from August 1.

The unit is located at the British garrison at Medicina Lines in Seria, Brunei, where it has been present since November 1, 1994. It supports the resident infantry battalion from the Brigade of Gurkhas, as well as the Training Team Brunei, which runs jungle warfare training courses through the British Army Jungle Warfare Training School.

I'm sure there is a rational explanation for the need for a full squadron, for four (??) helicopters

Does this mean a full squadron HQ team?
 
Not seen this reported elsewhere...




I'm sure there is a rational explanation for the need for a full squadron, for four (??) helicopters

Does this mean a full squadron HQ team?
It's a dual thingy. It preserves a squadron name, one with a history.

And, cynically, it gives the opportunity to have more officers jobs. However, AAC Flts have been commanded by a major for quite some time.

ETA: I do get irritated somewhat by lazy journalists who use RAF type squadron/flight nomenclature for AAC units. Army squadrons are never 'No 7 Flight' nor 'No 657 Squadron'. They're just 7 Flight and 657 Squadron.
 
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It's a dual thingy. It preserves a squadron name, one with a history.

And, cynically, it gives the opportunity to have more officers jobs. However, 7 Flt has been commanded by a major for quite some time.

ETA: I do get irritated somewhat by lazy journalists who use RAF type squadron/flight nomenclature for AAC units. Army squadrons are never 'No 7 Flight' nor 'No 657 Squadron'. They're just 7 Flight and 657 Squadron.

That'll be because they are not flying tanks, as ane fule kno.
 
It's a dual thingy. It preserves a squadron name, one with a history.

And, cynically, it gives the opportunity to have more officers jobs. However, 7 Flt has been commanded by a major for quite some time.

ETA: I do get irritated somewhat by lazy journalists who use RAF type squadron/flight nomenclature for AAC units. Army squadrons are never 'No 7 Flight' nor 'No 657 Squadron'. They're just 7 Flight and 657 Squadron.
I don't think 667 has much in the way of A.A.C history, Other squadrons e.g 654 are still gathering dust.
 
Not seen this reported elsewhere...




I'm sure there is a rational explanation for the need for a full squadron, for four (??) helicopters

Does this mean a full squadron HQ team?
Back in the day that would have been an O.C (Major), 2IC and flight commander(Captain), S.S.M and a squadron clerk for a 10 aircraft squadron. Can't see how you would do it with much less if you only had four aircraft. Still maybe inflation has hit the modern day A.A.C!!!!!.
 
Not seen this reported elsewhere...




I'm sure there is a rational explanation for the need for a full squadron, for four (??) helicopters

Does this mean a full squadron HQ team?
Bell 212 AH/1/3 ? I thought they were just utility helicopters? When the AAC got them in 1994 I remember reading in Soldier magazine that they were civilian aircraft customised for the army with a civilian contracter dealing with long term maintenance. The same with the Bell 212 flight in Belize which replaced the Gazelles.

Before 1994 it used to be C Flight 660 Sqn AAC with 3 Westland Scouts. The rest of 660 Sqn AAC were based in Sek Kong in the New Territories in Hong Kong with 10 Scouts. Although one crashed in 1985 killing the passenger a RA Major from HQBF HK. The AAC pilot only had one leg apparently, although this was not the cause of the crash.
 
ETA: I do get irritated somewhat by lazy journalists who use RAF type squadron/flight nomenclature for AAC units. Army squadrons are never 'No 7 Flight' nor 'No 657 Squadron'. They're just 7 Flight and 657 Squadron.

It was the crustacean fashion as well and arguably still is.

The 'Number' bit crept in to prevent the even more annoying habit of American authors referring to "617th 'Dambusters' Squadron" and even, God Help us '1st (F) Fighter Squadron' (although that was in something I was asked to proof read and the author received a robust and perhaps overly-detailed learning moment as a result. It didn't appear in print...)
 

Yokel

LE
It was the crustacean fashion as well and arguably still is.

The 'Number' bit crept in to prevent the even more annoying habit of American authors referring to "617th 'Dambusters' Squadron" and even, God Help us '1st (F) Fighter Squadron' (although that was in something I was asked to proof read and the author received a robust and perhaps overly-detailed learning moment as a result. It didn't appear in print...)

Then we also have media numpties referring to 'the Third Commando Brigade' (NO - THREE) or 'Forty Five' (NO - FOUR FIVE) Commando, or (in the old days) 'Eight hundred (th for added annoyance) naval air squadron' - (NO - EIGHT ZERO ZERO).

Sometimes people get so fed up they write it out longhand - FOUR FIVE CDO or EIGHT ZERO NINE NAS.

..and breathe...
 

Yokel

LE
These are very small fry compared to things like describing a Royal Marines General as an 'Army General'. Yes - the Daily Fail strikes again.

Sir Gordon, 59, retired from the Royal Marines in 2019...

So how exactly is or was he an 'Army General'?

Tossers!
 
Green ones?
There is a story that a flight attached to an armoured unit in the Middle East were ordered to repaint the aircraft to match the tanks by the regiment C.O. No idea as to veracity but has a ring of truth.
Bell 212 AH/1/3 ? I thought they were just utility helicopters? When the AAC got them in 1994 I remember reading in Soldier magazine that they were civilian aircraft customised for the army with a civilian contracter dealing with long term maintenance. The same with the Bell 212 flight in Belize which replaced the Gazelles.

Before 1994 it used to be C Flight 660 Sqn AAC with 3 Westland Scouts. The rest of 660 Sqn AAC were based in Sek Kong in the New Territories in Hong Kong with 10 Scouts. Although one crashed in 1985 killing the passenger a RA Major from HQBF HK. The AAC pilot only had one leg apparently, although this was not the cause of the crash.
I think the AH is Army Helicopter not Attack helicopter if that is your thinking. If not ignore.
The Scout and Sioux were also AH1
 
These are very small fry compared to things like describing a Royal Marines General as an 'Army General'. Yes - the Daily Fail strikes again.

Sir Gordon, 59, retired from the Royal Marines in 2019...

So how exactly is or was he an 'Army General'?

Tossers!
To be fair, if I was a DM journo I would do it just to wind up the old dinosaurs on Arrse and then click onto the site to have a good giggle at them chuntering away and almost having a heart attack.
 

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