50% of under 35s are on incapacity benefit.

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Ord_Sgt, Jan 3, 2008.

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  1. Ord_Sgt

    Ord_Sgt RIP

    Just listening to Radio 5 and they had a segment saying that.

    It seems the total risen from 600.000 15 years ago to 1.8 million today. Apparently 1 million of those are in for a rather rude awakening as incapacity benefit is higher than unemployment benefit and also raises the longer you are on it and its costing too much. But that is to stop and the new system has a fixed rate.

    Also they are aiming to get that 1 million skivers either in a job or on unemployment benefit.

    Obviously the system has been used to skew unemployment figures but now even this fcuked up government realises that 13 billion pounds a year is unsustainable.

    What a bummer for Sven. :lol:
     
  2. I'm tempted to believe that 50% of under 35s are incapable. The number of folk who are capable of expressing a coherent thought, let alone acting on it, seems to be inversely proportional to age. Where the hell are all these lunatics going to find someone gullible enough to employ them?

    I hear Mrs Windsor's hiring...

    Carrots, (aged 37 ¾).
     

  3. My bold: "Do you want fries with that?" :wink:
     
  4. Without a doubt 50% of people working for Radio Five Live are incapable.
     
  5. Source:
    http://timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article3123586.ece
     
  6. http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23430628-details/Half+a+million+young+people+'too+sick+to+work'+are+claiming+benefits/article.do


    ".....figures from the Department for Work and Pensions obtained by the Financial Times show that last May

    504,000 people below the age of 35 were claiming incapacity benefit or severe disablement allowance compared with

    443,000 claiming jobseeker's allowance."


    Typically people are being signed off from work by doctors with stress or depresssion.

    There are now fears that instead of the problem easing as older workers on benefits begin receiving pensions, many more young people than expected will also become claimants.

    Paul Bivand, a welfare-to-work expert at Inclusion, a think-tank, said: "There is a second generation of people coming onto incapacity benefits for mental reasons. This may well be related to ingrained hopelessness in particular areas."


    And voting patterns in those areas would be, oohhh, let me guess............

    Nu Liarbor has dumped so much money into the client state that they have bred another and bigger generation of those who have never worked and simply never want to.

    So no less than 300,000 are claiming on grounds of "mental and behavioural disorders"? Handy, that.

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/679f764c-b99e-11dc-bb66-0000779fd2ac.html
     
  7. I thought that the 'New' Labour regime had created a 'knowledge economy' - how 'incapacitated' do you have to be unable to sit in a call centre.

    The sooner benefits were turned back into enough for subsistence rather than sufficient to allow an elective, alternative lifestyle, the sooner a few more sponging, workshy layabouts would get their backsides out to work.

    Surely it isn't impossible to sort out the deserving disabled from the undeserving idle?
     
  8. "What a bummer for Sven. "

    Sven's under 35???
     
  9. Story in the FT

    link

    www.ft.com/cms/s/0/400091b8-b96f11dc-bb66-0000779fd2ac.html?nclick_check=1

    Beats being on the dole,you don't have to bother to get up to sign on every 2 weeks,and there's more money than plain old jobseeker's allowance.

    All they have to do is fool(or bung )their GP into sign them off with some imaginary ailment.Apparently stress is one of the latest ones.

    More rigourous tests seem to be required by government appointed doctors.

    Then again,maybe the Dept of work and Pensions just want to sweep the problem under the carpet.
     
  10. Ord_Sgt

    Ord_Sgt RIP

    No but after eight years on benefits I think he is about to get a rather rude awakening.
     
  11. As a copper I come in daily contact with the Welfare Class and I have thought for a long time now that not only are these people unemployed but they are totally f**king unemployable! I wouldn't trust these morons to deliver milk, never mind work in a call centre which at the very least demands some ability to communicate verbally with other human beings. They are untrustworthy, unreliable and as a rule depressingly uneducated. A complete absence of social skills and an awareness of the world as it exists beyond the end of their street is the norm. These people are regressing, de-evolving almost, and within the next generation will have become completely feral. How in name of Jesus we are going to deal with them I honestly do not know. And if that thought wasn't depressing enough, the b*st*rds are breeding!!
     
  12. This grips my sh!t that we pay taxes for spongers. I was going to write to the DSS and ask them to provide a few of the fatherless on incapacity benefit and a birch to me at 16:30 each Friday so I could trash some well being into them.

    The DSS should also look at Doctors who have a high level of spongers and suggest strongly that they need ot either shape up or get struck off for malpractice.

    Benefits should be earned not taken for granted!
     
  13. i think that should read, 50% of those on incapacity benefit are under 35, which is very different from the other way around!!!

    There are approx 26m under 35 in UK!!!

    (edited to add approx 12m between age 16-35, but that would still = 6m on incapacity benefits.... )
     
  14. ........but they have to find immigrant labour to do that - you just can't get the quality from our indigineous labour force.
     
  15. You're on the wrong thread, romach.

    BTW best place to look for spongers? The media.