50 new Apaches Inbound

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
50 helicopters? I was chatting to an American officer recently who commanded 72 Medevac helicopters in Iraq as a Lieutenant Colonel. I know as Apache is a lot more sexy than a Blackhawk but its the scale of the US military that is so staggering...
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
Block II was still the AH-64D. It was just a series of upgrades to the original Block I AH-64D - including things such as upgrades to the FCR to prevent blue on blue IDs, HF radios etc.

But these were introduced around 2003 (I think) and were applicable to the US Army variant - whereas we had our own variant, the WAH-64 - based on the AH-64D.
Many thanks.
 
They used to make very well engineered garage doors
Which in the Westland tradition were licensed from a North American company.

Edit: Yes, but why on Earth do I know this?

Originally formed as part of Westland's Engineers Ltd in 1948, as part of a diversification strategy away from military products, Garador Limited was setup to manufacture one piece garage doors. Soon after Westland's Engineers Limited purchased a license from Canada to manufacture one piece Up and Over garage doors and became the only manufacturer of such doors in the UK through the 1950s

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Westland don't seem to have done much original since WEW Petter went to English Electric.
 
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50 helicopters? I was chatting to an American officer recently who commanded 72 Medevac helicopters in Iraq as a Lieutenant Colonel. I know as Apache is a lot more sexy than a Blackhawk but its the scale of the US military that is so staggering...
One of my bosses when I was in had been on exchange at Fort Rucker and he filled the role of Company Commander. He had more aircraft on his flick than were in the entire British Army.
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
50 helicopters? I was chatting to an American officer recently who commanded 72 Medevac helicopters in Iraq as a Lieutenant Colonel. I know as Apache is a lot more sexy than a Blackhawk but its the scale of the US military that is so staggering...
I heard it claimed that the US military destroyed or abandoned more helicopters when they left Vietnam, than the rest of NATO had on operational strength...
 
While there's a lot of waste in the DoD, one of the things the US does a lot better than the UK is use its reserves.

Many of the aircraft fleets are split across the active-duty and reserve units. My local airport is actually an AFB with the airport tacked on the side. The Tennessee Air National Guard operates ancient refueling tankers and Herks out of there. The USAF doesn't have 500 tanker aircraft on active duty, most of them are with ANG units. Same for Herks, C-17s and C-5s. Even some/many fast jet units.

Waiting for a plane the other day I whiled away the minutes watching a Herk doing circuits and bumps. It must have been a new pilot, you could see his landings improve with every circuit.

For battlefield helicopters, (i.e. Blackhawk), the aircrew are mostly CWOs. They don't have to do the whole commissioning thing to drive a helo. And again, many of them are reservists.

I can see the attraction. "You wanna dig trenches and drive trucks at the weekend, or fly?"
 
The Tennessee Air National Guard operates ancient refueling tankers and Herks out of there. The USAF doesn't have 500 tanker aircraft on active duty, most of them are with ANG units. Same for Herks, C-17s and C-5s. Even some/many fast jet units.

For battlefield helicopters, (i.e. Blackhawk), the aircrew are mostly CWOs. They don't have to do the whole commissioning thing to drive a helo. And again, many of them are reservists.

I can see the attraction. "You wanna dig trenches and drive trucks at the weekend, or fly?"
AIUI the ANG rely on a lot of their specialist people (Pilots & Engineers) being full timers on their equivilent of FTRS in order to be able to get the requisite number of hours in
 
For battlefield helicopters, (i.e. Blackhawk), the aircrew are mostly CWOs. They don't have to do the whole commissioning thing to drive a helo. And again, many of them are reservists.
You don't have to do the whole commissioning thing to fly helicopters here, either. Haven't done since the AAC was formed. In fact, we don't have to have a whole special non-commissioned branch to do what they do. They don't take an infantry/armour/sapper/clerk Corporal and turn him/her an Apache pilot.
 
You don't have to do the whole commissioning thing to fly helicopters here, either. Haven't done since the AAC was formed. In fact, we don't have to have a whole special non-commissioned branch to do what they do. They don't take an infantry/armour/sapper/clerk Corporal and turn him/her an Apache pilot.
I'm well aware, but my reference was really to the difference to the USN/USAF model where pilots require commissions. Actually, that's the same in the UK too..
 
I'm well aware, but my reference was really to the difference to the USN/USAF model where pilots require commissions. Actually, that's the same in the UK too..
..in the RN and RAF.
 
I'm well aware, but my reference was really to the difference to the USN/USAF model where pilots require commissions. Actually, that's the same in the UK too..
USMC pilots are all officers too.

I believe the USN has a small number of warrant officer pilots again now (the last ones retired in the '60s and '70s) , flying maritime patrol aircraft and helicopters.
 
Waiting for a plane the other day I whiled away the minutes watching a Herk doing circuits and bumps. It must have been a new pilot, you could see his landings improve with every circuit.
Mmm. Being an Army pilot in the 70s and 80s at this point I must postulate that perhaps said Herc pilot was recovering from a stinking hangover ;)
 
...I believe the USN has a small number of warrant officer pilots again now (the last ones retired in the '60s and '70s) , flying maritime patrol aircraft and helicopters.
I don't think they have.

However, the USAF have just started training SNCO pilots for RPAS.

Regards,
MM
 

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