60 years Chinook

My memory might not be what it used to be but German military and American coastguard helicopters weren’t in general used in the British army back in the seventies.

I flew, at times frequently, in Wessex, Puma and Scout helicopters. All of them were either RAF or AAC aircraft.

The couple of trips in an American army Chinook were familiarisation flights while on an exercise down on Salisbury Plain and as such, a one off event.

Presumably your flights were of a similar nature?
Never said they were, the point was about rear access ramps.
The original poster said American and said 1970's.
The Chinook did not enter UK service till the 80's.
 
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PhotEx

On ROPS
On ROPs
Never said they were the point was about rear access ramps.
The original poster said American and said 1970's.
The Chinook did not enter UK service till the 80's.

Originally ordered in 1967, cancelled in the withdrawal from East of Suez
Ordered again in the late 70's and finally turned up in 1980.
 
Never said they were the point was about rear access ramps.
The original poster said American and said 1970's.
The Chinook did not enter UK service till the 80's.
It entered service with the RAF in 1982 I think.

I said in my my post that my experience in 1977 down on Salisbury Plain was in American army machine.
 
In the 70's our allies seemed to have a more macho helicopter fleet.
The Americans with the Chinook, the Germans with the 53G. Both with the Huey.
The French Gazelle was a little limp wristed in comparison, the Sioux a throw back to the 1950's.
The Scout held it's own but the Alouette 111 would probably have been better. Certainly from a maintenance point of view.

Then the Americans had the HueyCobra.
Had a fine day out at Illesheim which included a flight sat in the gunners cockpit. Making some small talk with the pilot I asked about autos (Vietnam was only just over).
So he proceeded to demo one. Preceeded by the words "we've just been shot down". American pilots got shot down British pilots has practice engine failures!!! This was followed by a demo of a steep dive which was rather impressive. Pilot remarked that it was 60 degrees and that they could go down at almost 90.
The numbers were impressive as well. At the time a British anti-tank squadron would be about 6 aircraft.
There were about 24 Cobras on the line with a Kiowa for every two and Huey's for support.

Happy days
 
well,you had the Alouette II, which was well liked by it's users. We had the Alouette III which was an excellent heli (but, as ever, the French took the piss with their parts costs) and it was a great all-rounder.
 
The ‘chook entered Australian service late ‘74, and were based at RAAF Amberley, west of Brisbane … would’a been an asset to have had in Darwin to help after Cyclone Tracy, but unable to do so. Fortunately, I was posted to Amberley from Darwin in March ‘75 and in the six months I spent there I scored a few trips on training tasks … great bit of kit, which the Gubmnt decided to hand-off to Army, along with the Hueys in ‘89. Memories, hey!
 
well,you had the Alouette II, which was well liked by it's users. We had the Alouette III which was an excellent heli (but, as ever, the French took the piss with their parts costs) and it was a great all-rounder.
I have thought that an Alouette II/III mix would have been better for the army than the Sioux/Scout.
Hindsight is a wonderfull thing.
 
I live not far from Northolt but slightly closer to Heathrow which is approximately a mile south of us. Our house is very close to the flight corridor that helicopters follow from Northolt to Heathrow as they transit the area.

We often see all manner of helicopters including Chinooks and occasionally, Apaches, flying almost directly overhead as they go their way in both directions.

I can usually tell from the noise if it’s a Chinook or an Apache and I usually have a look just to see if I’m correct.
I don't see Apaches flying over that often but I saw two today flying over at 1525 heading southwest towards Odiham. At about 1725 a Chinook flew over but unusualy that turned east instead of SW towards its nest at Odiham. The direction I thought the Apaches would have headed.

I have seen the odd Blackhawk or two when the leader of the free world is in town.
 
1st Cavalry Division(Airmobile) had "Go-Go Birds" ACH-47A's in South Vietnam
1x 40mm Grenade launcher, M5
2x 20mm M139/M24A1 Hispano auto cannon
2x 2.75Inch 19 shot rocket pods, XM 159
5x .50 Brownings, A/N M2

as an option the rockets removed and 2x M134 Minigun pods fitted

Also a rear ramp chute to drop 81mm Mortar bombs

 

tiv

LE
Really?

images


Had an memorable flight in one of these at Soest in 1975.

Then there were also these

images
And not forgetting Frank Piasecki's 1953 YH-16 which, while not successful, pointed the way.

YH-16.jpg
 

tiv

LE
Looks like the Bristol Belvedere. Another not very successful design.

View attachment 606193
It does, to the extent that it had an engine at each end. Never seen much about it but if memory serves the military lost interest then, having fitted turboshaft engines in place of the radials, one of the rotor shafts failed due to some attached instrumentation. The resultant crash killed both pilots and the programme was terminated.
 

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